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ciaonzo

Anyone try the new Anarchy 5" yet?

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Having a few pairs of the 7" I guess I know what to expect from it, but I was wondering if anyone had a chance to actually play with one yet.

 

https://www.diysoundgroup.com/speaker-parts/speaker-components/woofers/anarchy55-4ohm.html


Saying "clipping doesn't kill speakers" is a half-truth at best. Technically no, clipping itself does not hurt the speaker. But in clipping your amp, you can easily create a situation that WILL kill the speaker. Was the squared waveform the DIRECT cause of the failure? No. In the end, the answer is, always has been, and can only be... heat kills speakers. BUT, clipping increases heat generation, sometimes by a drastic amount. So to start a thread simply to state that clipping does not hurt speakers is, again, a half-truth at best.

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Interesting. The big version is a mid bass monster.


2006 Dodge Ram 2500 Mega Cab 4x4

HU: CD7200MKII

Front Stage: SI TM25/ID X-69

Front Stage Amp: PG Ti21000.4

Sub Stage: Sundown SD-3 12 x2 (soon to be 3 SA-8v3s in a CSCStang TLine)

Sub Stage Amp: PG Ti22000.1

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It would be nice if they provided a PDF for this version so we could get a look at the top end response. Should be better for a 2way than the 7" but we still need to know how to address the break up.


Saying "clipping doesn't kill speakers" is a half-truth at best. Technically no, clipping itself does not hurt the speaker. But in clipping your amp, you can easily create a situation that WILL kill the speaker. Was the squared waveform the DIRECT cause of the failure? No. In the end, the answer is, always has been, and can only be... heat kills speakers. BUT, clipping increases heat generation, sometimes by a drastic amount. So to start a thread simply to state that clipping does not hurt speakers is, again, a half-truth at best.

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I may grab a pair to test at some point. I'm sitting pretty heavy on drivers, though.


Saying "clipping doesn't kill speakers" is a half-truth at best. Technically no, clipping itself does not hurt the speaker. But in clipping your amp, you can easily create a situation that WILL kill the speaker. Was the squared waveform the DIRECT cause of the failure? No. In the end, the answer is, always has been, and can only be... heat kills speakers. BUT, clipping increases heat generation, sometimes by a drastic amount. So to start a thread simply to state that clipping does not hurt speakers is, again, a half-truth at best.

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im in the market for some mids for a 2 way setup, are these only ran as an active setup? I looked around in the link and I didn't see anything with passive crossovers.

 

I just realized it all home audio. Are you using these for home or car audio?


Mechman 270 HO alt

XS Power D3400

Duracell G31

FSD 2600

2 SA-15's

2007 Frontier

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im in the market for some mids for a 2 way setup, are these only ran as an active setup? I looked around in the link and I didn't see anything with passive crossovers.

 

I just realized it all home audio. Are you using these for home or car audio?

No passive kits that I'm aware of, boss. You'll have to use them active. Lots of people use the 7" in the vehicle, here's a link to an old thred with my terrible vids. The first is without a sub, second with the sub.

 

http://www.caraudio.com/forums/speakers/595098-about-exodus-anarchy.html


Saying "clipping doesn't kill speakers" is a half-truth at best. Technically no, clipping itself does not hurt the speaker. But in clipping your amp, you can easily create a situation that WILL kill the speaker. Was the squared waveform the DIRECT cause of the failure? No. In the end, the answer is, always has been, and can only be... heat kills speakers. BUT, clipping increases heat generation, sometimes by a drastic amount. So to start a thread simply to state that clipping does not hurt speakers is, again, a half-truth at best.

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No passive kits that I'm aware of, boss. You'll have to use them active. Lots of people use the 7" in the vehicle, here's a link to an old thred with my terrible vids. The first is without a sub, second with the sub.

 

http://www.caraudio.com/forums/speakers/595098-about-exodus-anarchy.html

 

Nice. I don't want to invest in a DSP so I can't run active with my NEX4100. I read everyone is active, except me lol.


