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View Full Version : Toyota Matrix - mp3 hard drive + head unit = ??



ravepunk
01-04-2005, 05:49 PM
A friend got me an OmniFi car unit for Christmas:

http://www.omnifimedia.com/about/about.asp
http://www.g4techtv.com/freshgear/features/41705/First_Look_Omnifi.html

... essentially, it's an MP3 hard drive that is on your home wireless network when you're parked at home.

I have a 03 Matrix with the stock stereo that's just short of the "premium" unit.

It has no AUX inputs, so I will need to buy a new head unit but I don't have the cash to match speakers.

I've been looking at the Alpine head units, but can't figure out whether or not I'd be able to hook the omnifi as an aux unit. Would it be an external CD changer? What the heck would I plug the omni-fi into without an Aux jack?

I'm hoping that both head units will fit in the Matrix, and I think I found a "double DIN" setup for it that would make it work.

Here are my listening habits:

- AM Talk to and from work
- Custom music to and from just about any other place
- I compose electronic music in my spare time using Roland Digital Reference monitor speakers, so I understand that my car stereo isn't going to match THAT but, I can't stand muddy music. :)

I demand a reasonable user interface in anything I own. I hate motorized doors and "little movies" that play on most of the head units out there. If I wanted to watch TV, I'd be at home. If I wanted to play with a motorized door, I'd go to jail.

Anyone have any thoughts or suggestions? Anyone else have an omnifi?

THANKS IN ADVANCE!
Terry

ravepunk
01-07-2005, 12:45 AM
Ok - so after all of the great responses (sfsf) and after reading opinions on this forum, I think I'm going to just say no to Alpine. Why? Lack of reasonable user interface. My experience in the store playing with the units from Alpine indicate that there is a less-than stellar ability to do things that are meaningful using the head unit without stopping the car. (Example: Try tweaking the bass up a tad.)

SOOOOO - my question then remains: What head unit makes sense for me?

Hmmm...
T

ShakinSupra
01-07-2005, 12:48 AM
I love my Nakamichi, 2 sets of RCA inputs, great simple user interface, great sound

ravepunk
01-07-2005, 01:56 AM
Wow - I'd never heard of Nakamichi (not surprising - they are not sold in my country) ... but very very nice specs on the 7011 and beautiful/easy to use styling. Where can I order and how much do they cost in US currency?

Terry

ShakinSupra
01-07-2005, 02:14 AM
The CD-700 is awesome but very expensive... if you don't mind buying on eBay you can get a CD-400, which replaced the CD-45z which I have, for ~$280 shipped. I'm sure they have a Nak dealer somewhere in America that sells their car audio... I'd email them.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=3293&item=5742719824&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW

Slody4Futbol
01-07-2005, 02:19 AM
there is a place where i live that sells nak... so i'm sure there are some elsewhere in the states

JoseMCeee
01-07-2005, 02:22 AM
Ok - so after all of the great responses (sfsf) and after reading opinions on this forum, I think I'm going to just say no to Alpine. Why? Lack of reasonable user interface. My experience in the store playing with the units from Alpine indicate that there is a less-than stellar ability to do things that are meaningful using the head unit without stopping the car. (Example: Try tweaking the bass up a tad.)

SOOOOO - my question then remains: What head unit makes sense for me?

Hmmm...
T
Just cuz u dont know how to use the HU doesnt mean its a bad deck. Go get a girly user friendly pioneer deck then n00b :laugh:

d cha p
01-07-2005, 04:01 AM
^lol

ravepunk
01-07-2005, 04:14 AM
Just cuz u dont know how to use the HU doesnt mean its a bad deck. Go get a girly user friendly pioneer deck then n00b :laugh:

Hundreds of functions and tens of buttons do not mean good design. Good designers develop scenarios (called "use-case scenarios") that define the types of things that typical users of a product would like to do.

"Architypes" are categories of users that would purchase a product.

These are the user-interface features of my architype:

I expect any feature to be no more than 2-steps from the root mode - whatever that may be. If I am playing a CD, I expect all functions that related to that mode (be it one function or one hundred) to be no more than two steps from the mode at the time of playback.

Features that are less common to me -- such as: setting display color to match my interior dash lights, setting a custom EQ -- can be farther from the root mode. I wouldn't expect to be able to program a radio station while listening to a CD. It's not a use-case scenario that my architype desires.

