AMP fuse keeps on blowing

hummer100

CarAudio.com Newbie
Apr 13, 2022
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0
Hi,
I have a 2011 Acura TSX and I was replacing the battery then mistakenly connected it wrong (placed positive terminal in negative connection) and it blew up the battery fuse and car wouldn't start. I replaced the battery fuse and car started normally, however the stereo did not have any sound. The stereo turns on normally but no sound comes out of the speakers. I checked the AMP fuse and it was blown, I replaced it a few times and it keeps on blowing every time as soon as I connect it. Any suggestions on how to fix this issue?
 

audiobaun

CarAudio.com Veteran
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Replace the amplifier
 
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ThxOne

AudioFreak
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Ignore Bobby. NEVER replace a fuse with a bigger fuse. It blew for a reason and placing a larger fuse in it could allow a fire to start.
 
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audiobaun

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It sounds like you may have blown the power supply on the amplifier board when you crossed the Battery connections,. So That amplifier will have to be repaired or replaced.. and as cheap as amplifiers are today for a small class D, it would prob. be cheaper to buy a new replacement rather than repair the existing amplifier
 
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Bobbytwonames

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Ignore Bobby. NEVER replace a fuse with a bigger fuse. It blew for a reason and placing a larger fuse in it could allow a fire to start.
You're funny. If it's a 30a fuse he can easily try a 35a fuse. It sounds like the amp is blown. Some guys don't even run fuses. #teamnofuse
 

Bobbytwonames

Trigger Man!
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Aug 28, 2018
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Hi,
I have a 2011 Acura TSX and I was replacing the battery then mistakenly connected it wrong (placed positive terminal in negative connection) and it blew up the battery fuse and car wouldn't start. I replaced the battery fuse and car started normally, however the stereo did not have any sound. The stereo turns on normally but no sound comes out of the speakers. I checked the AMP fuse and it was blown, I replaced it a few times and it keeps on blowing every time as soon as I connect it. Any suggestions on how to fix this issue?
Is this a fuse that is in the amp or an in-line fuse? How big is the fuse and what amp are you running?
 

Deiimos

CarAudio.com Regular
Apr 27, 2021
105
35
If the fuse in the amp blows as soon as you put it in, there’s two possibilities. The mosfet transistor(s) are bad, very common, or the reverse polarity protection diode shorted (if it has one). Both mean amp needs repair. Most proper 12v electronics have a diode installed over the power inputs that clamps down the voltage and creates a high current if you hook the wires up backwards, which then blows the fuses to try and save the device from major damage. This diode often stays shorted and needs to be replaced, or removed, meaning it did its job, but died doing it. Sometimes it saves the device, often it doesn’t. You can cut it out with some wire cutters if it has one and see if it helps, but only if the amp is going to be thrown away. Which depends on brand / model as you can sell blown amps to recoup some money if they are decent.

My older / second car sat for like 5 years and I had to move quickly and needed it moved, aside from the massive oil leak, and fuel leak, I accidentally connected the jumper cables backwards at night. Of course amp fuses blew, but worked once replaced, so yeah the diode can sometimes be the culprit. I use to do CB radio repair and this was a common fault from people wiring them backwards, of course it often fried audio chips and other transistors a lot of the time too, edit: and that was usually when people installed bigger fuses, or were teamnofuse. 😅

The short answer is, if it blows the fuses as soon as it’s installed, the amp needs repair of some sort.
 
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ThxOne

AudioFreak
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You're funny. If it's a 30a fuse he can easily try a 35a fuse. It sounds like the amp is blown. Some guys don't even run fuses. #teamnofuse
Then feel free to experiment on your own gear. I am sure you know more than the manufacturer of the amplifier in question.

OP, I am telling you from training that you never replace a fuse with a higher rated fuse. It can cause a fire and or further damage equipment.
 
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Deiimos

CarAudio.com Regular
Apr 27, 2021
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Not to argue here, but yeah don't put in bigger fuses.

An amplifier can power up with a small fuse, meaning most 1500w amps will power on fine with a 15a fuse, and at most a 20a, and a smaller 100w to 1000w, a 5a to 10a fuse will usually work well for safe testing (of course there are exceptions depending on amp and or power, say a 10kw amp may not power up with a 20a fuse). You can't run them like that as the fuse is too small, but they will power up for basic testing with no problem.

You didn't state what amp it is / original fuse sizes, but if the amps rated fuses blown as soon as you connect it, a bigger fuse will just make it worse.
 

Bobbytwonames

Trigger Man!
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Then feel free to experiment on your own gear. I am sure you know more than the manufacturer of the amplifier in question.

OP, I am telling you from training that you never replace a fuse with a higher rated fuse. It can cause a fire and or further damage equipment.
How do you even know that he had the right size fuse in it to begin with? A fire? Let's not be overly dramatic now. I still want to know how the amp was getting power while he was changing the battery? OP must've connected the battery backwards and then turned his stereo on. If that's the case then the amp is gone.
 

hispls

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How do you even know that he had the right size fuse in it to begin with?
Because OP explained that he fried his amp when he reversed polarity on the power and ground and now it opens the fuse immediately when he powers it up. This implies he has a dead short in there.

"Just put a bigger fuse in there" is probably the dumbest thing you've ever posted on here and that's up against some stiff competition.
 
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ThxOne

AudioFreak
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How do you even know that he had the right size fuse in it to begin with? A fire? Let's not be overly dramatic now. I still want to know how the amp was getting power while he was changing the battery? OP must've connected the battery backwards and then turned his stereo on. If that's the case then the amp is gone.
Overly dramatic... There was no drama given in my factual and prudent information. In fact, I would have removed the power cables from the amplifier as soon as it blew the fuse on the amp as power could still reach it an possible short to ground also causing a fire. We don't know what internal damage there is to the amplifier.
 

Bobbytwonames

Trigger Man!
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Aug 28, 2018
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Because OP explained that he fried his amp when he reversed polarity on the power and ground and now it opens the fuse immediately when he powers it up. This implies he has a dead short in there.

"Just put a bigger fuse in there" is probably the dumbest thing you've ever posted on here and that's up against some stiff competition.
I was assuming that maybe it was an undersized fuse in the amp or too small of an ANL fuse. My bad. I apologize OP.
 

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