Mechman 270 HO alt

XS Power D3400

Duracell G31

FSD 2600

2 SA-15's

2007 Frontier

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Nice. I don't want to invest in a DSP so I can't run active with my NEX4100. I read everyone is active, except me lol.
It really is the way to go.

 

You can pull off the old school version of active which is basically using amplifiers that have very flexible crossovers that will allow you to cross high between the mid and tweet. Somewhere in the 2k-3k region. Between your head unit and sub amp you should be able to handle high pass for the mid and low pass for the sub.

 

That doesn't give you EQ or time alignment but it does shed those passive crossovers and give you the flexibility to tune to your tastes.


Saying "clipping doesn't kill speakers" is a half-truth at best. Technically no, clipping itself does not hurt the speaker. But in clipping your amp, you can easily create a situation that WILL kill the speaker. Was the squared waveform the DIRECT cause of the failure? No. In the end, the answer is, always has been, and can only be... heat kills speakers. BUT, clipping increases heat generation, sometimes by a drastic amount. So to start a thread simply to state that clipping does not hurt speakers is, again, a half-truth at best.

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It really is the way to go.

 

You can pull off the old school version of active which is basically using amplifiers that have very flexible crossovers that will allow you to cross high between the mid and tweet. Somewhere in the 2k-3k region. Between your head unit and sub amp you should be able to handle high pass for the mid and low pass for the sub.

 

That doesn't give you EQ or time alignment but it does shed those passive crossovers and give you the flexibility to tune to your tastes.

 

 

Yeah I've been doing some searches with 2 way active without DSP. I might give it a try. Im still reading on it, hard to find info here as I can't get the search engine to work.


Mechman 270 HO alt

XS Power D3400

Duracell G31

FSD 2600

2 SA-15's

2007 Frontier

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So beak81champ recently purchased a pair of these for himself but he loaned them to me for subjective testing purposes, which allowed me to satisfy my curiosity about their performance. A big round of applause for his generosity. :applause:

 

Long story short, they are worth every penny of $55/each. Truly a scaled down version of the 7" Anarchy with most of the same attributes, including an XBL^2 motor and the deep mounting depth. But with a much better behaved top end for proper 2way!

 

Long story long; As you would expect, they have lots of clean excursion and a very solid bottom end. Mechanical stroke is limited by the surround to a healthy 3/4" (this is a 5" driver!). You'll want to stay well under that (to about 1/2") in order to keep inter-modulation distortion in check if you plan to use them in a 2way with the usual crossover points. Push beyond that 1/2" excursion and vocals will suffer from the obvious IM distortion. If you're not relying on them for midrange, used as the woofer in a 3way, IM distortion is a bit less of a concern and you can push them almost to the full 3/4" stroke before hearing any physical distress. These have a low Fs (~40Hz) with a medium Q and they can bring some pretty low bass up front for SQ installs if you wish, or you could use them on more power at a higher crossover point for keeping up with more powerful installs. You might also double up on them at that point, running a quad.

 

Like many, the first thing I always do with new drivers is hold one in my hand and feed it a full range source with familiar music. Listening to a driver without an enclosure and without high or lowpass filters will tell you a lot about the inherent character it offers. It can give you some idea of the mechanical power handling abilities on the low end, as well as revealing any potential problem areas on the top end like cone break up. This can help guide you toward the proper filter applications and home in on problem areas that may require a notch filter or similar. If a driver doesn't sound "right" or natural in your hand with a full range signal played through it, how much work will it take to get it to sound natural and is it worth it? Good questions to ask because depending on why it doesn't sound natural, you may never get rid of those sonic signatures that cause it to sound unnatural. Contrary to popular belief, DSP does not fix everything. Better to start with drivers that naturally behave better.