Here's a question for you: Would you expect that "Custom 1", "Custom 2" and "Custom 3" are appropriately illustrative of three of your custom EQ settings? I would not. I would expect to be able to name my settings. Why should I be saddled with remembering whether or not Custom 1,2, or 3 was the EQ I like to use when listening to vinyl transfers of punk?

I am the type of user who will read the manual cover to cover prior to purchasing the unit. I expect every function to be intuitive because my main concern while I am in the vehicle is actually driving and not watching my head unit's worthless screen saver.

It's apparent to me that you are the type of consumer who is more impressed with the detailed animation on your head-unit's screen and less impressed by how incredibly crisp and clear 256 gray-shades allow properly hinted text to render. After all, my goal is to read the display quickly and efficently. Your goal is to press a series of buttons and be presented with the information as a reward for remembering what to do.

As you mature, you will learn that form and function are intertwined and good design is difficult if not impossible to achieve under cost constraints demanded by a market such as this one. There are entire treatises on the subject of humans interacting with machines that you would do well to read. I'm sorry to say they are not written in 133+ speak (and therefore, would likely not appeal to your nature).

While it has not been updated for almost a year, this page would provide you with an excellent jumping off point for understanding how flawed your view of humans and technology is. After all, your view will only lead you to frustration in the world of the future: http://www.pliant.org/personal/Tom_Erickson/InteractionPatterns.html.

Good luck.
T

JoseMCeee
01-08-2005, 01:49 AM
^Overkill

Fazimoto
07-23-2005, 06:50 PM
That was awesome. And I agree with RP.

PowerdByGuiness
07-23-2005, 07:10 PM
Agreeing with Jose.


Hundreds of functions and tens of buttons do not mean good design. Good designers develop scenarios (called "use-case scenarios") that define the types of things that typical users of a product would like to do.

"Architypes" are categories of users that would purchase a product.

These are the user-interface features of my architype:

I expect any feature to be no more than 2-steps from the root mode - whatever that may be. If I am playing a CD, I expect all functions that related to that mode (be it one function or one hundred) to be no more than two steps from the mode at the time of playback.

Features that are less common to me -- such as: setting display color to match my interior dash lights, setting a custom EQ -- can be farther from the root mode. I wouldn't expect to be able to program a radio station while listening to a CD. It's not a use-case scenario that my architype desires.

Here's a question for you: Would you expect that "Custom 1", "Custom 2" and "Custom 3" are appropriately illustrative of three of your custom EQ settings? I would not. I would expect to be able to name my settings. Why should I be saddled with remembering whether or not Custom 1,2, or 3 was the EQ I like to use when listening to vinyl transfers of punk?

I am the type of user who will read the manual cover to cover prior to purchasing the unit. I expect every function to be intuitive because my main concern while I am in the vehicle is actually driving and not watching my head unit's worthless screen saver.

It's apparent to me that you are the type of consumer who is more impressed with the detailed animation on your head-unit's screen and less impressed by how incredibly crisp and clear 256 gray-shades allow properly hinted text to render. After all, my goal is to read the display quickly and efficently. Your goal is to press a series of buttons and be presented with the information as a reward for remembering what to do.

As you mature, you will learn that form and function are intertwined and good design is difficult if not impossible to achieve under cost constraints demanded by a market such as this one. There are entire treatises on the subject of humans interacting with machines that you would do well to read. I'm sorry to say they are not written in 133+ speak (and therefore, would likely not appeal to your nature).

While it has not been updated for almost a year, this page would provide you with an excellent jumping off point for understanding how flawed your view of humans and technology is. After all, your view will only lead you to frustration in the world of the future: http://www.pliant.org/personal/Tom_Erickson/InteractionPatterns.html.

Good luck.
T


so you are characterizing all of alpine's products as user unfriendly because you cant work the higher line products?

try their entry level line (9843, 45, 47). they are as high quality as the higher lines but with less features.

click the knob once to adjust treble, twice for bass, three times for subwoofer out. seems simple enough for a big rocket scientist like you

stones
07-23-2005, 07:30 PM
Aw phuck guys what the hell are you arguing this for?
he just wants a simple interface, it a matter of personnal choice, nobodys going to come to your houses and kill you for owning an Alpine just because this guy wants somthing with a different design.
You guys can be a real pain in the *** somtimes.

stones
07-23-2005, 07:38 PM
Go check into the new Kenwood Excelon lineup, they have all their audio controlling options available directly from the volume knob.
Prices are very competitive as well.