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View Full Version : RMS vs. Peak



crash813
09-14-2004, 09:58 AM
I have some RF FNX 5.25" components in the front rated at 70/140 watts.

My amp is a 4 x 125. When setting the gains on the amp, should I set them to make the RMS or the Peak wattage of the speaker?

thanks

squeak9798
09-14-2004, 10:03 AM
RMS


Peak power is meaningless and should be ignored.

UndercoverPunk
09-14-2004, 10:04 AM
RMS
10 chars

maylar
09-14-2004, 11:12 AM
Neither. The power you can give them will depend on the install and the hipass/eq settings you use. You can't just set power levels with a voltmeter with mids.

3.5Max6spd
09-14-2004, 01:58 PM
I had a set of 5.25" X's- they will fry with +100rms......

crash813
09-14-2004, 02:53 PM
Neither. The power you can give them will depend on the install and the hipass/eq settings you use. You can't just set power levels with a voltmeter with mids.


Why not? Is the concept not the same? Based on resistance and voltage, you can figure out how many watts are going into the speaker. I'm not concerned about distortion, but just burning up the speaker putting too much power to them. Is that not what setting up the gain is for?

Brock
09-14-2004, 02:56 PM
Why not? Is the concept not the same? Based on resistance and voltage, you can figure out how many watts are going into the speaker. I'm not concerned about distortion, but just burning up the speaker putting too much power to them. Is that not what setting up the gain is for?

true, but you also have to take into consideration the envoronment. thats like taking a sub out of a sealed box, throwing it into a huge vented enclosure and expecting the same amout of power to do the same thing...somewhat.

pay attention to the RMS rating and go from there...

squeak9798
09-14-2004, 04:41 PM
Why not? Is the concept not the same? Based on resistance and voltage, you can figure out how many watts are going into the speaker. I'm not concerned about distortion, but just burning up the speaker putting too much power to them. Is that not what setting up the gain is for?

You not only have to worry about thermal but mechanical power handling as well. The reason I said RMS in my original post is because (assuming your speakers can handle it thermally) it is a good starting point. If it sounds like the speakers can't handle it mechanically, then I assumed most people would have the common sense to either not turn it up as loud or to back down the gain some more.

g30ffr3y
09-14-2004, 05:31 PM
how do you figure out how many watts are going to the
subs based on volts and ohms???

would that be volts squared divided by ohms???

ANeonRider
09-14-2004, 05:43 PM
would that be volts squared divided by ohms???

yup, good old ohms law

P=IV
V=IR

crash813
09-14-2004, 08:39 PM
You not only have to worry about thermal but mechanical power handling as well. The reason I said RMS in my original post is because (assuming your speakers can handle it thermally) it is a good starting point. If it sounds like the speakers can't handle it mechanically, then I assumed most people would have the common sense to either not turn it up as loud or to back down the gain some more.


Thanks Squeak.........that's kinda what I was aiming at doing. Getting it close power wise then watching for distortion. I just didn't know if it was safe to start a little higher than RMS since that state that. Ya'll answered my question though.

thanks

(Like a computer.........learning bit by bit!)