Closed Thread
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Reload Thread: Load From Crossover to amp?

  1. #1
    irupp33's Avatar
    irupp33 is offline Senior VIP Member



    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    184
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quoted
    0 Post(s)

    Load From Crossover to amp?

    OKay on my Kicker KX 6.5s what kind of load would the amp be seeing going to the crossover? Say a 2 channel amp and one channel going to the input on each crossover? Like im pretty sure the tweet is 4 ohn and the mid is 4 so does the amp see a 2 or 8 ohm load on each channel?



    2000 Dakota r/t 5.9
    4 10" Alpine type s's (4 more coming)
    2 PA A2400db
    All Kicker KS compenents
    Kicker Wiring
    Stock Electrical
    Yellow top




  2. #2
    CGG318's Avatar
    CGG318 is offline Member



    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Pittsburgh, PA
    Posts
    32
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quoted
    0 Post(s)

    Re: Load From Crossover to amp?

    You could check the resistance w/ a DMM.




  3. #3
    wesl56's Avatar
    wesl56 is offline el sietes!



    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    NoFl
    Posts
    2,386
    Post Thanks / Like
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quoted
    0 Post(s)

    Re: Load From Crossover to amp?

    4... the crossover doesnt **** with the impedance




  4. #4
    adam71's Avatar
    adam71 is offline P9 = Ultimate SQ



    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    5,795
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    10
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quoted
    0 Post(s)

    Re: Load From Crossover to amp?

    Quote Originally Posted by wesl56 View Post
    4... the crossover doesnt **** with the impedance
    Actually I believe the crossover does dictate the impedance. That is why there are 4 ohm crossovers and 8 ohm crossovers. THe drivers in the kicker set may very well be 4 ohm but the crossover (when used) dictates what load the amplifier sees.

    Otherwise if the drivers in that component set were both 4 ohm then the amplifier would be seeing a 2 ohm load. But if the set says it is a 4 ohm set then how is this done if the xover is not doing this.??



    Source Unit: Pioneer P9 combo
    Tweeters: CDT DRT-25 Silk
    Mids: CDT ES-5 (5.25")
    Midbass: CDT M6 (6.5")
    Subs: Pioneer TS-W12PRS
    Mid & Tweet amp: Pioneer PRS-X340
    Midbass Amp: Pioneer PRS-X720
    Sub Amp: Pioneer PRS-X720

  5. #5
    helotaxi's Avatar
    helotaxi is offline Kilroy was Here



    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    South Central (New Mexico that is...)
    Age
    39
    Posts
    8,933
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    4
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quoted
    0 Post(s)

    Re: Load From Crossover to amp?

    Quote Originally Posted by adam71 View Post
    Actually I believe the crossover does dictate the impedance. That is why there are 4 ohm crossovers and 8 ohm crossovers. THe drivers in the kicker set may very well be 4 ohm but the crossover (when used) dictates what load the amplifier sees.

    Otherwise if the drivers in that component set were both 4 ohm then the amplifier would be seeing a 2 ohm load. But if the set says it is a 4 ohm set then how is this done if the xover is not doing this.??
    In a set where both the mid and tweet are 4 ohm, the amp sees a 4 ohm load. The 4 and 8 ohm crossovers determine what impedance the crossover circuit needs to have on it for the crossover to work right. Use any filter calculator and it will ask you the driver impedance. Change the impedance and the component values in the resultant design change as well. Also if you consider a simple second order filter, the cap and the coil change in opposite directions with a change in impedance. If you were to wire a 4 ohm driver to a filter meant for a 8 ohm driver, you end up with a staggered filter, the filter will begin to roll off higher than designed (for a low pass filter) at 6 dB/oct and then will turn into a 12dB/oct filter at a freq lower than designed. The driver imp determines the freq at which the different components in the filter begin to have their effect.

    The way a crossover works is that the low pass portion of the crossover increases the resultant impedance of its branch of the circuit above the crossover freq and the high pass portion increases below the crossover freq. The result is that the overall impedance of the network as a whole is the same as the given drivers for their portion of the frequency spectrum Above the crossover freq, the impedance that the amp "sees" is that of the high freq driver and below that it's the impedance of the low freq driver.



    Artificial Intelligence is no match for Natural Stupidity.

    Never underestimate the power of stupid people in large numbers.

    Life's tough...it's even tougher when you're stupid.

  6. #6
    adam71's Avatar
    adam71 is offline P9 = Ultimate SQ



    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    5,795
    Post Thanks / Like
    Images
    10
    Mentioned
    0 Post(s)
    Tagged
    0 Thread(s)
    Quoted
    0 Post(s)

    Re: Load From Crossover to amp?

    Quote Originally Posted by helotaxi View Post
    In a set where both the mid and tweet are 4 ohm, the amp sees a 4 ohm load. The 4 and 8 ohm crossovers determine what impedance the crossover circuit needs to have on it for the crossover to work right. Use any filter calculator and it will ask you the driver impedance. Change the impedance and the component values in the resultant design change as well. Also if you consider a simple second order filter, the cap and the coil change in opposite directions with a change in impedance. If you were to wire a 4 ohm driver to a filter meant for a 8 ohm driver, you end up with a staggered filter, the filter will begin to roll off higher than designed (for a low pass filter) at 6 dB/oct and then will turn into a 12dB/oct filter at a freq lower than designed. The driver imp determines the freq at which the different components in the filter begin to have their effect.

    The way a crossover works is that the low pass portion of the crossover increases the resultant impedance of its branch of the circuit above the crossover freq and the high pass portion increases below the crossover freq. The result is that the overall impedance of the network as a whole is the same as the given drivers for their portion of the frequency spectrum Above the crossover freq, the impedance that the amp "sees" is that of the high freq driver and below that it's the impedance of the low freq driver.
    Uhhhhhhh...........thanx.



    Source Unit: Pioneer P9 combo
    Tweeters: CDT DRT-25 Silk
    Mids: CDT ES-5 (5.25")
    Midbass: CDT M6 (6.5")
    Subs: Pioneer TS-W12PRS
    Mid & Tweet amp: Pioneer PRS-X340
    Midbass Amp: Pioneer PRS-X720
    Sub Amp: Pioneer PRS-X720

Closed Thread

User Tag List

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may post replies
  • You may post attachments
  • You may edit your posts
1e2 Forum