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View Full Version : Anything bad with 2V preouts?



elancohen92
03-17-2011, 04:32 PM
I am looking for a deck and im just wondering about pre out voltage, obviously 4v would be better but would 2v still be good? even for something temporary?

Bassin Buick
03-17-2011, 04:36 PM
i'm running 2.2 volts without any problem.

retrojordans
03-17-2011, 04:39 PM
Just adjust your amp's gains accordingly, the lower the head unit's voltage output the more the amp has to compensate with it's gain, running dirtier.

Get a line driver for $50 and it'll be fine. I run a Kenwood DDX-6019 Double Din with 3 x 2v pre-outs..Awesome unit, I just run a nice AudioControl line driver.

Sending a nice hot signal to the amp allows the $100 line driver (Audiocontrol makes a little tank of a line driver) to take the abuse while saving your $1500 SAZ-4500D basically...

CRXBMPN
03-17-2011, 04:45 PM
i've got 2v pre-outs and i have zero issues.

elancohen92
03-17-2011, 04:47 PM
hmm, well heres the deck im thinking about getting for TEMPORARY! (just making sure you guys no, i would never, ever, run this forever) WX-GT77UI | XplMd™ Double DIN CD Receiver | Sony | Sony Style USA (http://www.sonystyle.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10151&catalogId=10551&langId=-1&productId=8198552921665801112)

CHEMMINS
03-17-2011, 04:51 PM
Just adjust your amp's gains accordingly, the lower the head unit's voltage output the more the amp has to compensate with it's gain, running dirtier.

Get a line driver for $50 and it'll be fine. I run a Kenwood DDX-6019 Double Din with 3 x 2v pre-outs..Awesome unit, I just run a nice AudioControl line driver.

Sending a nice hot signal to the amp allows the $100 line driver (Audiocontrol makes a little tank of a line driver) to take the abuse while saving your $1500 SAZ-4500D basically...

Who taught you about audio? You are wrong, wrong...and guess what.....wrong again. Please go learn what a gain on an amp does before touting wrong information to new people.

retrojordans
03-17-2011, 04:53 PM
LOL Completely correct.

A higher input voltage allows you to lower the amp's gain. The higher than amp's gain has to be set (compensating for a low voltage input singnal) the higher the noise floor (DIRTY).

What's wrong about it?

whitedragon551
03-17-2011, 04:53 PM
Who taught you about audio? You are wrong, wrong...and guess what.....wrong again. Please go learn what a gain on an amp does before touting wrong information to new people.

This.

Preout voltage doesnt matter. Tune your amp properly and no issues.

elancohen92
03-17-2011, 04:54 PM
Who taught you about audio? You are wrong, wrong...and guess what.....wrong again. Please go learn what a gain on an amp does before touting wrong information to new people.

yeah i definitely knew he wasnt right, just didnt mind the noobz on here. I just dont know too much about H/U's and needed some advice. thanks for all of it guys

whitedragon551
03-17-2011, 04:54 PM
LOL Completely correct.

A higher input voltage allows you to lower the amp's gain.

All the gain is is a potentiometer that allows you to match voltages.

The one thing that is an advantage is the higher the HU preouts voltage the less you turn the amps, which in turn lets the amp run cooler prolonging the life of the amp. However if its a quality piece of equipment it wont matter.

Imtjnotu
03-17-2011, 04:54 PM
No nothing really wrong with it...still I do like my eclipse 8v pre outs

elancohen92
03-17-2011, 04:55 PM
if pre out voltage doesnt matter then why is 4v better than 2v? just a stronger signal?

elancohen92
03-17-2011, 04:55 PM
No nothing really wrong with it...still I do like my eclipse 8v pre outs

isnt that a misprint? i thought they had 6v...

whitedragon551
03-17-2011, 04:56 PM
isnt that a misprint? i thought they had 6v...

