Subwoofer smell


Xkrtwi

CarAudio.com Newbie
Nov 21, 2020
14
1
Finland
I have a subwoofer that has 1000wrms dual vc connected to 2ohm. My amp gives 1700wrms 2ohm, i have my gain adjustet to the output voltage of 45volt. Today i played it at 43 volume on my headunit for about 25minutes the max is 63 but i dont go past that because of clipping. So the subwoofer gave a little voicecoil smell and the subwoofer felt little warm is it ok i think the sub havent played that hard before.
 
  • Haha
Reactions: Squirrel!

huberoy123

Member
Nov 6, 2013
410
59
Delaware
I have a subwoofer that has 1000wrms dual vc connected to 2ohm. My amp gives 1700wrms 2ohm, i have my gain adjustet to the output voltage of 45volt. Today i played it at 43 volume on my headunit for about 25minutes the max is 63 but i dont go past that because of clipping. So the subwoofer gave a little voicecoil smell and the subwoofer felt little warm is it ok i think the sub havent played that hard before.
Just keep an eye on it, and inspect it regularly. It's probably excess glue burning off.
 

Jeffdachef

Gunz That Turn on Nunz
5,000+ posts
Feb 5, 2013
18,546
798
South Coast Metro, CA
I have a subwoofer that has 1000wrms dual vc connected to 2ohm. My amp gives 1700wrms 2ohm, i have my gain adjustet to the output voltage of 45volt. Today i played it at 43 volume on my headunit for about 25minutes the max is 63 but i dont go past that because of clipping. So the subwoofer gave a little voicecoil smell and the subwoofer felt little warm is it ok i think the sub havent played that hard before.
Depends if your amp is a true 1700 rms amp. If its something overrated like a hifonics the you are most likely at soft clipping point. Warm is fine. Coil glue smell is fine. However, warm with coil smell together is a bad combo. So do some longer tests at the same level and make sure the warmness doesnt get any more than it currently is.
 

Bobbytwonames

Trigger Man!
5,000+ posts
Aug 28, 2018
5,327
310
Vegas
Depends if your amp is a true 1700 rms amp. If its something overrated like a hifonics the you are most likely at soft clipping point. Warm is fine. Coil glue smell is fine. However, warm with coil smell together is a bad combo. So do some longer tests at the same level and make sure the warmness doesnt get any more than it currently is.
Because everybody knows what coil glue smells like. And, make sure that the "warmness" stays the same. Can you define "warmness" for us Car Audio newbies, please? I'm still trying to learn all this stuff, thanks man! Appreciate all your help!
 

hispls

CarAudio.com Veteran
5,000+ posts
10+ year member
Sep 10, 2009
11,820
617
Central Maine
excess glue burning off.
Not sure where people come up with this idea. Coils are not build with excess "glue" that needs to be burned off, and I can't vouch for Chinese made coils, but the American ones I use are baked at 475 for 60 minutes at the factory for the final stage of production.

If your coil is getting smelly it means you're putting in too much power. This is never good for it and will shorten its life. That doesn't mean you can't do this regularly and still get an acceptable lifespan out of your sub but understand that you are reaching thermal limits when you can smell shit burning.
 

huberoy123

Member
Nov 6, 2013
410
59
Delaware
Not sure where people come up with this idea. Coils are not build with excess "glue" that needs to be burned off, and I can't vouch for Chinese made coils, but the American ones I use are baked at 475 for 60 minutes at the factory for the final stage of production.

If your coil is getting smelly it means you're putting in too much power. This is never good for it and will shorten its life. That doesn't mean you can't do this regularly and still get an acceptable lifespan out of your sub but understand that you are reaching thermal limits when you can smell shit burning.
No one said that coils had excess glue that had to be burnt off. The post was about a possible source for the smell. The idea comes from other folks who have had similar issues with coils smelling. Just a general internet search and prior posts on this site also addressed this as a possible cause. You might be right about putting too much power into the sub, However, remain open-minded as we don't know for sure what caused this particular sub to smell. There may have been some excess glue on the coil. I'm just saying.
 

hispls

CarAudio.com Veteran
5,000+ posts
10+ year member
Sep 10, 2009
11,820
617
Central Maine
No one said that coils had excess glue that had to be burnt off. The post was about a possible source for the smell. The idea comes from other folks who have had similar issues with coils smelling. Just a general internet search and prior posts on this site also addressed this as a possible cause. You might be right about putting too much power into the sub, However, remain open-minded as we don't know for sure what caused this particular sub to smell. There may have been some excess glue on the coil. I'm just saying.
Just because some people on the internet parrot some bullshit doesn't make it true. And yes, I can say with 100% certainty that if you're smelling something burning you are overpowering your speakers.

