Jump to content


itln.stln

Sound Dampening inside doors

Recommended Posts

Is it worth the trouble of trying to install sound dampening inside the actual door? I've watched some videos and I've seen quite a few people install the dampener inside the door behind the speaker. I know SecondSkin has the speaker pads that you are supposed to install directly behind the speaker to help deflect the sound waves from bouncing back toward the speaker, and that's not what I'm talking about. Also if it is recommended to install dampener inside the door should I be concerned about the extra weight on the door hinge or will it not matter?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Is it worth the trouble of trying to install sound dampening inside the actual door? I've watched some videos and I've seen quite a few people install the dampener inside the door behind the speaker. I know SecondSkin has the speaker pads that you are supposed to install directly behind the speaker to help deflect the sound waves from bouncing back toward the speaker, and that's not what I'm talking about. Also if it is recommended to install dampener inside the door should I be concerned about the extra weight on the door hinge or will it not matter?

 

A well treated door can make a meh speaker sound great and a great speaker sound amazing. However, I just want to preface this by saying if you have stock, non amp'd speakers then treating your doors probably isn't worth the hassle.

 

I've never done just dampener, but I've done it in tangent with other treatments and the sound quality and midbass noticeably improved. I do dampener, insulating tiles for sound absorption, then close the access holes with sheet metal, then more tiles. Then I should do mass loaded vinyl with a decoupler, but I skimped. It's very labor intensive, but well worth it. If you're interested, check out KHA's build log: http://www.caraudio.com/forums/car-audio-build-logs-cars-trucks-suvs/608637-2014-accord-sport-sq-build-keep_hope_alive.html.

 

Just installing dampener is certainly a move in the right direction and should theoretically improve midbass. The most efficient way to put the tiles in is with the bulk of it towards the center of the problem areas. SDS goes into this in detail. Even if you completely covered the door I think the hinges could take it. If you're doing several layers then it could become an issue.


My Minivan Setup:

 

  • Head Unit: Kenwood KDC-BT852HD
  • Speakers: 4 Pioneer TS-D6902R coaxials on 2 SONY Xplod XM-1002HXs (The old school, made in Japan ones), ~100W RMS @ 4Ω to each
  • Subwoofers: 2 Rockford Fosgate P210S8 10"s in a custom 2.75ft³ ported enclosure tuned to 35Hz on a Kenwood KAC-9103D, ~400W RMS @ 4Ω to the pair

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Umbra, thanks for the quick reply. I'm definitely not going to be running stock speakers and they will be amped. I'm going to be running polk db5251 in front and db571 in the rear, all going through a kicker cx300.4. I'm also going to be running an old 12" Alpine Type X sub I had laying around through a Kicker cx600.1, I know it's underpowered but it will work for now. I'm planning on covering as much as I can and as much it makes sense with SecondSkin sound dampener materials to quiet down the car rattles and provide clean sound.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Umbra, thanks for the quick reply. I'm definitely not going to be running stock speakers and they will be amped. I'm going to be running polk db5251 in front and db571 in the rear, all going through a kicker cx300.4. I'm also going to be running an old 12" Alpine Type X sub I had laying around through a Kicker cx600.1, I know it's underpowered but it will work for now. I'm planning on covering as much as I can and as much it makes sense with SecondSkin sound dampener materials to quiet down the car rattles and provide clean sound.
It sounds like a solid system and I wish you luck with it. The dampener will help reduce panel resonance, but you'll most likely still have rattling. The rattling will come from two materials in close proximity to one another smacking together from the bass. You'll need to track these down and address them one by one. I've used closed cell, adhesive weatherstripping foam to great success. You can find it in hardware stores. It costs a few bucks and is typically used for thermal insulation around windows. Here's a link: Frost King E/O 3/4 in. x 7/16 in. x 10 ft. Black High-Density Rubber Foam Weatherstrip Tape-R734H - The Home Depot. You stick it between the pieces to keep them separate. If you have a trunk try putting some around the latch where it closes, it'll help keep the entire lid from jumping around.

My Minivan Setup:

 

  • Head Unit: Kenwood KDC-BT852HD
  • Speakers: 4 Pioneer TS-D6902R coaxials on 2 SONY Xplod XM-1002HXs (The old school, made in Japan ones), ~100W RMS @ 4Ω to each
  • Subwoofers: 2 Rockford Fosgate P210S8 10"s in a custom 2.75ft³ ported enclosure tuned to 35Hz on a Kenwood KAC-9103D, ~400W RMS @ 4Ω to the pair

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Umbra, thanks again for the response, you actually answered another question I had in regards to the tape to use to reduce rattles. I knew I came to the right place for audio information.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You need absorption material to treat the rear wave. Something insulating and sound absorbent Like the material used in that build log umbra listed. Seriously check that out and actually read the theory and the resoning of why the acoustical engineer does the things he does in his install.


09 Sienna Subs : Four Team Ascendant 18s......Sub amp: Two Taramps 15k

Headunit: Pioneer 80PRS......Mids/Highs two pioneer gm 8604 bridged, one at 4 ohms bridged one at 2 ohms bridged, one ppi 600.2 for tweets.

Front stage: Two PWX 10s per door midbass only....... PRV 6MR500 midrange....... Massive CT 2 german tweeters.

320 amp Singer alt....... 1 group 34 under the hood 6 group31 agms in the back 560 amp hours total.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, you should be laying damping mat on the outer door skin. Cover as much as you can reach with one layer. Deflex pads or anything by another name that's claimed to bounce sound away from the speaker is not likely to help. The entire door will be bouncing sound, not just right behind the speaker.

 

I've used bagged fiberglass insulation hung inside the doors, and I later changed this to acoustic suspension ceiling tiles. I wasn't able to make before and after measurements but audibly it improved midbass and midrange clarity.


Barry Schanz Enterprises, LLC

dba Rubyserv Mobile Audio Systems

Founder of Students of Mobile Audio training

Setting Crossovers

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create a free account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's free & easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×