Some have 8v, some have 16v balance outputs, some have 5v and a few are less.

elancohen92
03-17-2011, 04:58 PM
well i think im just going to buy this WX-GT77UI | XplMd™ Double DIN CD Receiver | Sony | Sony Style USA (http://www.sonystyle.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10151&catalogId=10551&langId=-1&productId=8198552921665801112) and my amp will be my dtr.1 2200

Imtjnotu
03-17-2011, 05:02 PM
isnt that a misprint? i thought they had 6v...no sir...my cd7100 has 8 volts....it just the power of the signal the amp gets....just set ur gains to how u like the sound with out over doing I and killing u speakers or sub

Imtjnotu
03-17-2011, 05:03 PM
Not bad for a starting deck

Pataforce8
03-17-2011, 05:03 PM
Running an amp at 300 watts with a 4v signal will require just as much out of the amp as running the amp at 300 watts with a 2v signal. The amp works just as hard either way. However, a 4v signal will have a lower noise floor than a 2v signal. Running a line driver is only useful if you have your gain on your amp all the way up and you're still not getting your maximum RMS wattage. Running a line driver will not help your amp, nor will it clean up your signal (the line driver also boosts the noise in the 2v signal), it will only allow you to use all of your amps output IF you cannot do so already.

2 volts is usually fine. If it's not, than get a line driver. Chances are that either way, you're not going to hear the noise while music is playing. Especially not while the car is moving.

elancohen92
03-17-2011, 05:04 PM
im not a noob! i just dont know about hu's!

retrojordans
03-17-2011, 05:05 PM
"This is essentially how a system should be set up:

The head unit should be able to use most of its range before the amplifier is driven into clipping. Again, if the gains are set too low, the head unit won't be able to drive the amplifier to its maximum output level. If the gains are set too high, the amp will be driven into clipping at a very low volume level (on the head unit)."

Courtesy of: http://www.bcae1.com/

whitedragon551
03-17-2011, 05:10 PM
Running an amp at 300 watts with a 4v signal will require just as much out of the amp as running the amp at 300 watts with a 2v signal. The amp works just as hard either way. However, a 4v signal will have a lower noise floor than a 2v signal. Running a line driver is only useful if you have your gain on your amp all the way up and you're still not getting your maximum RMS wattage. Running a line driver will not help your amp, nor will it clean up your signal (the line driver also boosts the noise in the 2v signal), it will only allow you to use all of your amps output IF you cannot do so already.

2 volts is usually fine. If it's not, than get a line driver. Chances are that either way, you're not going to hear the noise while music is playing. Especially not while the car is moving.

Wrong. A line driver is ONLY useful if you dont send a clipped signal in the first place. If your settings gains properly and your still not getting the required voltage there is an issue somewhere else in the system. If you use a line driver on a clipped signal all your doing is amplifying it and sending it down the line.


This is essentially how a system should be set up:

The head unit should be able to use most of its range before the amplifier is driven into clipping. Again, if the gains are set too low, the head unit won't be able to drive the amplifier to its maximum output level. If the gains are set too high, the amp will be driven into clipping at a very low volume level (on the head unit).

Not true either. The amp wont be driven into clipping if you set your gains properly and its a quality piece of gear. Some headunits are limited internally to never produce a clipped signal through the RCA outputs. My 9887 is an example. At full tilt with the sub level at 15/15 the 9887 will NEVER send a clipped signal through the RCA's according to an O Scope.

CHEMMINS
03-17-2011, 05:10 PM
This is essentially how a system should be set up:

The head unit should be able to use most of its range before the amplifier is driven into clipping. Again, if the gains are set too low, the head unit won't be able to drive the amplifier to its maximum output level. If the gains are set too high, the amp will be driven into clipping at a very low volume level (on the head unit).

Dude...it may sound right in you head, but it is coming out wrong. Please stop typing.

retrojordans
03-17-2011, 05:11 PM
Dude...it may sound right in you head, but it is coming out wrong. Please stop typing.

Basic Car Audio Electronics (http://www.bcae1.com/)

Directly quoted from this site, please get the **** off my nuts feg...k?