But if you're that committed to doubling down on this nonsense, tell us your theory about how much "excess glue" they put on a voice coil that we're supposed to be burning off, for bonus points you could explain why they use too much glue in the first place, as it seems the sort of waste that manufacturers look to avoid.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JakeW

huberoy123

Member
Nov 6, 2013
410
59
Delaware
Just because some people on the internet parrot some bullshit doesn't make it true. And yes, I can say with 100% certainty that if you're smelling something burning you are overpowering your speakers.

But if you're that committed to doubling down on this nonsense, tell us your theory about how much "excess glue" they put on a voice coil that we're supposed to be burning off, for bonus points you could explain why they use too much glue in the first place, as it seems the sort of waste that manufacturers look to avoid.
 

huberoy123

Member
Nov 6, 2013
410
59
Delaware
Do members get notified when you put them on your ignore list? I had to put someone on this post on my list the other day. If they reply with my quote, please let them know that I will not be getting their nonsensical, greater than thou responses. I love that feature.
 

huberoy123

Member
Nov 6, 2013
410
59
Delaware
Just keep an eye on it, and inspect it regularly. It's probably excess glue burning off.
I have a subwoofer that has 1000wrms dual vc connected to 2ohm. My amp gives 1700wrms 2ohm, i have my gain adjustet to the output voltage of 45volt. Today i played it at 43 volume on my headunit for about 25minutes the max is 63 but i dont go past that because of clipping. So the subwoofer gave a little voicecoil smell and the subwoofer felt little warm is it ok i think the sub havent played that hard before.
After researching further, let us know what you find.
 

Squirrel!

Curmudgeon
Feb 26, 2020
333
56
Ohio
Burning up that voice coil and former. LOL We all do it. Try some Pink Floyd if you really want to smell some burning ozone. LOL
 

SlugButter

CarAudio.com Elite
Nov 5, 2019
1,095
374
arizona
That’s one reason why I like ported boxes. I always tend to push my system to its limits, and I want to make sure I can smell it. I’m doing a 4th order now, so I won’t be able to smell if it’s burning up as easily. In hindsight, I wish I would have designed it with the magnet in the ported section, instead of the sealed side.
 

SlugButter

CarAudio.com Elite
Nov 5, 2019
1,095
374
arizona
My type Rs had an odor for a few months when I first installed them. I thought it was glue heating up, but it’s not. The mix of a newly built box and the smell of a new sub can have an odd smell, but it isn’t a burning smell. I thought that as well.
 
  • Like
Reactions: JakeW

audio_phill

Walking TSP Encyclopedia
10+ year member
Dec 21, 2008
1,574
22
Small Town VA
Different coil coatings smell differently. Lack of cooling can cause overheating. Movement restricted minimizes travels, reduces cooling. A 1700W @ 2 ohm amp is based on a non-reactive load and perfect voltage and @ who knows what freq. Your sub will have impedance rise from movement and restrictions in movement from an enclosure. Clipping and distortion are the biggest issues that cause heat. Your sub has more resistance @ Fs and at enclosure tuning. If Fb is @ Fs, then the load on the amp will be much higher than nominal/Re impedance and trying to get power from the amp will run it right into clipping.
 
  • Like
Reactions: huberoy123

mastershake575

CarAudio.com Veteran
Mar 11, 2015
593
127
Dallas
@ huberroy

For this board I would avoid blocking people since there' alot of back and forth dialog between topic creators and the users here (it will eventually cause confusion). There still going to quote you regardless so your better off just unblocking them and just not replying if the discussion doesn't interest you
 
  • Like
Reactions: huberoy123

onetime

CarAudio.com Newbie
Nov 28, 2020
13
-1
tn
I replaced one of my subs and the new one smelled for about a month but has not smelled since.
 

hispls

CarAudio.com Veteran
5,000+ posts
10+ year member
Sep 10, 2009
11,820
617
Central Maine
Do members get notified when you put them on your ignore list? I had to put someone on this post on my list the other day. If they reply with my quote, please let them know that I will not be getting their nonsensical, greater than thou responses. I love that feature.
So instead of either trying to find any reputable source to back up your excess glue claim just put your fingers in your ears, close your eyes and yell "nya nya nya I can't hear you".
Well done. Come back and let us know when you've finished burning off all the "excess glue" on your coils.
24439
 
  • Haha
Reactions: audiobaun

Buck

[email protected]
Pro Seller
5,000+ posts
10+ year member
May 19, 2008
23,721
1,080
FL
I have a subwoofer that has 1000wrms dual vc connected to 2ohm. My amp gives 1700wrms 2ohm, i have my gain adjustet to the output voltage of 45volt. Today i played it at 43 volume on my headunit for about 25minutes the max is 63 but i dont go past that because of clipping. So the subwoofer gave a little voicecoil smell and the subwoofer felt little warm is it ok i think the sub havent played that hard before.
There are, unfortunately, many songs that are super clipped. So even if you set it with a tone, your rca voltage may be even higher with a shitty rap producer who basically makes their bass-lines have square waves.
 

