Parallel wiring for higher SPL


adulbrich

Lock up your daughters!
May 11, 2014
14,015
0
Ames, Iowa
If you have any corrections, please let me know. I just thought I'd share this with other people. I never knew it made a difference. Also, bump if you found it helpful!

Apparently, wiring in parallel instead of series is better (even to get same impedance).

Cliff notes for people who are annoyed by Showtime SPL, or are too lazy to watch the video:

Amp: 5000w RMS (50 amps and 100 volts)-

Example A) dual .5 coil wired in series to 1 ohm: each coil gets 50 amps and 50 volts

Example B) dual 2 coil wired in parallel to 1 ohm: each coil gets 25 amps and 100 volts

Both receive an equal amount of wattage. In example A, each coil receives more current, which builds more heat. The higher heat reduces the efficiency of the voice coil.

Faraday's law of induction also states that inductance in a series circuit is summed together. In parallel, it does not change. High amperage and low voltage will not make a s large of an electromagnetic field. A higher voltage will make the field larger.

He gained a few tenths in SPL by simply changing coil configuration.

Couldn't find a video section on the forum, so here's the video:

 
OP
adulbrich

adulbrich

Lock up your daughters!
May 11, 2014
14,015
0
Ames, Iowa
Both setups are 1 ohm final. There is just a difference in the ratio of amps to volts. In theory, it does make sense.

 

shizzzon

I am who you think I am
10+ year member
Apr 27, 2008
1,294
6
KY
Sorry, but even though his assumption is WAY Wrong, i decided to watch the video and had to stop it after he said the following-

5000w @1ohm is 100v and 50a.

Clearly whoever Showtime is does not know Ohm's law.

So, let me explain how this works-

Apparently, wiring in parallel instead of series is better (even to get same impedance).

Cliff notes for people who are annoyed by Showtime SPL, or are too lazy to watch the video:

"Amp: 5000w RMS (50 amps and 100 volts)- "

No it doesn't. That violates Ohm's Law.

5000w @1ohm is 70.7v and 70.7a

"Example A) dual .5 coil wired in series to 1 ohm: each coil gets 50 amps and 50 volts"

No it doesn't. That violates Ohms Law.

Each COIL will receive 70.7a and 35.35v.

"Example B) dual 2 coil wired in parallel to 1 ohm: each coil gets 25 amps and 100 volts"

No it doesn't. That violates Ohm's Law.

Each COIL will receive 70.7v and 35.35a.

"Both receive an equal amount of wattage."

This is the ONLY thing correct stated.

"In example A, each coil receives more current,"

No it doesn't. That violates Ohm's Law.

Each coil receives the same current.

"which builds more heat. The higher heat reduces the efficiency of the voice coil."

That would be true if it received more current but false in this fake scenario.

I'll show you a very simply analogy of how Showtime has no idea what they are talking about.

Take 10 batteries and series them all together.

What do you get?

Assuming each is 13.1v, you'd get 131v.

Now, let's say we were going to output 100A of current out of EACH battery IF they were in parallel.

In parallel, that's 10 batts at 13.1v each at 100A per batt.

So, that would be 13.1v and 1000A.

What is that in wattage?

13.1v x 1000A = 13,100w

Now, let's go in series-

131v

Well, how many amps will all 10 batteries put out?

100 AMPS ONLY!

Why?

131v x 100= 13,100w.

Current does NOT change in series.

Going by their understanding, they are expecting to PHYSICALLY gain energy by changing the wiring configuration to the same resistance.

That not only violates Ohm's Law but also the first and perhaps the second Law of Thermodynamics.

Misinformation sure does come from "trusted sources" nowadays it seems, smh..

 
OP
adulbrich

adulbrich

Lock up your daughters!
May 11, 2014
14,015
0
Ames, Iowa
Sorry, but even though his assumption is WAY Wrong, i decided to watch the video and had to stop it after he said the following-
5000w @1ohm is 100v and 50a.

Clearly whoever Showtime is does not know Ohm's law.

So, let me explain how this works-

Apparently, wiring in parallel instead of series is better (even to get same impedance).

Cliff notes for people who are annoyed by Showtime SPL, or are too lazy to watch the video:

"Amp: 5000w RMS (50 amps and 100 volts)- "

No it doesn't. That violates Ohm's Law.

5000w @1ohm is 70.7v and 70.7a

"Example A) dual .5 coil wired in series to 1 ohm: each coil gets 50 amps and 50 volts"

No it doesn't. That violates Ohms Law.

Each COIL will receive 70.7a and 35.35v.

"Example B) dual 2 coil wired in parallel to 1 ohm: each coil gets 25 amps and 100 volts"

No it doesn't. That violates Ohm's Law.

Each COIL will receive 70.7v and 35.35a.

"Both receive an equal amount of wattage."

This is the ONLY thing correct stated.

"In example A, each coil receives more current,"

No it doesn't. That violates Ohm's Law.

Each coil receives the same current.

"which builds more heat. The higher heat reduces the efficiency of the voice coil."

That would be true if it received more current but false in this fake scenario.

I'll show you a very simply analogy of how Showtime has no idea what they are talking about.

Take 10 batteries and series them all together.

What do you get?

Assuming each is 13.1v, you'd get 131v.

Now, let's say we were going to output 100A of current out of EACH battery IF they were in parallel.

In parallel, that's 10 batts at 13.1v each at 100A per batt.

So, that would be 13.1v and 1000A.

What is that in wattage?

13.1v x 1000A = 13,100w

Now, let's go in series-

131v

Well, how many amps will all 10 batteries put out?

100 AMPS ONLY!

Why?

131v x 100= 13,100w.

Current does NOT change in series.

Going by their understanding, they are expecting to PHYSICALLY gain energy by changing the wiring configuration to the same resistance.

That not only violates Ohm's Law but also the first and perhaps the second Law of Thermodynamics.

Misinformation sure does come from "trusted sources" nowadays it seems, smh..
Thanks! I wonder why he gained a few tenths in spl then

 

72Impala

CarAudio.com Elite
10+ year member
Mar 5, 2005
1,105
0
Clarksville, TN
I have always heard parallel is better than series due to heat induction as well. It makes sense honestly. Just like high voltage amplifiers are more efficient and send less heat to the subwoofers. Voltage is better than amperage. Maybe you won't gain SPL, but you may see less HEAT wiring in parralel. But I don't know this is not from 1st hand experience testing against each other so I cannot support this theory 100%

 

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