You act like I'm just making stuff up and you are so ******* sweet and knowledgeable. Whatever veteran electrical engineer writing for BCAE is just wrong...He's just a flat out moron I know dude...

Pataforce8
03-17-2011, 05:15 PM
Wrong. A line driver is ONLY useful if you dont send a clipped signal in the first place. If your settings gains properly and your still not getting the required voltage there is an issue somewhere else in the system. If you use a line driver on a clipped signal all your doing is amplifying it and sending it down the line.


Yeah, that's what I meant lol maybe it came out wrong.

A clipped signal is bad, and it can come from your HU. Line drivers will help keep the HU from clipping, but they will also boost the amount of noise in your signal. They essentially boost your signal and noise AND clipping if it is happening.

TBH, I'm not really sure why so many people feel that they need line drivers...

CHEMMINS
03-17-2011, 05:16 PM
Basic Car Audio Electronics (http://www.bcae1.com/)

Directly quoted from this site, please get the **** off my nuts feg...k?

You act like I'm just making stuff up and you are so ******* sweet and knowledgeable. Whatever veteran electrical engineer writing for BCAE is just wrong...He's just a flat out moron I know dude...


Ok, now read the whole facking page ya dumb shat, learn something.....And come up with some logical thinking of your own, instead of copyright infringement.

Wingman0121
03-17-2011, 05:17 PM
I only see the point of higher voltages when you need to use a splitter to run multiple amps from one set of output, but it doesn't hurt to have 4v or more for preamp... I wouldn't go through the trouble of installing a line driver tho.

I had an Eclipse line driver that went bad and it started sending straight DC to my amp's inputs, actually I think that's how my Cadence amp's input went bad.



FYI some home theater receivers' preamp subwoofer output can go over 10v unclipped, why I donno.

retrojordans
03-17-2011, 05:17 PM
Ok, now read the whole facking page ya dumb shat, learn something.....And come up with some logical thinking of your own, instead of copyright infringement.

Lol dude you are a moron. Off my nuts shoo, be gone.

CHEMMINS
03-17-2011, 05:18 PM
AAnd if super high pre amp voltage was a good thing......why doesn't every deck coming out have 12v pre outs?

Hmm......maybe they are not needed....there is a thought.

whitedragon551
03-17-2011, 05:18 PM
LOL Completely correct.

A higher input voltage allows you to lower the amp's gain. The higher than amp's gain has to be set (compensating for a low voltage input singnal) the higher the noise floor (DIRTY).

What's wrong about it?


Basic Car Audio Electronics (http://www.bcae1.com/)

Directly quoted from this site, please get the **** off my nuts feg...k?

You act like I'm just making stuff up and you are so ******* sweet and knowledgeable. Whatever veteran electrical engineer writing for BCAE is just wrong...He's just a flat out moron I know dude...

NOTE:A piece of equipment that has a higher maximum output voltage is not necessarily going to sound better than one which is only capable of 2 volts output. The higher output will allow you to reduce the gains on your amp (or any down line signal processor) which will lower the noise floor of your system. If you are not having trouble with noise (alternator, hiss...), you may not benefit from the extra output voltage.

retrojordans
03-17-2011, 05:20 PM
NOTE:A piece of equipment that has a higher maximum output voltage is not necessarily going to sound better than one which is only capable of 2 volts output. The higher output will allow you to reduce the gains on your amp (or any down line signal processor) which will lower the noise floor of your system. If you are not having trouble with noise (alternator, hiss...), you may not benefit from the extra output voltage.

All gain adjustment does is; let the head unit's volume, affect the amp's output level more sensitively. So you don't reach your amp's full power on the head unit's 3rd volume notch. BASICALLY. Couldn't explain gain any more simply.

If your head unit's output voltage is just not enough to fully power the amp without a clipped signal ( from the head unit ) get a line driver. Or ,if like you said, your system has a high inherent noise level.

