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Braindead
09-10-2013, 09:08 AM
I've been watching a few tutorials before i build my box, is it worth it to double up on the surface the subs will be mounted to?

Also I saw this one port idea, instead of having the port go off a right angle when it needs to go to the side (for more port length) have the extra length by putting another piece of mdf parallel to the first piece, and maintain port width? Anybody do this, is it worth it? I guess the idea is to not obstruct one of the subs with the port

NASTY08IMPALA
09-10-2013, 09:15 AM
I've been watching a few tutorials before i build my box, is it worth it to double up on the surface the subs will be mounted to?

Also I saw this one port idea, instead of having the port go off a right angle when it needs to go to the side (for more port length) have the extra length by putting another piece of mdf parallel to the first piece, and maintain port width? Anybody do this, is it worth it? I guess the idea is to not obstruct one of the subs with the port
depends on how.beefy the subs are ..and as far a a second wall in the port sometimes its neccesary sometimes not ..depends on what tuning u are trying to acheive

Braindead
09-10-2013, 09:20 AM
depends on how.beefy the subs are ..and as far a a second wall in the port sometimes its neccesary sometimes not ..depends on what tuning u are trying to acheive

For my port i need it to be 26" long so i need a second wall, and my subs together are about 30lbs

Braindead
09-10-2013, 09:22 AM
depends on how.beefy the subs are ..and as far a a second wall in the port sometimes its neccesary sometimes not ..depends on what tuning u are trying to acheive

For my port i need it to be 26" long so i need a second wall, and my subs together are about 30lbs

NASTY08IMPALA
09-10-2013, 09:28 AM
For my port i need it to be 26" long so i need a second wall, and my subs together are about 30lbs

Yea just make sure u maintain port width on the second piece ..and u dont need double.front baffle with that weight not even close ..i didnt start using.dbl bafle til i was running subs 35lbs each and up now my 12s are 64lbs a piece so i use dbl baffle with bolts and tnuts ..i dont trust any screw

Braindead
09-10-2013, 12:40 PM
Yea just make sure u maintain port width on the second piece ..and u dont need double.front baffle with that weight not even close ..i didnt start using.dbl bafle til i was running subs 35lbs each and up now my 12s are 64lbs a piece so i use dbl baffle with bolts and tnuts ..i dont trust any screw
Will it hold up if I build it with 2" drywall screws and titebond

bbeljefe
09-10-2013, 01:03 PM
Will it hold up if I build it with 2" drywall screws and titebond

Yes it will. If your cuts are good and you use enough glue, the screws are just there to hold things together until the glue dries.

But if you're gonna have to buy screws anyway, I'd use trim screws rather than drywall screws. They have smaller heads so they're easier to fill and sand smooth.

Braindead
09-10-2013, 01:20 PM
Yes it will. If your cuts are good and you use enough glue, the screws are just there to hold things together until the glue dries.

But if you're gonna have to buy screws anyway, I'd use trim screws rather than drywall screws. They have smaller heads so they're easier to fill and sand smooth.
I only have 2 large clamps, should I just build it a section at a time? Im going to wood stain the box

bbeljefe
09-10-2013, 01:25 PM
I only have 2 large clamps, should I just build it a section at a time? Im going to wood stain the box

Titebond II or III sets pretty quickly so I wouldn't worry with leaving clamps in place after the screws are in. And since you're staining the box, I presume you'll be using Birch or some other hard plywood? Stain and MDF do not work well together...

Braindead
09-10-2013, 01:34 PM
Titebond II or III sets pretty quickly so I wouldn't worry with leaving clamps in place after the screws are in. And since you're staining the box, I presume you'll be using Birch or some other hard plywood? Stain and MDF do not work well together...

No, 3/4 mdf. I just though it'd look a little bit nicer with wood stain than spray paint. Could I just skip the screws or would that be a bad idea

bbeljefe
09-10-2013, 05:26 PM
Don't skip the screws. They're needed to hold things tightly until the glue completely cures.

And I would recommend not staining MDF, as it is not wood, it is wood fiber, wax and resin. When you stain it what you end up with looks like someone spilled a giant cup of coffee and didn't clean it up...

NASTY08IMPALA
09-10-2013, 05:29 PM
No, 3/4 mdf. I just though it'd look a little bit nicer with wood stain than spray paint. Could I just skip the screws or would that be a bad idea

Yea dont waste ur time staining mdf ...just wont work...like putting lipstick on a pig..spend a few extra bucks and get birch or some cabinet grade ply

NASTY08IMPALA
09-10-2013, 05:31 PM
And spray paint doesnt work well either and looks like *** bc mdf ***** and is so pourus..either carpet it or leave it raw..if u absolutly are going to use mdf

Braindead
09-10-2013, 10:00 PM
Titebond II or III sets pretty quickly so I wouldn't worry with leaving clamps in place after the screws are in. And since you're staining the box, I presume you'll be using Birch or some other hard plywood? Stain and MDF do not work well together...

I made my cuts, and they don't line up too well. I dont have a belt sander, but would i use a dremel to even things up? lol

NASTY08IMPALA
09-10-2013, 10:13 PM
^^^ that would take forrreverrr lol

bbeljefe
09-10-2013, 10:17 PM
I made my cuts, and they don't line up too well. I dont have a belt sander, but would i use a dremel to even things up? lol

I wouldn't use a dremel tool as you can't get a good straight edge with it. And no belt sander either, for the same reason. To clean up ends, the best thing to use is a long block and some elbow grease.... And then once you have the box assembled, caulk the interior with Polyseamseal or painter's caulk. Some people use silicone but it doesn't stick well to wood, it's messy as hell and it smells like shite.

Braindead
09-10-2013, 10:20 PM
I wouldn't use a dremel tool as you can't get a good straight edge with it. And no belt sander either, for the same reason. To clean up ends, the best thing to use is a long block and some elbow grease.... And then once you have the box assembled, caulk the interior with Polyseamseal or painter's caulk. Some people use silicone but it doesn't stick well to wood, it's messy as hell and it smells like shite.

Like a long block of sandpaper? And in some places it curves a good .25" away, maybe i should cut a few fresh pieces with the leftover mdf...

bbeljefe
09-10-2013, 10:58 PM
Like a long block of sandpaper? And in some places it curves a good .25" away, maybe i should cut a few fresh pieces with the leftover mdf...

Yeah.... a piece of scrap about 2" by 10" wrapped with anything from 40 to 120 grit, depending on how much cutting you need to do is the best way to trim uneven cuts. The idea behind having a long block it so that it doesn't cut into one area and make a dip.

And if you've got cuts that are " off, you should recut those panels. You need the cuts to be as tight as possible for both strength and sealing of the box.

Take a good straight board and a couple of clamps and make yourself a rip fence and you'll get good smooth cuts. I'm pretty sure there is a video tutorial on that in the enclosure section of this site but if not, search on youtube for "skill saw rip fence".