Solder vs crimp.


Mayhem

Tiddies
Feb 25, 2017
752
1
Gainesville, VA
I have both done in with my build.

Neither of which have failed or came off on me yet.

It will fail is if you don't solder it correctly. You have the let the solder "soak in" with the wire and the lug and then cap it.

There is a possibility of the solder melting because of the heat of the wire.

Cost is also a factor, depending on the crimper you get, it could be a lot cheaper to a map gas torch and some solder.

Some of those crimpers are expensive.

If you crimp you're doing a direct connection with the wire and the lug.

Crimping is 100 times easier to do than soldering.

Picked up one of those yellow 20 ton hydraulic crimpers. I think it was on ebay for under $30.

Works great and thats all I use now.

This is specifically going for larger gauge wire. All the small wire connections I have to do are soldered (10 gauge and up)

 

Popwarhomie

Team Lethal Pressure
Jan 22, 2010
6,398
335
Florida
I used to always solder mine. But its so much easier to crimp them. I just used a cheap $20 hammer crimper now.

 

Popwarhomie

Team Lethal Pressure
Jan 22, 2010
6,398
335
Florida
That's what I have but wire always comes loose. Maybe a little solder and hammer crimp??
If your wire comes loose after a hammer crimp you either need to start going to the gym or get a bigger hammer.

 

audiobaun

CarAudio.com Veteran
Jun 28, 2011
10,154
120
USA
Ive always used a hammer and the concrete floor..Then take a punch and make three indentions on both sides and use heat shrink for a final finish.I have never had any wiring come loose and Always had a hell of a sturdy connection.Never an issue coming apart

 

Boomin_tahoe

Hurtin' feelings errrday.
10+ year member
Jul 24, 2005
15,283
137
WA
If your wire comes loose after a hammer crimp you either need to start going to the gym or get a bigger hammer.
I got a chuckle from this.

 

Boomin_tahoe

Hurtin' feelings errrday.
10+ year member
Jul 24, 2005
15,283
137
WA
I actually machined something from some aluminum I have stashed in my garage. Made a "V" block, to rest the lugs onto and another piece of aluminum with chamfered sides to hammer down the lugs. So far isn't a bad idea really.

 

Boomin_tahoe

Hurtin' feelings errrday.
10+ year member
Jul 24, 2005
15,283
137
WA
EXO made a vid on Youtube long time ago about this and he used a manual hammer type crimper.....even showed himself hanging onto the wire while crimped side hanging on a big pillar!

 

wingless

Member
Sep 16, 2016
59
0
Florida
For mine, the main radio plug was mated to the Metra 70-1817 Receiver Wiring Harness. The splices are staggered by about 1", in three groups, so that all the splices DO NOT happen at the same position. I use soldered Western Union splices, covered w/ adhesive-lined heat shrink tubing. (Never apply too much solder that wicks up under the insulation, making the wire stiff.) All of the wires are labeled for function. I use my Brady IDxpert, in these cases printing on shrink tubing or on adhesive self-laminating label stock.













The objective for a proper crimp is to use the connector barrel and the crimp tool to deform / reshape the parts from individual conductor strands surrounded by air to a homogenous mass, devoid of air, as-shown in these images.





My experience w/ the hammer tool is that it has not provided acceptable results, so I've discontinued usage and instead use high-quality crimp tools.

All of the finished crimp images from those inexpensive hydraulic tools that I have seen look horrible. They look like the crimp die sizes are totally wrong and inappropriate for the crimp connectors.

The connector manufacturers have detailed specifications for the crimp to attain acceptable results. The inexpensive tools frequently fail to satisfy the specified crimp requirements.

 

wingless

Member
Sep 16, 2016
59
0
Florida
For larger wires, like 2/0 of 4/0, the tool I use is the T&B TBM6 w/ appropriately-sized dies, as-shown in these images. This is a high-quality, heavy-duty tool that is very versatile, w/ many different die sets available for different crimp applications.







