wiring DVC subs in parallel

WakeNBake520

CarAudio.com Recruit
Mar 5, 2020
34
2
So this is probably a silly question but when wiring a DVC sub in parallel, I know that it’s pos to pos & neg to neg (obviously) but when taking each to the amp can they be T’d between the terminals? Or does it need to be from one terminal of each? (Attaching diagram for clarity’s sake)

If it is supposed to be like the second diagram, how exactly is recommended to get both wires onto the one terminal securely?

I’ve had no issues before doing this but have always used much smaller gauge wire for the sub wires and larger for the power and ground which didn’t crowd the terminals. The manual for the sub I have now says to use large gauge wire which makes it difficult to fit one wire in the terminal let alone two.
 

Attachments

SunUpNeverdown

Support starving audiophiles in America
Jan 12, 2020
303
-34
20759
it’s the same thing. I wire mine in parallel like this so it’s easier and all the wires are the same length away from the box terminals and are closer together.
 
Last edited:

SunUpNeverdown

Support starving audiophiles in America
Jan 12, 2020
303
-34
20754

what I do to make the larger gauge wire fit in my subwoofer terminals, I cut some strands off the actual wires so when twisted together they equal the same a one wire.
20755
 

SlugButter

CarAudio.com Elite VIP
Nov 5, 2019
3,832
1,667
They make reducers, but I’ve done it your way before, and it worked fine for years.
 

WakeNBake520

CarAudio.com Recruit
Mar 5, 2020
34
2
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #5
I’ve got mine literally spliced in the middle of the wire from terminal to terminal, running out to the amp.

I thought it should be just fine given the short length of wire n all.

thank you
 

SunUpNeverdown

Support starving audiophiles in America
Jan 12, 2020
303
-34
I’ve got mine literally spliced in the middle of the wire from terminal to terminal, running out to the amp.

I thought it should be just fine given the short length of wire n all.

thank you
That works. Less current though. Not an optimal way to wire parallel. Worst way but it works.
 
  • Dislike
Reactions: jt4x4

WakeNBake520

CarAudio.com Recruit
Mar 5, 2020
34
2
  • Thread Starter Thread Starter
  • #7
k that’s what I needed to know.

so ima try to figure a way out to fit both into one terminal. The openings are only 3/16 of an inch or so. Can put one in on each side of the (1) terminal but not sure if there would be enough pressure to hold them in place, especially once it starts hitting.

Side note: the way it is now, using less current... what does that mean in a functionality perspective. Less efficient for the amp? Draws more power off the electric to compensate? Or something else?
 

SunUpNeverdown

Support starving audiophiles in America
Jan 12, 2020
303
-34
Wire 1:Negative sub terminal 1 to negative sub terminal 2
Wire 2:positive sub terminal 1 to positive sub terminal 2
Wire 3:positive sub terminal 2 to box terminal
Wire 4:negative sub terminal 2 to box terminal
 

SunUpNeverdown

Support starving audiophiles in America
Jan 12, 2020
303
-34
And take the the wires that are in the #2 sub terminals and cut half the strands off the wires so they are all thinner and together equal the width of one regular wire.
 

1aespinoza

Junior Member
May 22, 2013
1,861
541
So this is probably a silly question but when wiring a DVC sub in parallel, I know that it’s pos to pos & neg to neg (obviously) but when taking each to the amp can they be T’d between the terminals? Or does it need to be from one terminal of each? (Attaching diagram for clarity’s sake)

If it is supposed to be like the second diagram, how exactly is recommended to get both wires onto the one terminal securely?

I’ve had no issues before doing this but have always used much smaller gauge wire for the sub wires and larger for the power and ground which didn’t crowd the terminals. The manual for the sub I have now says to use large gauge wire which makes it difficult to fit one wire in the terminal let alone two.
They are the same, but I would tee them so the full strand can fit in each terminal.
 

jt4x4

CarAudio.com Well Known
Jul 22, 2019
299
93
I realize this thread is old, but I'm responding anyway to correct misinformation.

The definition of parallel circuitry is "connected at both ends". Meaning the voice coils are connected on their positive ends and their negative ends (the speaker terminals). It does not matter how you get to the amp's terminals from there, as long as it's positive-positive and negative-negative. If anything, cutting strands is how you DECREASE current potential, though it is likely negligible in this situation. Theoretically, you actually are better off T'ing off from the middle of the leads because then power hits both voice coils at the same time, though again, given the speed of light, this is negligible; obviously you won't hear it, so I'm merely stating physics.

It is more important that your connections are solid than the way you get from A to B. I personally run a separate wire for each voice coil to the bolts that I use to transfer power through the wood. I used to mess with trying to get multiple wires under my subs' push terminals, but I was never happy with the connection.

- Joe
 

Create an account or login to comment

You must be a member in order to leave a comment

Create account

Create an account on our community. It's easy!

Log in

Already have an account? Log in here.

Similar threads

Latest threads

Latest posts