 

The good news is that the 5" Anarchy sounds pretty darn good without too much of anything offensive on the top end with regards to the usual aluminum cone breakup in the 4kHz to 7kHz region. To be sure, there is certainly some evidence of this but it's not nearly as bad as I'd expected. Nothing like you would see on a graph for a Seas aluminum driver and I don't see it being an issue with 18dB/24dB slopes around 2-3kHz. Those who will choose to use 12dB slopes will need to EQ just a little to make things right but you can still drive them pretty hard without the top end breakup becoming evident lower down in the passband. Try that with the 7" Anarchy and you will be rewarded with a harsh and strident presentation that grates on your ears over time. :pissed: It can be done, but it's hard to pull off a smooth-sounding 2way with the 7".

 

After sampling the driver in my hand, it's time to put the drivers through an accelerated but carefully structured break-in sequence before any serious subjective listening is done. This is not as important for power handling concerns, or settling in driver parameters, as it is for opening up the low/mid/high frequencies. The most minuscule details in the music are not as easily released from the new, tight suspension as they are after a proper break in, and the driver just has less congestion with an easier sound to it afterwards. Break-in consisted of a few fast, gentle sweeps from 80Hz to 45Hz to gently exercise the suspension from new, followed by ten minutes of randomized warble tones for a warm up. I then moved on to a half hour with a 45Hz sine wave at about half excursion (noted voltage) and finally, 2 full hours with a 38Hz sine wave at full excursion (noted voltage points for duplication with other the driver). Temps were stable and no smells were noted. Performing break-in this way is not required, as you can do the same thing slowly over time, but I didn't have weeks at my disposal so I opted for the quick approach. But it does provide a deeper, warmer bass with better definition and opens up the mid/high range, and I wanted these to be ready as possible for the stiff competition ahead.

 

I put these Anarchy 5" up against some pretty phenomenal 5" drivers for a proper musical comparison and I was quite pleased, even surprised at times. The SB Acoustics 5" aluminum, SB Acoustics 5" ceramic, and EAD E100HD MKII 5" aluminum were used as a reference. These are all drivers I am very familiar with and they're among the finest sounding devices available, irrespective of price. If you haven't heard any of them, do yourself a favor! If some of them aren't in your budget, I highly recommend grabbing the Anarchy 5" because some aspects of the performance are a close match for this size of driver.

 

Without going through the long list of songs and my impression of how each driver sounds, I would say the biggest difference in performance is the top end extension and refinement is a bit lacking with the Anarchy when compared to these other drivers, but this is hardly an apples to apples comparison across the board. Especially since the EAD is a true full range bending wave driver and is easily the most natural sounding driver I've come across. It also bears mentioning that the Anarchy is truly a woofer first, with a nice midrange performance, rather than a true midrange, so it can easily be forgiven for it's "shortcomings" in this grouping. All the other drivers have copper sleeves in the motor, titanium or fiberglass voice coil formers, and thinner cones that are curved to varying degrees. Where, the Anarchy has shorting rings in the motor, an aluminum former, and a thicker straight profile cone, geared more toward bass duties. It's really no surprise these other drivers sound a bit more refined throughout the midrange and the top end. But I chose to compare the Anarchy to all these drivers because they do sound so good, and I wanted to know what the Anarchy really had to offer when stacked up against them.

 

Overall, it has a stunning low frequency performance that belies its size, easily digging into the 30's for deep bass extension (home use). It can become even more authoritative if you keep it from playing that low in frequency and use the available excursion for dynamics instead (active, vehicle use). It's not the most sensitive driver so be sure to feed it a good amount of power, 75-100w should be sufficient. It's agile and remains composed with complex chords and interweaving of closely clustered instruments, so bass/midbass and low midrange always come through with a very nice separation of detail and a decent sense of space. Drums, toms, snares all have a nice timbre along with a lively attack and decay. Stand up bass, cello have nice body and definition. Violins leave me wanting more, especially with a direct comparison to the other three drivers. They don't sound bad with violins, they just don't offer the same level of midrange transparency. A good sign that you'll want to partner these with a very robust tweeter that will be playing low. Male and female vocals both sound very good with just a bit of 800-1200Hz congestion that EQ will surely be able to clean up. Really depends on your install and application as well. Shoehorn it into a tiny volume and it will sound like it's shoehorned into a tiny volume, nomsayin? All in all, a very solid driver and great value.

