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coolman91985
05-31-2004, 01:39 PM
is it ok to run some infinity kappa 693.5i and 60.5cs speakers at 2ohms for daily driving? are these speakers under rated or over rated at all?

thanks

Moe Lester
05-31-2004, 02:02 PM
You cant change the impendence of the speaker... Well you could recone it and have a 2 ohm coil put in. If you were to wire a pair of speakers in parallel the amp would run at 2 ohms, and if your amp is stable at 2 ohms it would work.

kappa546
06-04-2004, 01:51 AM
hey man u live in houston? wanna meet up so i can hear ur DP? never heard any IA product before but i really want to. kappa546@yahoo.com since i dont really check this forum that often

coolman91985
06-04-2004, 12:59 PM
so i cant just wire my speakers to run at 2 ohms? i have to get them reconed?

jleecong
06-04-2004, 01:12 PM
If you were to wire a pair of speakers in parallel the amp would run at 2 ohms, and if your amp is stable at 2 ohms it would work.

10 characters

Acidburn
06-04-2004, 02:15 PM
if you ran your speakers in parallel to get a 2 ohm load, it would work but you would have a mono signal, no stereo and you wouldn't be able to fade right to left

Cosmic Charlie
06-05-2004, 09:00 AM
^^^^^ whys that if he's running 4 speaks 2 on each channel parrellel he should still maintain fade and balance. I think, don't flame me if Im wrong. CC

jleecong
06-05-2004, 10:17 AM
^^^^^ whys that if he's running 4 speaks 2 on each channel parrellel he should still maintain fade and balance. I think, don't flame me if Im wrong. CC

Normally this would be true and you could wire the speakers in series or parallel. However since component have a inline crossover that only accept 2 channels and then outputs 4 channels I don't see how this could be done.

Acidburn
06-05-2004, 06:26 PM
ok, say you put the 2 front speakers on Ch.1 and the 2 rear speakers on Ch.2, since both front speakers are receiving the same signal, it would be mono, actually you would have one side coming from in front of you and the other from behind you which would jsut be totally weird

if you put the 2 right speakers on Ch.1 and the 2 left speakers on Ch. 2, then you will have a stereo signal and be able to fade right to left but you couldn't fade front to back

helotaxi
06-05-2004, 06:32 PM
Normally this would be true and you could wire the speakers in series or parallel. However since component have a inline crossover that only accept 2 channels and then outputs 4 channels I don't see how this could be done.
Treat the crossover as the speaker when wiring as far as parallel or series.

Matador
06-05-2004, 06:53 PM
he could either use the balance or the fader but not both if he wants them at 2 ohms.
what amp you got? you can always upgrade it if u got some money

coolman91985
06-07-2004, 12:33 AM
i got it figured out, thanks for all of the reply's

boister77
06-07-2004, 09:01 AM
correct me if i'm wrong, but i think if you change the load to 2ohms, the crossover will not function the same since it's designed to work with a 4ohm speaker. so if you want a 2ohm speaker, not only would you have to recone or get another set, but also redesign the crossover. not quite sure of this though. anways, if you need more power at 4ohms, just get a more powerful amp.

coolman91985
06-07-2004, 01:12 PM
ok, thanks for the suggestion

helotaxi
06-07-2004, 07:49 PM
correct me if i'm wrong, but i think if you change the load to 2ohms, the crossover will not function the same since it's designed to work with a 4ohm speaker. so if you want a 2ohm speaker, not only would you have to recone or get another set, but also redesign the crossover. not quite sure of this though. anways, if you need more power at 4ohms, just get a more powerful amp.
While it is true that the crossover is designed to work with a speaker of a certain impedance, that doesn't prevent you from wiring two or more sets of components together to reach a lower impedance. Treat the + and - input terminals of the crossover the same as you would the + and - terminals of an individual speaker.

boister77
06-07-2004, 09:16 PM
While it is true that the crossover is designed to work with a speaker of a certain impedance, that doesn't prevent you from wiring two or more sets of components together to reach a lower impedance. Treat the + and - input terminals of the crossover the same as you would the + and - terminals of an individual speaker.
thanks for bringing this up. i forgot to mention if you wire two sets of componts pre crossover, it's possible. however if you wire two sets of speaker post crossover, it won't work.

helotaxi
06-08-2004, 12:15 AM
Well, it will work but the crossover frequency will be different than intended.

c_hayhurst
06-14-2004, 10:21 PM
Just so I better understand 2- and 4-Ohm speakers (as relates to subs) better:

Where the difference between the Ohms come from is the design of the speakers themselves, not to any wiring that is done on the amp. If you have an amp that is 2-Ohm stable, you can run 2-Ohm speakers off that amp. Yes, no, maybe?

On the topic of 2-Ohm speakers:

Would using a 2-Ohm sub powered by a 2-Ohm stable amp experience any more wear or strain as opposed to using the same amp to power a 4-Ohm sub? Both examples would be using a speaker capable of meeting RMS maximum for either impedence.

helotaxi
06-15-2004, 01:15 AM
The amp will run a bit cooler when running a 4 ohm final load as opposed to a 2 ohm load, but it usually won't make as much power. If you were t orun two 4 ohm speakers in parallel so that the amp sees a 2 ohm load then it would be the same as runing a single 2 ohm speaker. The amp doesn't differentiate between speakers of different impedances. The only thing that matters is the final impedance. You can run any impedance of speaker off any amp provided that the speakers are wired such that the final load of the speaker array is one that the amp can handle.