Setting gain on amp with multimeter


jt4x4

CarAudio.com Enthusiast
Jul 22, 2019
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ND
Ah I see, that's very interesting. I guess what it boils down to though is that the company which made the nameplate isn't using the right tools, no? I mean Fluke is basically saying our tool is more accurate than the tool they used to make the manual so you should use a lesser tool for that. True RMS should give more accurate results for variable frequency drives than without.

I never thought about it that way, with companies actually using non-rms tools and then conflicting with your more accurate one. I guess it makes sense to ditch rms in that regard. I'll say though if you want real values rather than "reference to company values" and you've got RMS vs non-RMS, RMS is always going to be the more 'technically correct' reading.
I completely agree. In my opinion, accurate measurements should be the universal goal! I was not happy to learn that I paid more for a meter that
Ah I see, that's very interesting. I guess what it boils down to though is that the company which made the nameplate isn't using the right tools, no? I mean Fluke is basically saying our tool is more accurate than the tool they used to make the manual so you should use a lesser tool for that. True RMS should give more accurate results for variable frequency drives than without.

I never thought about it that way, with companies actually using non-rms tools and then conflicting with your more accurate one. I guess it makes sense to ditch rms in that regard. I'll say though if you want real values rather than "reference to company values" and you've got RMS vs non-RMS, RMS is always going to be the more 'technically correct' reading.
Lasherz: I agree. In my opinion, accuracy should be a universal goal, but it makes sense to list ratings that are repeatable to the most field workers. You seem intelligent enough that I don't need to expand on that.

To kushy: In regards to your snippy little comment: "If youre that neurotic about a multimeter then you should be using an oscope." I don't know if your comment was meant at me, but, given your track record, I assume it was. Show me an oscilloscope that measures current and/or resistance. I realize you have a lot of posts, so you're probably right about everything. I'd also like to know why you are against friendly conversation that helps enthusiasts decide which test equipment is best for their needs. I can't wait for the thumbs down and lack of helpful response, because your post count is the same as actual experience and knowledge with electricity.
 
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Lasherž

CarAudio.com Veteran
Apr 27, 2020
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Lasherz: I agree. In my opinion, accuracy should be a universal goal, but it makes sense to list ratings that are repeatable to the most field workers. You seem intelligent enough that I don't need to expand on that.
Yeah, makes sense. For whatever reason I was thinking with the price range of the meters they use in heavy industry that they would just always have true RMS as a starting point, but I looked into it a little more and the features they need that up the price tag are all safety related and features like true RMS are considered less useful, eventually being more about "is it on? is it off?" from a safe distance like lineman work. So more vague information using long hot sticks and super high value resistors. If they pass high voltage through a fluke it'll be with special leads to increase the resistance and then do a multiplier factor, but at that point it's not about accuracy between rms and non-rms. That's just my uneducated bias because I'm most familiar with DC electronics and accuracy is everything in that field.
 
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jt4x4

CarAudio.com Enthusiast
Jul 22, 2019
80
20
ND
Yeah, makes sense. For whatever reason I was thinking with the price range of the meters they use in heavy industry that they would just always have true RMS as a starting point, but I looked into it a little more and the features they need that up the price tag are all safety related and features like true RMS are considered less useful, eventually being more about "is it on? is it off?" from a safe distance like lineman work. So more vague information using long hot sticks and super high value resistors. If they pass high voltage through a fluke it'll be with special leads to increase the resistance and then do a multiplier factor, but at that point it's not about accuracy between rms and non-rms. That's just my uneducated bias because I'm most familiar with DC electronics and accuracy is everything in that field.
For "is it on", everyone I know (myself included) uses "beepers" aka voltage detectors. They blink and make noise when the tip is next to a live wire. They can be found with different voltage triggers. Hopefully that adds to the confusion!

- Joe
 
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