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maylar
09-17-2011, 10:59 AM
The 3 band equalizer on my JVC head unit has frequency and Q settings for each band. Like for bass, you can choose 60/80/100/120 Hz and Q of 1.0/1.25/1.5/2.0 The manual says nothing about what the settings do. I'm guessing that the frequency setting is the center frequency of the adjustment, but what does the Q setting mean?

Thanks

bubbagumper6
09-17-2011, 11:07 AM
Google'd "JVC Q Settings" and this was the second result...it pays to search brah

http://www.caraudio.com/forums/head-units/508007-jvc-eq-pro-setting-help.html

VWBobby
09-17-2011, 01:51 PM
^^^ don't be a ****, just answer his question!

This is the best explanation I found:
" The EQ Pro setting gives you a list of frequencies to choose. The Q is the bandwidth factor that is centered on the frequency you choose. Increasing the Q makes the EQ adjustment affect a broader range of frequencies. Make small adjustments and give yourself some time to listen to familiar music before you make more adjustments. "

In English: It is the width of the sound for each band. More Q = Fatter sound on that band.

bubbagumper6
09-17-2011, 02:03 PM
^^^ don't be a ****, just answer his question!

This is the best explanation I found:
" The EQ Pro setting gives you a list of frequencies to choose. The Q is the bandwidth factor that is centered on the frequency you choose. Increasing the Q makes the EQ adjustment affect a broader range of frequencies. Make small adjustments and give yourself some time to listen to familiar music before you make more adjustments. "

In English: It is the width of the sound for each band. More Q = Fatter sound on that band.

I did answer his question and thought my reply was quite respectful...don't get your ******* in a bunch :fyi:

Falcons
09-17-2011, 02:37 PM
i wear thongs from time to time

zerosktr111
09-17-2011, 02:53 PM
Q is the opposite.... The higher the Q the more peaky it is.

BnGRacing
09-17-2011, 06:24 PM
http://www.fibre2fashion.com/_resources/industry-articles/1/72/images/72_2_1.gif

Pretend that's your frequency response and the bell curve is the frequency you're about to boost. The top graph would resemble what a low Q does to the frequency response and a high Q resembles the lower graph.

In essence, Q determines how many neighboring frequencies are affected and how they're affected when a certain frequency is boosted or cut.