Buck

[email protected]
Pro Seller
5,000+ posts
10+ year member
May 19, 2008
23,721
1,080
FL
Different coil coatings smell differently. Lack of cooling can cause overheating. Movement restricted minimizes travels, reduces cooling. A 1700W @ 2 ohm amp is based on a non-reactive load and perfect voltage and @ who knows what freq. Your sub will have impedance rise from movement and restrictions in movement from an enclosure. Clipping and distortion are the biggest issues that cause heat. Your sub has more resistance @ Fs and at enclosure tuning. If Fb is @ Fs, then the load on the amp will be much higher than nominal/Re impedance and trying to get power from the amp will run it right into clipping.
Do you mean mechanical or electrical resistance? That's why we have Qts values divided into Qes and Qms.

Playing at tuning with a good box, what you've said doesn't totally check out with me. Sub only has more resistance @ Fs if it's in not in an enclosure. Enclosure tuning largely overrides Fs. Fs still determines the nature of a woofer, but how a ported box loads has immensely more effect on how the woofer plays than Fs ever will, and electrical strain from amp.

If playing at tuning frequency made you clip, then why are most people's charging voltages so much better with a ported box around tuning frequency? Real world doesn't quite back that up, respectfully, IMO.

The further away from box tuning you play, typically the worse your voltage usage by your amp becomes, and that's when you run into clipping is when you voltage drop. Playing a ported box @ it's tuned frequency, maybe +2 hz above, is literally the most efficient note you're going to play, typically, in a vehicle. Vehicle resonances can cause a secondary peak away from box frequency, so the vehicle cabin will play a large role in how badly your sub unloads playing away from tuning frequency. Playing away from tuning frequency really increases electrical load, that's where an amp with a great dampening factor comes in. The unloading of the woofer means the woofer tends to move further, which means the feedback of the coil moving through the magnetic field of the motor is going to INCREASE. The coil is able to force electricity back into the amp way more when the woofer unloads. A lot of amps can't handle that. You will see a MASSIVE increase in voltage consumption whenever your woofer begins unloading from playing too far away from port frequency. My elemental designs 9.1's could. Dampening factor of 250? iirc. I had a hard time bottoming out my sub DC XL 18's. Fs of like 32-35 hz. Vb 13, Fb 29 [email protected] 12.3 in^2 per cube port area. I could play lower than I could hear. I could do a 145 @ 27 hz (2400 watts rated), 149.3 @ 34-35 (vehicle resonance + sub Fs). Smaller port increase mechanical resistance, but you want to that a large extent with musical boxes.

Air/mechanical load and electrical load have different factors to it. Both change the increased live-time resistances (reactive load) as you're playing. The more an enclosure loads, typically the more efficient it is. That's why 4th and 6th order bandpasses are so loud between their bandwidth is because it's basically DOUBLE mechanical loading. The higher pressure the air inside of the enclosure, typically the better the woofer plays musically. A SPL one note wonder may be really efficient at one note, you know, big port, exact best air volume inside. But musically? Medium-ish sized boxes tend to play the best ported on music, with slightly above the smallest port area you can get away with, because it keeps the enclosure pressurized and the cone loaded across the widest frequency bandwith. So that means the woofer xmax will be more controlled, which means you electrical resistance is going to be more consistent. But you want a high mechnical load, lol, that's how you produce louder bass waves. If you want a loud daily system. you want to keep your woofer air/mechanically loaded across the widest frequency bandwidth that you can.

I double dog dare you to play full volume sine wave at ported box tuning frequency and then play full volume at 1.5 octaves above your tuning frequency, and tell me which one kills your woofer first. Or try to play 10-15 hz below tuning frequency and tell me if your voltage is better than at tuning frequency.

All in all, it doesn't matter what your reactive electrical/resistance load is for music; you shouldn't make your daily enclosure based around having a low resistance to electricity as your woofer plays. It matters how loud your sub is, at the end of the day.
 

audio_phill

Walking TSP Encyclopedia
10+ year member
Dec 21, 2008
1,574
22
Small Town VA
Port area should be decided by Qes and Vas, you paraphrased and oddly elaborated on my previous comment. Higher freq can build heat due to reducing cooling from travel, The more effective the enclosure acoustically couples with its surrounding space the more efficient it is. Hence the horn.
 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.


Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 2)



Latest posts

Newest threads

Most posts - Past 30 days

Latest classifieds