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accuab
11-10-2011, 07:18 PM
I know I need to caulk the box to help seal it. But what about along the port walls? The reason I was wondering is it seems like it would be kinda hard to get down inside the port and do a good job caulking it. My port is gonna be 3" wide and I just don't see a caulk gun getting down in there very well, much less my hand to smooth out the bead.

Kangaroux
11-10-2011, 07:20 PM
Try and caulk as much of it as you can during assembly. When it's done, put on a latex glove or something and put the caulking on the tip of your index finger. From there you can usually spread it pretty good inside the joints of the port.

CAT MAN
11-10-2011, 07:21 PM
try using bathroom caulk. i use it to seal my subs and boxes. has a latex feel until it dries(4 hrs)

accuab
11-10-2011, 07:25 PM
I know getting the side of the port wall closest to the speaker will be no problem so it should be sealed with that side. how important is getting a good seal on the other side gonna matter?

Kangaroux
11-10-2011, 07:27 PM
If you can get a good seal on one side you shouldn't have a problem.

accuab
11-10-2011, 07:32 PM
If you can get a good seal on one side you shouldn't have a problem.

So is it really even necessary to try to caulk the inside of the port? All the box's outer walls will be caulked and the port wall's side towards the speaker would be done. The first leg is only 10.75 in length so that one won't be a problem to do both sides of it but the second in around 15 in so I don't think I could get all of the inside.

Kangaroux
11-10-2011, 07:35 PM
So is it really even necessary to try to caulk the inside of the port? All the box's outer walls will be caulked and the port wall's side towards the speaker would be done. The first leg is only 10.75 in length so that one won't be a problem to do both sides of it but the second in around 15 in so I don't think I could get all of the inside.

If you get a good amount of caulking on the inside of the port and you use glue to help seal it off as well you won't have any problems.

accuab
11-10-2011, 07:39 PM
yea I know the wood glue will do most of the sealing on its own. The caulk is more of a secondary sealing method. I may still see if I can caulk the inside but your answers have helped me feel better in case I can't get all of the inside caulked.

i2ain2thunder
11-10-2011, 07:43 PM
A. You do not need a gun put a bunch on your finger and apply it with your finger will take longer may use a lil more but will work just fine.
B. I always recommend a closed cell foam vs caulk. Caulk has the same properties as a rubber and will bounce, reflect soundwaves a bit, it doesn't affect sound much but you're always looking for more of a dampener (trap) for bass the less bouncing/flexing the better.

accuab
11-10-2011, 07:56 PM
B. I always recommend a closed cell foam vs caulk.

Not trying to sound stupid here but what is closed cell foam.

i2ain2thunder
11-10-2011, 11:07 PM
wikipedia: :) Solid foamsSolid foams form an important class of lightweight cellular engineering materials. These foams can be classified into two types based on their pore structure: open-cell-structured foams (also known as reticulated foams) and closed-cell foams.

Open-cell-structured foams contain pores that are connected to each other and form an interconnected network that is relatively soft. Open-cell foams will fill with whatever they are surrounded with. If filled with air, a relatively good insulator is the result, but, if the open cells fill with water, insulation properties would be reduced. Foam rubber is a type of open-cell foam.

Closed-cell foams do not have interconnected pores. The closed-cell foams normally have higher compressive strength due to their structures. However, closed-cell foams are also in general denser, require more material, and as a consequence are more expensive to produce. The closed cells can be filled with a specialized gas to provide improved insulation. The closed-cell structure foams have higher dimensional stability, low moisture absorption coefficients, and higher strength compared to open-cell-structured foams. All types of foam are widely used as core material in sandwich-structured composite materials.

From the early 20th century, various types of specially manufactured solid foams came into use. The low density of these foams made them excellent as thermal insulators and flotation devices, and their lightness and compressibility made them ideal as packing materials and stuffings. A modern application of foam technology is aerogel, which is a closed-cell foam with very good insulatory properties, that is also very light. It is usually based on alumina, chromia, and tin oxide, with carbon aerogels first developed in the late 1980s.

[edit] Syntactic foamMain article: Syntactic foam
A special class of closed-cell foams is known as syntactic foam, which contains hollow particles embedded in a matrix material. The spheres can be made from several materials, including glass, ceramic, and polymers. The advantage of syntactic foams is that they have a very high strength-to-weight ratio, making them ideal materials for many applications, including deep-sea and space applications.[6] One particular syntactic foam employs shape memory polymer as its matrix, enabling the foam to take on the characteristics of shape memory resins and composite materials; i.e., it has the ability to be reshaped repeatedly when heated above a certain temperature and cooled. Shape memory foams have many possible applications, such as dynamic structural support, flexible foam core, and expandable foam fill.[7]

VisceralSound
11-11-2011, 03:14 AM
What about applying some on the opening of the woofer hole, like a little then placing your subwoofer into the hole with sealing between it and the wood?

accuab
11-11-2011, 09:50 AM
What about applying some on the opening of the woofer hole, like a little then placing your subwoofer into the hole with sealing between it and the wood?

Assuming you're talking about putting caulk on the subwoofer, just don't do it. You will read that the fumes released from the caulk curing can damage rubber parts of the subwoofer. That's why you should always wait for it to fully cure before installing the sub.

however, now that I have seen the closed cell foam recommendation, it would probably be very useful when sealing between the box and sub.

StevesCarAudio
11-11-2011, 07:30 PM
Yeah I usually just wood glue the box and screw it with some good long screws and never really have a problem. I have never caulked a box. If you really want to go all out fiberglass the inside of the box, it works wonders! Fiberglass resin, strips and hardner isn't very expensive at home depot/Lowes.

kramer_212
11-11-2011, 07:31 PM
Try and caulk as much of it as you can during assembly. When it's done, put on a latex glove or something and put the caulking on the tip of your index finger. From there you can usually spread it pretty good inside the joints of the port.

putting the glove on is my favorite part

its10v1
11-12-2011, 06:07 PM
putting the glove on is my favorite part

this^