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View Full Version : How Do You Calculate Volume For Fiberglass Enclosures?



sungwei
05-04-2004, 01:05 AM
When you fiberglass it's usually done in a shape that is rounded off and awkward. This makes it difficult to calculate how much volume the enclosure actually has. How do you guys go about measuring this? I wanna place an enclosure in the corner of my trunk, but I want to make sure it's enough volume.

Also how do you go about porting in a fiberglass enclosure?

Acidburn
05-04-2004, 01:07 AM
you could use water and see how many gallons it holds and then convert that to cubic feet, but i dont know how good of an idea that is

if you have a flat side of the enclosure then you can port it like any other, with either wood or PVC

Gauntlet
05-04-2004, 01:09 AM
Use water to calculate the volume. Do a search on google for a conversion rate.

sungwei
05-04-2004, 01:24 AM
Problem is wouldn't you have to construct the box first to test with water? If you built to big or small it'd be too late right? How can you go about doing this before construction?

sungwei
05-04-2004, 01:24 AM
How accurate does volume have to be? Can you adjust/compensate with the size of the port?

90towncar
05-04-2004, 08:35 AM
packing peanuts :D

boister77
05-04-2004, 04:32 PM
Problem is wouldn't you have to construct the box first to test with water? If you built to big or small it'd be too late right? How can you go about doing this before construction?

no it wouldn't be too late. you can always fill the box with items to take up the extra volume. so, it's best to make fiberglass box a bit bigger. it's always easier to fill up the extra space than not having enough.

Acidburn
05-04-2004, 11:26 PM
ya, you can just throw some wood in there or something if you have too much volume, and if you have too little, you may be able to add some more fiberglass or you're just screwed

sungwei
05-06-2004, 11:46 PM
no it wouldn't be too late. you can always fill the box with items to take up the extra volume. so, it's best to make fiberglass box a bit bigger. it's always easier to fill up the extra space than not having enough.

Oh yeah, man I feel kinda dumb for not figuring that out by myself. Yeah I was wondering what to fill the extra space up with though . I guess you could built a small wall of fiberglass in a section inside the box take up the necessary space.

TimidSh0ck
05-09-2004, 01:29 AM
or, make it small, and you can always add pillow fill in.

RiceNotNice
05-09-2004, 09:36 PM
rather than water-those small styrafoam BBs used in bean bag chairs work really well

Acidburn
05-09-2004, 10:54 PM
that could work but they static cling to EVERYTHING, **** little things...

C/U Kid
05-10-2004, 04:08 PM
if you have a flat side of the enclosure then you can port it like any other, with either wood or PVC

meaning, you could just fiberglass around a little opening hole, and just put one of those plastic ports with a tube attached on the inside in the hole? I thought you have to more than that for an effective port, a lot of the ported boxes i've seen have wood screwed into the sides of the box making a little 'path' if you will for the air to travel through before getting to the port.... stupid question maybe? :banghead:

sungwei
05-10-2004, 05:58 PM
I want to port it. I figured I'd just make the enclosure and then use a circular drill or dremel to cut out the hole for the port. Wouldn't that work? Maybe seal the edges of the port with some adhesive or seal? Perhaps there is a better way?

InhumanAcura
05-10-2004, 06:46 PM
Build a cube without a top 13.5x13.5x12.75 (1^ft) fill the enclosure w/ water and empty into the cube until you get the volume. I marked mine every inch to be somewhat exact. It may be some trouble to build the box, but you always have the measurment tool in the future.
If the enclosure is to big in the end, use expanding spray foam to make up the differential.

sungwei
05-10-2004, 09:29 PM
Actualy couldn't you just use a beaker or any liquid measuring device/container? You don't really need to build the cube right? Just as long as you can measure the volume of liquid going in and out of the enclosure. You would just have to convert fluid ounces to cubic feet.

Please correct me if I'm wrong here.

BIG_SUPERMAN72
05-10-2004, 09:37 PM
No u can use the measurements to find volume. Forgot how though. ill check the geometry book.

InhumanAcura
05-10-2004, 10:20 PM
Actualy couldn't you just use a beaker or any liquid measuring device/container? You don't really need to build the cube right? Just as long as you can measure the volume of liquid going in and out of the enclosure. You would just have to convert fluid ounces to cubic feet.

Please correct me if I'm wrong here.

Your 100% correct....Its just an easy way to do it, its surely not the only way to do it. It probally took 15 minutes to build and label it while I waited for the mold to dry.
I would assume using liter bottles would be a easy conversion to cubic feet.

Benny212
05-10-2004, 10:33 PM
If I remember correctly its 28.3 liters per cubic foot

InhumanAcura
05-10-2004, 11:20 PM
If I remember correctly its 28.3 liters per cubic foot

Look, you might even be correct, BUT do you think you could fit 28 liter bottles in a cubic foot????