Random Picture Thread


OP
Slo_Ride

Slo_Ride

Regulator
10+ year member
Oct 15, 2005
20,136
707
ATLANTA
Scientists have discovered a black hole so massive that, in theory, it shouldn't exist. It's a stellar black hole — the type that forms after stars die, collapse, and explode. Researchers had previously believed that the size limit was no more than 20 times the mass of our sun because as these stars die, they lose most of their mass through explosions that expel matter and gas swept away by stellar winds. This theory has now been toppled by LB-1, the newly-discovered black hole with a mass that is 70 times greater than our sun, according to a press release from the Chinese Academy of Sciences.

 
OP
Slo_Ride

Slo_Ride

Regulator
10+ year member
Oct 15, 2005
20,136
707
ATLANTA
Ok explain to me why it does.
More than fifty years of human activity in space have produced societal benefits that improve the quality of life on Earth. The first satellites, designed to study the space environment and test initial capabilities in Earth orbit, contributed critical knowledge and capabilities for developing satellite telecommunications, global positioning, and advances in weather forecasting. Space exploration initiated the economic development of space that today, year after year, delivers high returns for invested funds in space. The challenges of space exploration have sparked new scientific and technological knowledge of inherent value to humankind, leading to better understanding of our Universe and the solar system in which we live. Knowledge, coupled with ingenuity, provides people around the globe with solutions as well as useful products and services. Knowledge acquired from space exploration has also introduced new perspectives on our individual and collective place in the Universe. Future space exploration goals call for sending humans and robots beyond Low Earth Orbit and establishing sustained access to destinations such as the Moon, asteroids and Mars. Space agencies participating in the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG)2 are discussing an international approach for achieving these goals, documented in ISECG's Global Exploration Roadmap3. That approach begins with the International Space Station (ISS), and leads to human missions to the surface of Mars. Employing the complementary capabilities of both humans and robotic systems will enable humankind to meet this most ambitious space exploration challenge, and to increase benefits for society. These benefits can be categorized into three fundamental areas: innovation; culture and inspiration; and new means to address global challenges. Innovation. There are numerous cases of societal benefits linked to new knowledge and technology from space exploration. Space exploration has contributed to many diverse aspects of everyday life, from solar panels to implantable heart monitors, from cancer therapy to lightweight materials, and from water‐purification systems to improved computing systems and to a global search‐and‐rescue system. Achieving the ambitious future exploration goals as outlined above will further expand the economic relevance of space. Space exploration will continue to be an essential driver for opening up new domains in science and technology, triggering other sectors to partner with the space sector for joint research and development. This will return immediate benefits back to Earth in areas such as materials, power generation and energy storage, recycling and waste management, advanced robotics, health and medicine, transportation, engineering, computing and software. Furthermore, innovations required for space exploration, such as those related to miniaturisation, will drive improvements in other space systems and services resulting in higher performance and lower cost. These will in turn result in better services on Earth and better return of investment in institutional and commercial space activities. In addition, the excitement generated by space exploration attracts young people to careers in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, helping to build global capacity for scientific and technological innovation. Culture and Inspiration. Space exploration offers a unique and evolving perspective on humanity's place in the Universe, which is common to all. Every day, space exploration missions fulfill people's curiosity, producing fresh data about the solar system that brings us closer to answering profound questions that have been asked for millennia: What is the nature of the Universe? Is the destiny of humankind bound to Earth? Are we and our planet unique? Is there life elsewhere in the Universe? New Means to Address Global Challenges. Partnerships and capabilities developed through space exploration create new opportunities for addressing global challenges. Space exploration is a global endeavour contributing to trust and diplomacy between nations. Enhanced global partnerships and exploration capabilities may help advance international preparedness for protecting the Earth from catastrophic events such as some asteroid strikes, advancing collaborative research on space weather and protecting spacecraft by developing new means for space debris removal. Knowledge derived from space exploration may also contribute to implementing policies for environmentally sustainable development. In summary, space scientists and engineers who overcame past challenges could not have predicted all the ways in which their innovations are now being used on Earth. Though the precise nature of future benefits from space exploration is unpredictable, current trends suggest that significant benefits may be generated in areas such as new materials, health and medicine, transportation, and computer technology. New opportunities for job creation and economic growth are being created by private enterprises that are increasingly investing in space exploration and seeking ways to make space exploration more affordable and reliable, and thus, more sustainable and profitable. There is no activity on Earth that matches the unique challenges of space exploration. The first fifty years of space activity have generated benefits for people around the globe. This past record gives strong reason for confidence that renewed investments in space exploration will have similarly positive impacts for future generations.
 
