How much deadener do you really need?

Original wis

CarAudio.com Recruit
Feb 26, 2022
47
18
So I have a 2001 Nissan Sentra GXE.



I'm putting four CT Sounds Strato 10's on a Smart 5 eventually.

For now I'm putting four CT Sounds Tropo 10's on a Smart 3 in the trunk.

The front doors will have Hertz Dieci DSK 165.3 components with the tweeters being fabricated into the sail panels.

The kick panels will have Hertz Dieci DCX 87.3 coaxials fabricated into them.

The rear deck will have Hertz Dieci DCX 165.3 coaxials.



My goal is to have a daily driver SQL build. I want a good amount of clarity but I also want to be able to get really loud.



My questions are:



1. How much of the surface area in the doors the roof the trunk and the floor do I need to cover to realistically get a good result? Do I need to spend a bunch of money to cover every single inch of the car like I see them do on the YouTube videos?



2. Do I really need to get like 90 or 120 mil? Is there anything really wrong with 50 mil?



3. Will covering more area with 50 mil give the same result as covering a smaller area in 80 mil?



4. If I cover the floor beneath the carpet with closed cell foam do I still need to put the regular sound deadener there too? The new carpet that I bought has a pretty thick layer of cushion below it and I'm worried that with the closed cell foam it might raise it up up too high if I add the regular deadener too.



5. I reupholstered the rear deck cover. I'm planning on covering the rear deck metal with sound deadener before I put it back in. Will that keep the rear deck from rattling or do I need to actually cover the bottom of the rear deck and the metal?



6. Any other advice that I may have missed or you can help me out with?



Thank you for taking the time to read this and respond.



Lewis King
 

Original wis

CarAudio.com Recruit
Feb 26, 2022
47
18
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #2
So I did the back deck to see how it would come out this is my first time ever doing sound better here's some pictures of the results. 20220805_183704.jpg 20220805_183702.jpg 20220805_183656.jpg 20220805_183653.jpg 20220805_183649.jpg

Would anyone like to provide any tips or feedback?

Thank you
 
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ThxOne

AudioFreak
5,000+ posts
Jun 8, 2018
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So I did the back deck to see how it would come out this is my first time ever doing sound better here's some pictures of the results. View attachment 41102 View attachment 41103 View attachment 41104 View attachment 41105 View attachment 41106

Would anyone like to provide any tips or feedback?

Thank you
That looks so similar to my 06 Elantra. If it acts the same your headliner/roof will need deadening and go ahead and do the trunk lid and license plate area. The more deadening the better. 4-10's, she's gonna rattle.
 
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hispls

CarAudio.com Veteran
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Sep 10, 2009
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I believe it has been proven that you get very diminishing returns from multiple layers or 100% coverage. Strategic placement on the largest and thinnest areas will give you the most improvement then save some for problem areas that reveal themselves after you put the subs in. If you're looking for a luxury car quiet ride you should consider working with MLV and CCF which should be full coverage. As far as keeping thin panels from rattling you shouldn't need to go overboard on deadening. Thicker will be better but I think even 80 can be a bit challenging to work with if you buy one with a thicker aluminum layer. I suspect anything thicker if they're making it now would be a lot of extra work to apply.

Sealing doors makes a bigger difference, as what you're trying to do is create a sealed box out of them to separate the rear wave from the front wave.
 

mat3833

CarAudio.com Elite
10+ year member
Mar 12, 2008
1,646
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25 percent coverage in the center of the panel is considered "ideal" by most people for deadener. There are 2 other steps after deadening tho, isolation and blocking. Isolation and blocking are 100 percent coverage deals.

Isolation would be closed-cell foam sheet and blockage would be something like Mass-loaded-vinyl. You can get products that do both in 1.

Matt
 
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thescottishbear

Junior Member
Jul 24, 2013
57
31
I went with a heroic (psychotic) level of deadening so you can check my build to get some ideas. I can tell you that deadener is the very first step of many. There are many materials that you can use in conjunction with each other as well.
I'm old dog so I like to mass load as well. My car was obnoxiously loud before deadening. "Rickety shitbox"; I believe were the words I used. The difference after though could almost be called obscene. Here is a list of the materials I have used thus far.

1.Noico, audiotechnix, and siless deadener. 80-120 even if you put it in the sun you should still use a heat gun.
2. Neoprene. 1/8"-1/2" thick depending on location Self adhesive backed and non.
3. Mass loaded vinyl. 1-2 lb. per sq.ft. depending on location. Expensive and heavy in equal measure
4. Egg crate foam with adhesive back. This doesnt have to be thick. Larger panels. B pillars. On the door cards if you can mange it. Rear deck area.
5. Jut/denim stuffing. Used in upholstery projects. These fill in empty cavities. I take small bunches and stuff them in until full using a thin blade screwdriver. Not tight mind you but somewhat loosely packed. Hexibase and a member here put me on to that.
6. Butyl rope. This is great for decoupling panels, sound and vibration isolation. Gooey so be forewarned.
7. Non hardening modeling clay. I like crayola or the cheaper brands. Plastina leaked wax and made a huge mess.
8. Lead shot and or .177 Copper jacketed bb's. This is mixed with the clay and placed around baffles. I do 2-4lbs. usually.
9. Felt washers. These go under plastic upholstery pins. Like for trim panels and the door cards. Plastic-metal direct contact is no bueno.
10. Roll of window weatherstripping. The white kind you can find at home depot is fine. It works where the butyl won't because it can get super messy.
11. Aluminum tape. I use this to tape down harnesses cables etc. I also used it for the mlv. You want the mlv to be secured but still have mobility.
12. Aluminum flashing. I would cut this for holes on the doors. Screw in place then cover with deadener. Works awesome.

