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1200mk
03-14-2005, 03:25 PM
before a install a hu?

iceteebone
03-14-2005, 03:26 PM
no

SPL140.2
03-14-2005, 03:26 PM
yes always disconnect the battery before installing any aftermarket electronic devices.

squeak9798
03-14-2005, 03:34 PM
yes always disconnect the battery before installing any aftermarket electronic devices.


x2

Always disconnect the battery before working on anything electrical in your vehicle. Not doing so leaves you very suspectable to shorting out wires while you are working on the equipment.

iceteebone
03-14-2005, 03:35 PM
just be careful. i've installed about 10-12 headunits in the past year and never once disconnected the battery and never had any problems.

Twocool4u1
03-14-2005, 03:46 PM
i'd do it just in case. you might screw up your HU or you might shock yourself

Nikuk
03-14-2005, 04:16 PM
News flash: You slip, one time, a 1/2", while holding your deck in one hand, reaching into the dash with the other, clinching a pair of 5" cutters in your teeth.... You will learn to disconnect the negative cable first.

Nick

jrz126
03-14-2005, 04:17 PM
shock yourself on 12V? you might get a tiny tiny tingle but thats it, not much different than touching a 9V battery.

Just pull your radio fuse, and be careful with the wires.

iceteebone
03-14-2005, 04:19 PM
all you gotta do is wire the harness to your new headunit, then unplug the harness from your stock radio, and plug into the new harness and you are done.

Radar
03-14-2005, 04:20 PM
Ive done it both ways, but just to be on the safe side disconnect the battery.

bcarpenterfhl
03-14-2005, 04:23 PM
i wouldnt worry about disconnecting the battery. i've installed many h/us, and never disconnected the battery. A 120 volt shock isnt even that bad (of course it *****, and you should keep yourself from doing it), let alone a 12 volt shock. if you disconnect the battery, then its a b!tch resetting all your clocks n stuff. also, if you plan on doing an install, and keep your stock radio, it will go on lock, and thats a pain in the ***.

Nikuk
03-14-2005, 04:32 PM
all you gotta do is wire the harness to your new headunit, then unplug the harness from your stock radio, and plug into the new harness and you are done.


Ahhh, you guys are using the cute little harnesses & adaptors... thats sweet.

bcarpenterfhl
03-14-2005, 04:37 PM
Ahhh, you guys are using the cute little harnesses & adaptors... thats sweet.

uhh, its a hell of a lot easier, and cheap to.

JimJ
03-14-2005, 04:56 PM
shock yourself on 12V? you might get a tiny tiny tingle but thats it, not much different than touching a 9V battery.

It's not the voltage, it's the amperage...you short yourself out on a "tiny tiny" 12V system, your car battery is going to try to discharge several hundred amps to ground - with you in the way. See if that feels different than touching a 9V battery :)

Nikuk
03-14-2005, 05:01 PM
It's not the voltage, it's the amperage...you short yourself out on a "tiny tiny" 12V system, your car battery is going to try to discharge several hundred amps to ground - with you in the way. See if that feels different than touching a 9V battery :)

I doubt he'll understand that Jack. Good effort though.

3.5Max6spd
03-14-2005, 05:06 PM
you dont HAVE TO, but you SHOULD always disconnect the battery prior to any electrical work

jrz126
03-14-2005, 06:03 PM
It's not the voltage, it's the amperage...you short yourself out on a "tiny tiny" 12V system, your car battery is going to try to discharge several hundred amps to ground - with you in the way. See if that feels different than touching a 9V battery :)

Doesnt ohms law still apply? I=V/R

12 Volts/serveral hundred Kiloohms from hand to hand = a very small current.
As long as you dont put the wires in your mouth...

JimJ
03-14-2005, 06:08 PM
12 Volts/serveral hundred Kiloohms from hand to hand = a very small current.

You make a better conductor than you think :)

It's commonly accepted knowledge that amperages over 1A can kill you if you don't get out of the circuit soon enough. The voltage is simply how big of a shock you get...but the current is what kills you.

Nikuk
03-14-2005, 06:16 PM
You make a better conductor than you think :)

It's commonly accepted knowledge that amperages over 1A can kill you if you don't get out of the circuit soon enough. The voltage is simply how big of a shock you get...but the current is what kills you.

As little as 600 milli-amps IIRC. It's been awhile since I took that training.

-Nick