CHEMMINS
03-17-2011, 05:23 PM
Thats wrong too.....ffs. Listen.... H/U pre out voltage does fack all to the amps sensitivity.

retrojordans
03-17-2011, 05:24 PM
Good enough for you oh wise ones...rofl.

retrojordans
03-17-2011, 05:24 PM
Thats wrong too.....ffs. Listen.... H/U pre out voltage does fack all to the amps sensitivity.

huh? Dude please take your time, I know reading is difficult.

CHEMMINS
03-17-2011, 05:29 PM
you are hopeless.....and I am not quoting everything you say, because you go back and change it.....

retrojordans
03-17-2011, 05:30 PM
you are hopeless.....and I am not quoting everything you say, because you go back and change it.....

Moron.

retrojordans
03-17-2011, 05:36 PM
Just adjust your amp's gains accordingly, the lower the head unit's voltage output the more the amp has to compensate with it's gain, running dirtier.

Get a line driver for $50 and it'll be fine. I run a Kenwood DDX-6019 Double Din with 3 x 2v pre-outs..Awesome unit, I just run a nice AudioControl line driver.

Sending a nice hot signal to the amp allows the $100 line driver (Audiocontrol makes a little tank of a line driver) to take the abuse while saving your $1500 SAZ-4500D basically...

By the way this is the first thing I posted, in practical lament's terms it couldn't be better info. If your head unit puts out 13 volts you can turn the amp's gains down and still reach it's max power at a reasonable head unit volume. If the head unit has to be turned all the way up to reach it's 2v pre-amp output Voltage and still only reach 75% of the amp's RMS power @ 50% gain, you have to turn the gain up more to be able to reach the same amp output power on a lower head unit volume.

Dude you haven't contributed **** because you are a clueless nuthugger you go fugging read BCAE I was reading that **** and tweaking amps in 2001...Newb bish...OFF MY NUTS................... SHOO

retrojordans
03-17-2011, 05:38 PM
Useless hater, you don't dare type anything because you get slamboozled for lack knowledge when you do, I know how to tweak an amp I don't care if you can't fathom my explanations, they are fundamentally correct. Clueless little nuthugger wow..Contribute nothing but haterism and TROLLISM...Get a **** job Mr. Genius rofl...Didn't contribute 1 **** thing...Useless hater..

Pataforce8
03-17-2011, 05:45 PM
Here's a great explanation:

Pre-Out Voltages - More preout voltage makes my amp work less and get louder! - DIYMA.com (http://www.diymobileaudio.com/forum/car-audio-truth-myths-industry-dogma/96372-pre-out-voltages-more-preout-voltage-makes-my-amp-work-less-get-louder.html)

huricaine
03-17-2011, 06:18 PM
Retrojordans was correct. No big deal...One of the most simple concept in ca....

emilimo701
07-14-2011, 03:57 PM
Who taught you about audio? You are wrong, wrong...and guess what.....wrong again. Please go learn what a gain on an amp does before touting wrong information to new people.

What is he wrong about? Just wondering. He seems to be giving fine advice.

emilimo701
07-14-2011, 04:04 PM
This.

Preout voltage doesnt matter. Tune your amp properly and no issues.

It does matter. For example, what he was talking about with the amp's noise floor.

Imtjnotu
07-14-2011, 04:06 PM
It does matter. For example, what he was talking about with the amp's noise floor.

U seriously had to restart this old fire.....didn't u......

emilimo701
07-14-2011, 04:09 PM
The higher output will allow you to reduce the gains on your amp (or any down line signal processor) which will lower the noise floor of your system.

Yes I believe this is the point he was making.

emilimo701
07-14-2011, 04:10 PM
U seriously had to restart this old fire.....didn't u......

lol blame Google. he (she?) is the one that brought me to it

IonRL205
07-14-2011, 04:26 PM
lol blame Google. he (she?) is the one that brought me to it

You should have looked at the dates of the thread before you posted....don't blame google

emilimo701
07-18-2011, 01:05 AM
You should have looked at the dates of the thread before you posted....don't blame google

:crap: i have a reading disability