 

Truthfully, I feel if the Anarchy fared this well in subjective comparisons within this grouping, it would crush many other car audio offerings costing many times the $55 asking price.


Saying "clipping doesn't kill speakers" is a half-truth at best. Technically no, clipping itself does not hurt the speaker. But in clipping your amp, you can easily create a situation that WILL kill the speaker. Was the squared waveform the DIRECT cause of the failure? No. In the end, the answer is, always has been, and can only be... heat kills speakers. BUT, clipping increases heat generation, sometimes by a drastic amount. So to start a thread simply to state that clipping does not hurt speakers is, again, a half-truth at best.

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Nice. I've been very happy with my 6.5" (7"?) ones I got way back, and other similar Adire clones. I'd have had high hopes for those, glad they performed, will totally keep them in mind if I ever need 5.25" driver.

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Great review man thanks for taking the time to write it up. I had the 6.5s and loved them.


2006 Dodge Ram 2500 Mega Cab 4x4

HU: CD7200MKII

Front Stage: SI TM25/ID X-69

Front Stage Amp: PG Ti21000.4

Sub Stage: Sundown SD-3 12 x2 (soon to be 3 SA-8v3s in a CSCStang TLine)

Sub Stage Amp: PG Ti22000.1

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Having a few pairs of the 7" I guess I know what to expect from it, but I was wondering if anyone had a chance to actually play with one yet.

 

https://www.diysoundgroup.com/speaker-parts/speaker-components/woofers/anarchy55-4ohm.html

 

5”s wtf why not 8s 0r 10s ? Less is never good always need more lol

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


Pioneer Prs80, Rockford DSR1, Taramps 15000 HD, two 18 team FI , 4x PPI900.4s, Massive Audio CT2 tweeters, CDT 6.5 mids and 2 pr Anarchy midbass, 3 group31 juice box batterys , lots of 0 gauge and NRG aluminum hardware, Triple 300 amp CES hairpins, 4 Banks of 6 ultra caps.

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5”s wtf why not 8s 0r 10s ? Less is never good always need more lol

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

 

clear your pms

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clear your pms

 

Just did

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk


Pioneer Prs80, Rockford DSR1, Taramps 15000 HD, two 18 team FI , 4x PPI900.4s, Massive Audio CT2 tweeters, CDT 6.5 mids and 2 pr Anarchy midbass, 3 group31 juice box batterys , lots of 0 gauge and NRG aluminum hardware, Triple 300 amp CES hairpins, 4 Banks of 6 ultra caps.

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Very nice writup and thanks for taking the time to do that. Thanks to beak81champ for donating them for your subjective testing. I do not want to hyjack your thread, but would value your opinion in general about aluminum cone drivers. I think it’s generally related in topic but please say otherwise.

 

So I’m wondering about aluminum cone drivers in general. As soon as I read that these were aluminum cone drivers, I took pause at any thought about buying them. Aluminum cone drivers seem to suffer from some harshness below their cone breakup nodes, even with a 24 db LR crossover. Now my experience is just with the Dayton ND series drivers so they are nothing special, but I cannot help noticing the listening fatigue over long listening periods that I experience with my Dayton’s over my Focal fiberglass cone or SB Acoustics Egyptian pulp paper cone drivers. My Dayton Audio ND140-4 5-1/4” drivers are LP at 2400 hz 24 DB LR and HP at 70 Hz LR for reference. Do you find that some or most aluminum cone drivers suffer from 2nd and 3rd order distortion that effects how they sound in the ranges I’m describing in general? Do you prefer a particular cone material or category over another and why?

 

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.


2014 Sienna 2-way active SQ system. SB Acoustics SB29RDCN Tweeters. Focal PS165V mid woofers. Pioneer D9500F 75 watts RMS x 4. Pioneer BHS 5800 HU. Dayton Audio 408 DSP. 10” Alpine SWS sub in custom ported box tuned to 35 hz, JBL GTX 500.