Last edited:
OP
Slo_Ride

Slo_Ride

Regulator
10+ year member
Oct 15, 2005
20,136
707
ATLANTA
For more than fifty years, humans have explored space, and this has produced a continuing flow of societal benefits. By its very nature, space exploration expands the envelope of human knowledge and presence throughout the solar system, and this process has been accelerated by a combination of human and robotic activities. Experience has demonstrated that, as long as humankind addresses the challenges of exploring mankind’s common frontier of space, many tangible societal benefits are produced, and in addition to those most commonly anticipated, a great variety of valuable innovations are generated serendipitously, for this is the nature of discovery. From the early days of space flight, it became apparent that space exploration was an efficient driver for basic science and technology. The new challenges called for new approaches. The cost of launches drove designers to make spacecraft computers lighter, smaller and with the highest performance and dependability. Solar cells, batteries and fuel cells were driven by space needs and benefitted many sectors on Earth. The first satellites, designed to study the space environment and test initial capabilities in Earth orbit, contributed critical knowledge for developing space telecommunications, global positioning, and advances in weather forecasting. The early missions also formed the technological basis for advanced space exploration, enabling the first robotic and human missions to the Moon, as well as highly capable planetary spacecraft and crewed space stations in orbit. Over time, governments around the world increasingly cooperated to conduct complex space missions, demonstrating the power of international partnerships to amplify accomplishments in space. The success has been impressive and space systems continue to drive innovation, support world‐class science, provide vital services, and are part of the daily life of the common citizen. Service‐driven space systems are the overwhelming part of space activity today. Furthermore, the legacy of these historical efforts to develop sophisticated and useful capabilities and partnerships is evident in today's exploration programmes such as the International Space Station (ISS), which continues to contribute significant benefits to humanity. The ISS supports investigations in life and physical sciences, as well as advancing research and technology to solve problems associated with long‐duration human space flight that have many applications on the ground. Future space exploration goals call for sending humans and robots beyond Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and establishing sustained access to space exploration destinations such as the Moon, asteroids and Mars. Space agencies participating in the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) are discussing an international approach for achieving these goals, documented in ISECG's Global Exploration Roadmap, that begins with the ISS and advances coordinated human and robotic exploration, leading, amongst other things, to human missions on the surface of Mars. Achieving these ambitious exploration goals requires researchers to surmount new challenges and develop coordinated human and robotic exploration capabilities. As has been demonstrated in the past, deploying the unique and complementary capabilities of both humans and robotic space systems is not only essential for solar system exploration, but also promises to expand many benefits provided to people on Earth. While early space scientists and engineers expected that space exploration would have positive impacts on humanity, they could not have foreseen all the specific social and economic benefits that have flowed from their work. So too, the current generation cannot predict in detail what benefits will eventually appear as a result of its efforts The unforeseen positive results of the past five decades indicate the great potential for space exploration to continue producing a wide range of applications and knowledge which will expand the space‐based economy even further. This paper, a collective effort by representatives of space agencies participating in ISECG, articulates a shared perspective on the nature and significance of the benefits of space exploration programmes, and on the potential for the future delivery of benefits. It summarizes the fundamental benefits to humanity which could arise as space agencies collectively work on achieving the ambitious future exploration goals outlined above. It also provides a perspective on potential specific benefits to be achieved over the next ten years. While this paper is not meant to provide a conclusive view on the societal relevance of future space exploration, it documents a strong commitment of space agencies to deliver benefits to society. It will aid space agencies in engaging relevant stakeholder communities in discussions on how the flow of benefits to society can be further improved.
 
