Do I need to upgrade my speakers??


StillLearning

CarAudio.com Newbie
Sep 5, 2019
6
0
Colorado
Hi all! This is my first thread and I am excited to get involved on this forum site.
I am posting here because I just upgraded my car subwoofer system's amplifier from a Sony XPLODE 1200W to a Audiopipe 1500W, I still have my old Kicker CompVR 07CVR124 subs wired to 2 ohms and on their own channel. After this change, my system started smelling pretty rough and I just assumed it was the new amp breaking in, but the smell is really strong and I am not sure if I need to upgrade my subs or not. The gain is at 1/4 of the way up and i have brought bass boost rather low, it sounds good and thumps but I am just worried about burning through my Kickers now.

What are your guys's thoughts on this?
 

BCotrell

Senior VIP Member
May 27, 2015
331
27
irvine, ca
How are they on their own channel when that amp is a monoblock? Also you have two dvc 4 ohm woofers. Your final wiring load should be 4 ohm or 1 ohm. The final 4 ohm should be good but the one ohm load might stress those subs out a bit. Get your sub wiring corrected
 
OP
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StillLearning

CarAudio.com Newbie
Sep 5, 2019
6
0
Colorado
BCortell, I guess that is a good point to bring up with it being a monoblock and all. so maybe its not 2 channels and I just dont completely understand my wiring scheme. Correct me if I am wrong here but if I have a dual voice coil at 4 oh,s and i wire it in parallel, that would cut the ohms in half to 2 ohm per sub right? I did this a brought a ohm meter and it read 1.8-2 ohms for each subwoofer. So maybe my wiring to my amp is incorrect? I attached a picture of the wires for reference and drew red and blue to show wires that come from the same sub. The following picture is from the amp manual, I switched my polarity and it sounds better because of the phase I think, but that shouldnt affect it burning or heating up right? Thanks for the thoughts

P.S. So I know the amp is a monoblock, but why are there 4 terminals then? If someone could fill me in on that I would appreciate the knowledge. Thnx
 

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danielbea122

CarAudio.com Well Known
Jul 29, 2019
175
11
Tampa
BCortell, I guess that is a good point to bring up with it being a monoblock and all. so maybe its not 2 channels and I just dont completely understand my wiring scheme. Correct me if I am wrong here but if I have a dual voice coil at 4 oh,s and i wire it in parallel, that would cut the ohms in half to 2 ohm per sub right? I did this a brought a ohm meter and it read 1.8-2 ohms for each subwoofer. So maybe my wiring to my amp is incorrect? I attached a picture of the wires for reference and drew red and blue to show wires that come from the same sub. The following picture is from the amp manual, I switched my polarity and it sounds better because of the phase I think, but that shouldnt affect it burning or heating up right? Thanks for the thoughts

P.S. So I know the amp is a monoblock, but why are there 4 terminals then? If someone could fill me in on that I would appreciate the knowledge. Thnx
The 4 terminals are connected internally I believe. It just to make it a little easier to connect.
 
OP
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StillLearning

CarAudio.com Newbie
Sep 5, 2019
6
0
Colorado
The 4 terminals are connected internally I believe. It just to make it a little easier to connect.
So that would mean there is no sound difference between using two terminals and 4 wires rather than all four terminals? I guess that's pretty much the definition of single channel, right? I was thinking more terminals would have better power distribution, but if they're all on the same node then it doesn't really matter... Something to test at least with a spare moment
 

danielbea122

CarAudio.com Well Known
Jul 29, 2019
175
11
Tampa
So that would mean there is no sound difference between using two terminals and 4 wires rather than all four terminals? I guess that's pretty much the definition of single channel, right? I was thinking more terminals would have better power distribution, but if they're all on the same node then it doesn't really matter... Something to test at least with a spare moment
Pretty sure it will sound the same.

Instead of you wiring the final step, the amp does it for ya. Simple as that.
 
OP
S

StillLearning

CarAudio.com Newbie
Sep 5, 2019
6
0
Colorado
Probably clipping them to death.
So my dual coil Subwoofers are rated at 50-400 (200 W per coil) Watts RMS each and since there are (2) that would make the higher RMS draw to be 800 Watts. The amp I am using is rated for 950 Watts continuous power output at 2 Ohms, clipping occurs from what I have seen when there is not enough power. I measured my Subwoofer resistance using an ohm-meter and it came out to be nearly 2 exactly, it seems like my wiring is good on the amp for 2 ohms, I think... Is anything I am saying contradicting or
 

Popwarhomie

Team Lethal Pressure
Jan 22, 2010
6,273
313
Florida
Impedance rise.
Voltage drop.
Amp doesn't actually do 950 rms at 2 ohms.
Clipping can be caused by many things.
 
OP
S

StillLearning

CarAudio.com Newbie
Sep 5, 2019
6
0
Colorado
Impedance rise.
Voltage drop.
Amp doesn't actually do 950 rms at 2 ohms.
Clipping can be caused by many things.
Thanks for the info, so basically anything that can muck up OHMs Law, do you have any ideas of diagnosing this? Off of above it sounds like a starting point is attempting to measure voltage and resistance while the sub is playing, I know my power source stays between 13.7 and 14.5 VDC so if there is a problem it might be internal to the amp
 
OP
S

StillLearning

CarAudio.com Newbie
Sep 5, 2019
6
0
Colorado
Hey all, just wanted to update on my situation because I think what I dealt with was something somewhat unique. I do believe I fixed my issue for the most part, I think it was the box I was using. The box I used is a bandpass box I got in 2010 and messed around with a Lot! This means I did stupid things like cut extra holes in the top to place a couple 6X9 speakers in so it would just be a 12V boom box. After realizing it wasn't the greatest idea I removed these and just screwed in a warped piece of wood over the top. There were also 2 other decent sized holes in the box along with the openings between the warped wood and box. I believe this created a subwoofer environment that is rather close to free air, which I didn't realize at first and I didn't realize how damaging such a thing can be to a subwoofer. I replaced this box over the weekend and its like a new car, it bumps way harder at lower volumes/gain, the smell has disappeared and everything sounds cleaner. A solid box is just as important as the amp and speaker itself now in my opinion.

That said, I have found that at low volume my sub now has a static fuzz to it and I think while playing it in "free air" I really screwed the integrity of the coils. I will be replacing my 12" CVR Kickers with a pair of SKAR VD-12 D4 12"" 800W Max subwoofers and fully expect to have clean clear bass. Once I install my new woofers I will send in a final post just cuz.
I appreciate everyone's input on this and think that the amount of free air or reliability of a sub box is something that is easily looked over and taken for granted and wanted to share my experience in case anyone else can relate.

Cheers
 

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