2014 F-150 XL WT 2-way active SQ system. AudioFrog GB10 tweeters. Stock Ford 6x8 mid woofers. Pioneer D8604. JBL Club 5501. JL Audio Twk 88 DSP & FIX 86. Sundown SD3 10” sub ported/ 33Hz 1 cube.

2014 CX5 2-way active SQ system. Pioneer 1330 NIX HU. AudioFrog GB15 tweeters. AudioFrog GB60. Rockford Ti600.4. Rockford Ti1500. JL Audio Twk 88 DSP. AudioFrog GB12D2” 1.8 cube/33Hz.

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5”s wtf why not 8s 0r 10s ?
No doubt, I would be first in line to purchase an 8"/10" Anarchy! Especially if they scaled it up, accordingly.

 

Very nice writup and thanks for taking the time to do that. Thanks to beak81champ for donating them for your subjective testing. I do not want to hyjack your thread, but would value your opinion in general about aluminum cone drivers. I think it’s generally related in topic but please say otherwise.

 

So I’m wondering about aluminum cone drivers in general. As soon as I read that these were aluminum cone drivers, I took pause at any thought about buying them. Aluminum cone drivers seem to suffer from some harshness below their cone breakup nodes, even with a 24 db LR crossover. Now my experience is just with the Dayton ND series drivers so they are nothing special, but I cannot help noticing the listening fatigue over long listening periods that I experience with my Dayton’s over my Focal fiberglass cone or SB Acoustics Egyptian pulp paper cone drivers. My Dayton Audio ND140-4 5-1/4” drivers are LP at 2400 hz 24 DB LR and HP at 70 Hz LR for reference. Do you find that some or most aluminum cone drivers suffer from 2nd and 3rd order distortion that effects how they sound in the ranges I’m describing in general? Do you prefer a particular cone material or category over another and why?

 

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks, it was my pleasure. I almost forgot to come back to the thread, beak sent me a kind reminder to share my impressions. And I should be the last person concerned with a thread being hijacked with some of my recent remarks in other threads, lol.

 

Yes, I would concur with your assessment of aluminum cones. Always trust your ears. It's a great question you raise and you would be right in hesitating to buy most aluminum drivers for a 2way if you are not prepared to build an appropriate notch filter. No doubt 99% of aluminum drivers suffer from very nasty odd-order distortion (mostly 3rd & 5th) correlating with the high magnitude break-up resonance, and that can easily be appreciated down in the passband even with LR4 filters. The 2nd order stuff is not nearly as offensive, even about the 1%-2% mark, but you don't want too much of it. It would point to another obvious issue with the driver and these things can always be seen in the impedance plot if there is any question. The only way to really be successful would be to build a series resonance trap in parallel with the driver (yes, a passive LCR filter with your active setup). One which targets the frequency, Q, and amplitude of the break-up, but you would also need to build a zobel ahead of that for it to be effective (CR in parallel with the driver to keep impedance flat in the circuit. This means no less than 5 passive components, even for an active setup, and not many folks are prepared to do that. I don't blame them, as it sorta defeats the purpose if that purpose is simplicity or convenience. There's no denying the benefits of an aluminum cone, though. The pistonic behavior in the traditional aluminum cone offers incredible bass solidity and a very detailed midrange. Couple that with a low distortion motor and quality soft parts (actually soft!) and you could end up with quite nice results. It just requires a careful, though-out approach.

 

Enter the new SB Acoustics aluminum drivers and the traditional problems have seemingly disappeared. Where most traditional aluminum cones have a relatively thick and straight profile to avoid any type of flex at all, along with a 90* lip on the underside of the cone for further strength and rigidity, SBA have gone with a much thinner, curvilinear profile and omitted the 90* lip on the underside, while adding the ribs near the perimeter of the cone similar to the ScanSpeak Revalator to address the energy modes within the cone. Of course the size and shape of the dust cap are also vital to how the rest of the cones behaves, so this is worth noting. But all of this works together to force the resonance much, much higher and reduces the magnitude a bit by dissipating the energy in a more effective manner. Indeed, 3rd & 5th order distortion is vanishingly low for this type of driver and materials. This also leads to a much better spectral decay performance because the cone gets quiet much sooner after the signal is removed (or in between waveforms during complex music!), which to your ears just sounds much cleaner and more open or transparent.

