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chrisgray
10-28-2004, 05:30 PM
How will two subs sound sharing airspace in a sealed enclosure. Just curious it would make glassing the box sooooo much easier. It's gonna be two L7 eights. Also how would you figure the volume? Would you just combine space, doubling the space for one, or would there be more to it than that? I've always used separate chambers. They will be in phase/mono channel. Any help would be appreciated. Thanx Much :crap:

BASS OUTLAW
10-28-2004, 06:55 PM
well well, it sounds the same, and yes, u only double the recomended vol.
but lets say 1 sub got diffectted or whatever, its not workin, other sub wont be playin nicely, it will actually be some how like playin it free air (its double the VOL.)
i dont recommend that. but hey wait for other comments :)

vosschs
10-28-2004, 06:58 PM
i dont reccommend it either at all!! i had 2 type R's sharing airspace had it up loud one blew, like bass outlaw said then its like runnin in free air, then the other blew :S

JimJ
10-29-2004, 12:34 AM
it's no problem, just if one goes then it tends to take the other with it if you're at full volume...

under normal circumstances there's no difference.

Tater_Salad
10-29-2004, 09:31 AM
im woundering about two 12"s in a ported box... if its better in a single chamber w/ 1 port or 2 chambers w/ 2 ports

squeak9798
10-29-2004, 09:43 AM
it will actually be some how like playin it free air (its double the VOL.)


That's not necessarily true. It will definitely see the whole volume itself, which will lower it's mechanical power handling, but that doesn't mean it's free-air.



im woundering about two 12"s in a ported box... if its better in a single chamber w/ 1 port or 2 chambers w/ 2 ports


For simplicity sake, a single chamber is definitely the way to go IMO.


However, for a sealed box, another advantage of using a dual chamber box is that the dividing wall doubles as a nice brace :) But as Jmac said, it's fine to use the same airspace

BASS OUTLAW
10-29-2004, 10:22 AM
That's not necessarily true. It will definitely see the whole volume itself, which will lower it's mechanical power handling, but that doesn't mean it's free-air.
True, thats why i used "some how" :rolleyes:

squeak9798
10-29-2004, 10:30 AM
True, thats why i used "some how" :rolleyes:


Sorry, but "some how" makes no sense in that sentence.

BASS OUTLAW
10-29-2004, 10:34 AM
my bad, english is not my first language,
thank god that i understand what u are sayin.

and hey, is it good to play a sub in double the rec. vol ??
did u actually try that??

squeak9798
10-29-2004, 11:54 AM
my bad, english is not my first language,
thank god that i understand what u are sayin.

Well then, you are doing quite well :) English is not an easy language to learn.


and hey, is it good to play a sub in double the rec. vol ??
did u actually try that??

That's a really vague and hard to answer question. It all depends on the sub, your goal for the "sound" of the system, etc etc. Plus, the manufacturer's "recommended enclosure" isn't always the "best" enclosure, because generally manufacturer's recommended enclosures on the smaller side because it gives a nice peak in the lower midbass/upper bass region, which is what the typical street beaters likes his bass to sound like.

squeak9798
10-29-2004, 04:21 PM
I'd venture to say most companies recommend enclosures that are on the small side

You are correct. I tried typing too fast and put the wrong word :)