OP
Slo_Ride

Slo_Ride

Regulator
10+ year member
Oct 15, 2005
20,136
707
ATLANTA
To a great extent, the benefits from space exploration are rooted in the generation of new knowledge, which is the first reward and which has inherent value to humankind. Technological knowledge, generated when high‐performance space systems are developed to address the extreme challenges of space missions, yields many innovations that benefit the public. Scientific knowledge acquired from space expands humankind's understanding of nature and frequently unlocks creative and useful Earth‐based applications for society. In the longer term, the knowledge accumulated over many missions and the expansion of human presence into the Solar System help people gain perspective on the fragility and rarity of life in the Universe and on humankind's accomplishments, potential, and destiny. Space exploration stimulates the creation of both tangible and intangible benefits for humanity. Tangible impacts include all the innovation‐related applications and benefits resulting from investments in these programmes, such as new devices and services that spin off into the marketplace. In addition, space exploration leads to advances in science and technology, and furthers workforce development and industrial capabilities, thus leading to an overall stimulation of private companies and industries, all of which contributes significantly to the economic progress of space‐faring nations. Space exploration is also known to attract young people into careers in science and technology to the general benefit of society and the economy. Space exploration also results in various intangible impacts due to the social and philosophical dimensions that address the nature and meaning of human life. Intangible benefits include the enriching of culture, the inspiration of citizens, and the building of mutual understanding as a result of international cooperation among space‐faring nations. The fundamental benefits generated by space exploration are grouped in this document as follows: innovation; culture and inspiration; and new means to address global challenges. The delivery of these benefits to society provides the main rationale for investment in space exploration. An illustration on how these benefits are delivered by space agencies is given in the box below. Space exploration’s capacity to continue delivering significant benefits to humanity was recognized by high‐level government representatives from around the world when they convened in Lucca, Italy, in November 2011. They concluded that space exploration provides: unprecedented opportunities to deliver benefits to humanity on Earth … These benefits include fuelling future discoveries; addressing global challenges in space and on Earth through the use of innovative technology; creating global partnerships by sharing challenging and peaceful goals; inspiring society and especially the younger generations through collective and individual efforts; and enabling economic expansion and new business opportunities. Overcoming the challenges of working in space has led to many technological and scientific advances that have provided benefits to society on Earth in areas including health and medicine, transportation, public safety, consumer goods, energy and environment, information technology, and industrial productivity. The wider list of technological benefits encompasses improved solar panels, implantable heart monitors, light‐based anti‐cancer therapy, cordless tools, light‐ weight high‐temperature alloys used in jet engine turbines, cameras found in today's cell phones, compact purification systems, waterglobal search‐and‐rescue systems and biomedical technologies. People often ask, If you like spin‐off products, why not just invest in those technologies straightaway, instead of waiting for them to happen as spin‐offs? The answer: it just doesn't work that way. Let's say you’re a thermodynamicist, the world's expert on heat, and I ask you to build me a better oven. You might invent a convection oven, or an oven that’s more insulated or that permits easier access to its contents. But no matter how much money I give you, you will not invent a microwave oven. Because that came from another place. It came from investments in communications, in radar. The microwave oven is traceable to the war effort, not to a thermodynamicist. Neil deGrasse Tyson, Space Chronicles, W.W.Norton & Company, 2012, p.210. Scientific research founded on data from space is also leading to discoveries with benefits for life on Earth. Ongoing research in the space environment of the ISS – in areas such as human physiology, plant biology, materials science, and fundamental physics – continues to yield insights that benefit society. For example, studies of the human body’s response to extended periods in the microgravity environment of the ISS are improving our understanding of the aging process. Fundamental scientific studies of the Martian environment, its evolution and current state represent important benchmarks of terrestrial planetary evolution, and hence, provide a model that some scientists believe will aid our growing understanding of climate change processes on Earth.
 
OP
Slo_Ride

Slo_Ride

Regulator
10+ year member
Oct 15, 2005
20,136
707
ATLANTA
Space exploration has produced an impressive record of benefits for humanity. This paper has distilled a body of evidence of such benefits into a few key observations about the capacity of future space exploration to contribute to innovation, culture and inspiration, and new means to address global challenges. Space exploration has driven scientific and technological innovation that benefits people around the globe every day. Sending humans and machines into space presents challenges that are overcome only by the utmost ingenuity; this leads to new knowledge and technical innovations that are used on Earth in ways that can be dramatic and unpredictable. Space exploration serves a cultural and inspirational purpose by fulfilling a deep need to understand the world, address questions about the origins of life and the nature of the Universe, and to expand the notion of what it means to be human. Because space exploration stimulates significant global investment and international partnerships, and because of its extremely challenging nature, demands the development of cutting edge technical capabilities, it provides unique opportunities to address some of the global challenges facing society today. When nations work together on challenging space missions, this promotes international cooperation beyond the realm of space. It aligns interests and forges relationships that further peace and stability on Earth. There is no activity on Earth that matches the unique challenges of space exploration. The first fifty years of space activity have generated benefits for people around the globe. This past record gives strong reason for confidence that renewed investments in space exploration will have similarly positive impacts for future generations.
 
OP
Slo_Ride

Slo_Ride

Regulator
10+ year member
Oct 15, 2005
20,136
707
ATLANTA
The oldest living things on Earth:⁣
The Yareta or llareta, bright green blobs that resemble moss-covered boulders, are actually flowering shrubs perfectly designed to withstand the high-altitude conditions of the Andes Mountains in Peru, Bolivia, northern Chile and western Argentina. The largest shrubs are approximately 3,000 years old.⁣


Methuselah, a bristlecone pine in the White Mountains of California, is the oldest single tree on Earth at the ripe old age of about 5,000, making it the oldest known non-cloned organism on Earth. Its exact location is a guarded secret, but hikers can wander by its ancient peers.⁣


A sprawling sea grass meadow 10 miles long near Spain ranks as the oldest known single organism on Earth, according to geneticists. One patch is estimated at 200,000 years old.⁣
 
OP
Slo_Ride

Slo_Ride

Regulator
10+ year member
Oct 15, 2005
20,136
707
ATLANTA
My man Colin Cowherd finally joined IG yesterday and it's everything I dreamed it would be!

 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.


Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 31)



Trending topics

Latest classifieds