 

So a less violent break-up happening at a much higher frequency changes the game quite a bit for the aluminum cone being used in a 2way. Even running the SBA aluminum raw it sounds just amazing. The aluminum edge (the character) is certainly there but it is at a frequency (10kHz!) where we normally might like to boost a dB or two, so it's sorta fun. Make no mistake, though, it is distortion and so it still needs to be filtered out but you do not need the resonance trap or zobel if you are going with the normal active approach. Now couple that cone performance with the absolutely fabulous motors and soft parts found in the SBA drivers and you have something wonderful. Detail, yes. But most any driver can serve up detail. These drivers just release information that has always been there but has been masked out by the noise or distortion associate with traditional aluminum approaches. The ceramics are even better because they utilize the aluminum cones and deposit the ceramic onto that, effectively increasing rigidity but also further damping resonance. The subtle complexities that these aluminum and aluminum/ceramic SBA drivers can dish out is mind blowing at their price point.

 

So where does that leave us with the Anarchy 5", since that's what brought us here? It actually brings me to a correction because I recently noticed the cone has a slight curve to it and thus is not a straight profile as I'd indicated. Sorry for that. But the cone thickness is in between the thick of a Seas cone and the thin of the SBA, or even thinner Jordan, EAD, or MarkAudio cones. It also does not have a 90* lip and so will flex to a degree which explains when the break-up is not nearly as offensive as we're accustomed to. I believe it also has a coating on the cone (which would offer some damping) but I cannot confirm that from any available reading material. I believe I already touched on the strong points of the Anarchy motor and the compliance of the suspension relative to the SBA.

 

To summarize, if you seek an incredibly strong amount of bass with a very well behaved midrange from a single 5" driver, the Anarchy is a great way to go. You will simply get more bass from that driver and you will not need to be overly cautious about dumping power into it from a reasonable abuse perspective. Reasonable being the key word, there. If you seek a class leading distortion profile with an amazingly open and free midrange with unbelievable bandwidth (in both aspects, FR and amplitude dynamics), you should really consider auditioning the SBA drivers. Do not plan on abusing them, though. While they have gobs of mechanical excursion capabilities (nearly a full inch!), the soft parts are incredibly soft and easily driven to full excursion with low power (thus the incredible level of resolution even down to a whisper level), and the coil itself is only 2 layers and not terribly tall. This is the tradeoff for frequency response out to 20kHz with a 5" & 6" driver but that's not to say that they are not tough. You just need to be aware of it and apply power, filters and EQ, accordingly. An enclosure would absolutely be ideal, in most cases. All depends on what you want from your music/system and your level of commitment to the vehicle/install, but again, I feel that is overstating the obvious.

 

As far as other cones, I do like composites. Glass fiber and carbon fiber, mostly. They have a different type of character and when done right they offer a dry sort of crunch that makes for a nice midrange able to convey wood instruments and things llike that very nicely. Bad versions will sound very artificial, though, just like the bad aluminum cones they will need very special attention in the form of the same LCR and zobel circuits.

 

None of the above describes how the cones sound when the driver is on total distress, you know, like when the suspension is being pulled tight and the cone actually sounds like you tapped on it. Not sure if I'm articulating that very well, just wanted to attempt to differentiate between character that is always there because it is inherent to the cone material and character that is the result of what I call "cone cry".

 

Hope I touched on everything for you.

Edited by ciaonzo

Saying "clipping doesn't kill speakers" is a half-truth at best. Technically no, clipping itself does not hurt the speaker. But in clipping your amp, you can easily create a situation that WILL kill the speaker. Was the squared waveform the DIRECT cause of the failure? No. In the end, the answer is, always has been, and can only be... heat kills speakers. BUT, clipping increases heat generation, sometimes by a drastic amount. So to start a thread simply to state that clipping does not hurt speakers is, again, a half-truth at best.