Yeah, it's a big list. For my part, a sizeable amount of my budget is dedictated to this. You could do less or more depending on your objectives, personal preference, budget.
 
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Original wis

CarAudio.com Recruit
Feb 26, 2022
47
18
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
I went with a heroic (psychotic) level of deadening so you can check my build to get some ideas. I can tell you that deadener is the very first step of many. There are many materials that you can use in conjunction with each other as well.
I'm old dog so I like to mass load as well. My car was obnoxiously loud before deadening. "Rickety shitbox"; I believe were the words I used. The difference after though could almost be called obscene. Here is a list of the materials I have used thus far.

1.Noico, audiotechnix, and siless deadener. 80-120 even if you put it in the sun you should still use a heat gun.
2. Neoprene. 1/8"-1/2" thick depending on location Self adhesive backed and non.
3. Mass loaded vinyl. 1-2 lb. per sq.ft. depending on location. Expensive and heavy in equal measure
4. Egg crate foam with adhesive back. This doesnt have to be thick. Larger panels. B pillars. On the door cards if you can mange it. Rear deck area.
5. Jut/denim stuffing. Used in upholstery projects. These fill in empty cavities. I take small bunches and stuff them in until full using a thin blade screwdriver. Not tight mind you but somewhat loosely packed. Hexibase and a member here put me on to that.
6. Butyl rope. This is great for decoupling panels, sound and vibration isolation. Gooey so be forewarned.
7. Non hardening modeling clay. I like crayola or the cheaper brands. Plastina leaked wax and made a huge mess.
8. Lead shot and or .177 Copper jacketed bb's. This is mixed with the clay and placed around baffles. I do 2-4lbs. usually.
9. Felt washers. These go underplastic upholstery pins. Like for trim panels and the door cards. Plastic-metal direct contact is no bueno.
10. Roll of window weatherstripping. The white kind you can find at home depot is fine. It works where the butyl won't because it can get super messy.
11. Aluminum tape. I use this to tape down harnesses cables etc. I also used it for the mlv. You want the mlv to be secured but still have mobility.
12. Aluminum flashing. I would cut this for holes on the doors. Screw in place then cover with deadener. Works awesome.

Yeah, it's a big list. For my part, a sizeable amount of my budget is dedictated to this. You could do less or more depending on your objectives, personal preference, budget.
Thanks that's pretty awesome.

I have CCF that I'm planning to use on the front doors and the rear deck. Not really sure where else to use any of the extra. I was thinking about on the trim panels kind of like what you mentioned above but wasn't really sure how much result I would get.
 

mat3833

CarAudio.com Elite
10+ year member
Mar 12, 2008
1,646
255
I went with a heroic (psychotic) level of deadening so you can check my build to get some ideas. I can tell you that deadener is the very first step of many. There are many materials that you can use in conjunction with each other as well.
I'm old dog so I like to mass load as well. My car was obnoxiously loud before deadening. "Rickety shitbox"; I believe were the words I used. The difference after though could almost be called obscene. Here is a list of the materials I have used thus far.

1.Noico, audiotechnix, and siless deadener. 80-120 even if you put it in the sun you should still use a heat gun.
2. Neoprene. 1/8"-1/2" thick depending on location Self adhesive backed and non.
3. Mass loaded vinyl. 1-2 lb. per sq.ft. depending on location. Expensive and heavy in equal measure
4. Egg crate foam with adhesive back. This doesnt have to be thick. Larger panels. B pillars. On the door cards if you can mange it. Rear deck area.
5. Jut/denim stuffing. Used in upholstery projects. These fill in empty cavities. I take small bunches and stuff them in until full using a thin blade screwdriver. Not tight mind you but somewhat loosely packed. Hexibase and a member here put me on to that.
6. Butyl rope. This is great for decoupling panels, sound and vibration isolation. Gooey so be forewarned.
7. Non hardening modeling clay. I like crayola or the cheaper brands. Plastina leaked wax and made a huge mess.
8. Lead shot and or .177 Copper jacketed bb's. This is mixed with the clay and placed around baffles. I do 2-4lbs. usually.
9. Felt washers. These go under plastic upholstery pins. Like for trim panels and the door cards. Plastic-metal direct contact is no bueno.
10. Roll of window weatherstripping. The white kind you can find at home depot is fine. It works where the butyl won't because it can get super messy.
11. Aluminum tape. I use this to tape down harnesses cables etc. I also used it for the mlv. You want the mlv to be secured but still have mobility.
12. Aluminum flashing. I would cut this for holes on the doors. Screw in place then cover with deadener. Works awesome.

Yeah, it's a big list. For my part, a sizeable amount of my budget is dedictated to this. You could do less or more depending on your objectives, personal preference, budget.
This guy ******* deadens.

You left out the expanding foam(extreme, but SUPER NICE), rope caulk(for sealing door skins to doors or getting rid of those in-dash rattles that felt just can't fix), and the trusty 2 part epoxy.

Matt
 
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