For medium sized crimp, from 2 AWG to 8 AWG, the tool I use is the Molex 64001-3900D Crimp Tool. This is a high-quality, heavy-duty tool that provides an excellent crimp.







The tool I use for right angle flag crimp connectors, from 22 AWG to 14 AWG is the Panduit CT-300-1 Crimp Tool.





For the standard red / blue / yellow crimp connectors, for 22 AWG to 10 AWG, I use the Xcelite ECP-100 Crimp Tool.





 

wew lad

wew lad inc
Mar 22, 2015
5,811
81
MA
hammer or pneumatic crimp for large cables or gtfo

small splices are best soldered long term imo, biggest problem is the solder joint flexing and breaking off

crimps work just as well if you get the right size, and use the right crimping tool. it becomes a pain as you get smaller because of so many sizes so most people use a crimp much larger than the wire and it creates problems

 

Boomin_tahoe

Hurtin' feelings errrday.
10+ year member
Jul 24, 2005
15,283
137
WA
For larger wires, like 2/0 of 4/0, the tool I use is the T&B TBM6 w/ appropriately-sized dies, as-shown in these images. This is a high-quality, heavy-duty tool that is very versatile, w/ many different die sets available for different crimp applications.






For medium sized crimp, from 2 AWG to 8 AWG, the tool I use is the Molex 64001-3900D Crimp Tool. This is a high-quality, heavy-duty tool that provides an excellent crimp.







The tool I use for right angle flag crimp connectors, from 22 AWG to 14 AWG is the Panduit CT-300-1 Crimp Tool.





For the standard red / blue / yellow crimp connectors, for 22 AWG to 10 AWG, I use the Xcelite ECP-100 Crimp Tool.









I noticed your bigger wire 2/0 shows some of the wire exposed....you never wanna see that. make it short but not too short so it fits into the lug properly, then wrap it all up in a heat shrink tubing.

I still say hydraulic crimping is the best with the right tools/dies....but there are other alternatives if one isn't feasible.

 

Boomin_tahoe

Hurtin' feelings errrday.
10+ year member
Jul 24, 2005
15,283
137
WA
For mine, the main radio plug was mated to the Metra 70-1817 Receiver Wiring Harness. The splices are staggered by about 1", in three groups, so that all the splices DO NOT happen at the same position. I use soldered Western Union splices, covered w/ adhesive-lined heat shrink tubing. (Never apply too much solder that wicks up under the insulation, making the wire stiff.) All of the wires are labeled for function. I use my Brady IDxpert, in these cases printing on shrink tubing or on adhesive self-laminating label stock.













The objective for a proper crimp is to use the connector barrel and the crimp tool to deform / reshape the parts from individual conductor strands surrounded by air to a homogenous mass, devoid of air, as-shown in these images.





My experience w/ the hammer tool is that it has not provided acceptable results, so I've discontinued usage and instead use high-quality crimp tools.

All of the finished crimp images from those inexpensive hydraulic tools that I have seen look horrible. They look like the crimp die sizes are totally wrong and inappropriate for the crimp connectors.

The connector manufacturers have detailed specifications for the crimp to attain acceptable results. The inexpensive tools frequently fail to satisfy the specified crimp requirements.
And this is coming from a guy who puts subs in the rear doors of a car.

You took a lot of time and effort to go great lengths on detailing/labeling each wire and it's function. That to me is unnecessary as for the rest of us since we have them pretty much memorized. Also....I myself would rather use a butt connector in between wires AND heat shrink tubing...give it that nice watertight look to it.

I still say hydraulic crimping is the best with the right tools/dies....but there are other alternatives if one isn't feasible.

 

wingless

Member
Sep 16, 2016
59
0
Florida
I still say hydraulic crimping is the best with the right tools/dies.
Please post elusive unicorn images of the $30 eBay hydraulic tool making acceptable crimps.

And this is coming from a guy who puts subs in the rear doors of a car.
Thanks for the helpful juvenile comments.
 

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