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No doubt, I would be first in line to purchase an 8"/10" Anarchy! Especially if they scaled it up, accordingly.

 

Thanks, it was my pleasure. I almost forgot to come back to the thread, beak sent me a kind reminder to share my impressions. And I should be the last person concerned with a thread being hijacked with some of my recent remarks in other threads, lol.

 

Yes, I would concur with your assessment of aluminum cones. Always trust your ears. It's a great question you raise and you would be right in hesitating to buy most aluminum drivers for a 2way if you are not prepared to build an appropriate notch filter. No doubt 99% of aluminum drivers suffer from very nasty odd-order distortion (mostly 3rd & 5th) correlating with the high magnitude break-up resonance, and that can easily be appreciated down in the passband even with LR4 filters. The 2nd order stuff is not nearly as offensive, even about the 1%-2% mark, but you don't want too much of it. It would point to another obvious issue with the driver and these things can always be seen in the impedance plot if there is any question. The only way to really be successful would be to build a series resonance trap in parallel with the driver (yes, a passive LCR filter with your active setup). One which targets the frequency, Q, and amplitude of the break-up, but you would also need to build a zobel ahead of that for it to be effective (CR in parallel with the driver to keep impedance flat in the circuit. This means no less than 5 passive components, even for an active setup, and not many folks are prepared to do that. I don't blame them, as it sorta defeats the purpose if that purpose is simplicity or convenience. There's no denying the benefits of an aluminum cone, though. The pistonic behavior in the traditional aluminum cone offers incredible bass solidity and a very detailed midrange. Couple that with a low distortion motor and quality soft parts (actually soft!) and you could end up with quite nice results. It just requires a careful, though-out approach.

 

Enter the new SB Acoustics aluminum drivers and the traditional problems have seemingly disappeared. Where most traditional aluminum cones have a relatively thick and straight profile to avoid any type of flex at all, along with a 90* lip on the underside of the cone for further strength and rigidity, SBA have gone with a much thinner, curvilinear profile and omitted the 90* lip on the underside, while adding the ribs near the perimeter of the cone similar to the ScanSpeak Revalator to address the energy modes within the cone. Of course the size and shape of the dust cap are also vital to how the rest of the cones behaves, so this is worth noting. But all of this works together to force the resonance much, much higher and reduces the magnitude a bit by dissipating the energy in a more effective manner. Indeed, 3rd & 5th order distortion is vanishingly low for this type of driver and materials. This also leads to a much better spectral decay performance because the cone gets quiet much sooner after the signal is removed (or in between waveforms during complex music!), which to your ears just sounds much cleaner and more open or transparent.

 

So a less violent break-up happening at a much higher frequency changes the game quite a bit for the aluminum cone being used in a 2way. Even running the SBA aluminum raw it sounds just amazing. The aluminum edge (the character) is certainly there but it is at a frequency (10kHz!) where we normally might like to boost a dB or two, so it's sorta fun. Make no mistake, though, it is distortion and so it still needs to be filtered out but you do not need the resonance trap or zobel if you are going with the normal active approach. Now couple that cone performance with the absolutely fabulous motors and soft parts found in the SBA drivers and you have something wonderful. Detail, yes. But most any driver can serve up detail. These drivers just release information that has always been there but has been masked out by the noise or distortion associate with traditional aluminum approaches. The ceramics are even better because they utilize the aluminum cones and deposit the ceramic onto that, effectively increasing rigidity but also further damping resonance. The subtle complexities that these aluminum and aluminum/ceramic SBA drivers can dish out is mind blowing at their price point.

 

So where does that leave us with the Anarchy 5", since that's what brought us here? It actually brings me to a correction because I recently noticed the cone has a slight curve to it and thus is not a straight profile as I'd indicated. Sorry for that. But the cone thickness is in between the thick of a Seas cone and the thin of the SBA, or even thinner Jordan, EAD, or MarkAudio cones. It also does not have a 90* lip and so will flex to a degree which explains when the break-up is not nearly as offensive as we're accustomed to. I believe it also has a coating on the cone (which would offer some damping) but I cannot confirm that from any available reading material. I believe I already touched on the strong points of the Anarchy motor and the compliance of the suspension relative to the SBA.

 

To summarize, if you seek an incredibly strong amount of bass with a very well behaved midrange from a single 5" driver, the Anarchy is a great way to go. You will simply get more bass from that driver and you will not need to be overly cautious about dumping power into it from a reasonable abuse perspective. Reasonable being the key word, there. If you seek a class leading distortion profile with an amazingly open and free midrange with unbelievable bandwidth (in both aspects, FR and amplitude dynamics), you should really consider auditioning the SBA drivers. Do not plan on abusing them, though. While they have gobs of mechanical excursion capabilities (nearly a full inch!), the soft parts are incredibly soft and easily driven to full excursion with low power (thus the incredible level of resolution even down to a whisper level), and the coil itself is only 2 layers and not terribly tall. This is the tradeoff for frequency response out to 20kHz with a 5" & 6" driver but that's not to say that they are not tough. You just need to be aware of it and apply power, filters and EQ, accordingly. An enclosure would absolutely be ideal, in most cases. All depends on what you want from your music/system and your level of commitment to the vehicle/install, but again, I feel that is overstating the obvious.

 

As far as other cones, I do like composites. Glass fiber and carbon fiber, mostly. They have a different type of character and when done right they offer a dry sort of crunch that makes for a nice midrange able to convey wood instruments and things llike that very nicely. Bad versions will sound very artificial, though, just like the bad aluminum cones they will need very special attention in the form of the same LCR and zobel circuits.

 

None of the above describes how the cones sound when the driver is on total distress, you know, like when the suspension is being pulled tight and the cone actually sounds like you tapped on it. Not sure if I'm articulating that very well, just wanted to attempt to differentiate between character that is always there because it is inherent to the cone material and character that is the result of what I call "cone cry".

 

Hope I touched on everything for you.

 

Ya for sure ! An you imagine 10s in scale with what the 7s are doing ! That would be awesome!

 

 

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Pioneer Prs80, Rockford DSR1, Taramps 15000 HD, two 18 team FI , 4x PPI900.4s, Massive Audio CT2 tweeters, CDT 6.5 mids and 2 pr Anarchy midbass, 3 group31 juice box batterys , lots of 0 gauge and NRG aluminum hardware, Triple 300 amp CES hairpins, 4 Banks of 6 ultra caps.

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Ya for sure ! An you imagine 10s in scale with what the 7s are doing ! That would be awesome!
I suppose if we really wanted to fill the slot for a 10" Anarchy we could just go with the SDX10, the price is pretty good and I'm sure they sound great.

Saying "clipping doesn't kill speakers" is a half-truth at best. Technically no, clipping itself does not hurt the speaker. But in clipping your amp, you can easily create a situation that WILL kill the speaker. Was the squared waveform the DIRECT cause of the failure? No. In the end, the answer is, always has been, and can only be... heat kills speakers. BUT, clipping increases heat generation, sometimes by a drastic amount. So to start a thread simply to state that clipping does not hurt speakers is, again, a half-truth at best.

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I suppose if we really wanted to fill the slot for a 10" Anarchy we could just go with the SDX10, the price is pretty good and I'm sure they sound great.

 

How would those work in my doors ? They have been fully treated & simi sealed up ( as much as doors can get sealed lol )

 

 

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Pioneer Prs80, Rockford DSR1, Taramps 15000 HD, two 18 team FI , 4x PPI900.4s, Massive Audio CT2 tweeters, CDT 6.5 mids and 2 pr Anarchy midbass, 3 group31 juice box batterys , lots of 0 gauge and NRG aluminum hardware, Triple 300 amp CES hairpins, 4 Banks of 6 ultra caps.

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