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View Full Version : everyone says "if it's a good install, anything will wang hard" but my question is...



wickedmax
02-08-2004, 01:40 AM
what factors go into the install that will make it sound soo much better / louder. I want to make my own box, and i want it to be quality. I was leaning towards sealed(im a noobie and it would make it much easier to build a sealed box than ported). i'd probably be putting some infinity references in there temoparily while i saved up for 2 SE12's. I would build the box to the specs of the SE's (2.3 cu. ft. sealed, after displacement)

what do you guys think about that?? hmmm, or could i (instead of paying $150 for 2 references) buy 1 RE SE12 install it in box since the chambers are seperate anyways. and save up from there. guys don't really know what to do.

but im a highschooler on a budget (im sure most of you remember what that's like, or are still experiencing it) and i wanted to save $300 on the install by doing a box myself or even go to gnomeaudio.com (ill save the nice installs till college)

i guess the question is: what main factors go into making a GREAT DIY install. keeping in mind im a noobie (meaning i prolly don't have enough skillz for fiberglass)

p,.s. love this forum, learned tons so far...

TPABlazer
02-08-2004, 03:03 AM
nice installs at college.. lol it took me ~5 months to build my box/amp rack.. and 2 months before that to pick a sub

lombardo
02-11-2004, 04:53 PM
Just go all out. Porting them isn't that hard. Just cut a few extra wood peices. I'm sure someone in here would be very willing to share you the port dimensions. You will have that wangin smile on your face if you port those suckers.

maylar
02-11-2004, 07:39 PM
Geez - a highschool kid who speaks in complete sentences and real paragraphs. A welcome change.

I would build a sealed box to the specs for the References, and make a new one if you upgrade subs later. Boxes are the easy part.

As for sealed vs ported, there are ongoing debates on that. The general consensus is that sealed gives you smoother response but ported is louder.

nweibley
02-11-2004, 07:42 PM
Geez - a highschool kid who speaks in complete sentences and real paragraphs. A welcome change.

I would build a sealed box to the specs for the References, and make a new one if you upgrade subs later. Boxes are the easy part.

As for sealed vs ported, there are ongoing debates on that. The general consensus is that sealed gives you smoother response but ported is louder.
I resent that statement! ;)

All the advice so far is good, but the two most important things to designing an excellent stereo are, in my opinion, careful planning and lots of reasearch. Combine both of those and you'll get exactly what you need to done.

That said, I agree, I think you should make a sealed box too... and the Infinity Perfects are a pretty solid sub, especially from an SQ standpoint.

tommyk90
02-11-2004, 07:44 PM
That said, I agree, I think you should make a sealed box too... and the Infinity Perfects are a pretty solid sub, especially from an SQ standpoint.

He's got the references though...... :uhoh:

Chance89
02-11-2004, 10:03 PM
Your not alone buddy...I'm a little gr 10er and i got a half *** decent sterio in my truck. If I can do it so can you. I say just go sealed man...way easier for ur first install

helotaxi
02-11-2004, 10:06 PM
i guess the question is: what main factors go into making a GREAT DIY install. keeping in mind im a noobie (meaning i prolly don't have enough skillz for fiberglass)
The key to any install, pro or DIY, is sweat the details. Do it right the first time and it will save you money and time in the long run by not forcing you to do it again. The little things during the initial install can save you time and money later. Over size your power wire. Makes room for the upgrades later. Upgrade your charging lead, engine block ground and battery ground. Overbuild the crap out of your box. If you have any question about whether it is stiff enough, it isn't stiff enough. Securely mount everything. Your box should not be able to move around in the trunk. Your amps should not move. Your wires should be neatly secured. Go into the build with the idea that everything will be visible, no matter how hidden it might be. If you put that kind of attention to detail into your install, chances are stacked your favor that the install will come out much to your liking.

Chazbo
02-11-2004, 10:23 PM
Geez - a highschool kid who speaks in complete sentences and real paragraphs. A welcome change.


Your not alone buddy...I'm a little gr 10er and i got a half *** decent sterio in my truck

Coincidence???

helotaxi
02-11-2004, 10:30 PM
Coincidence???
More like typical...and a bit ironic... :uhoh:

LoudCrownVic
02-12-2004, 11:59 PM
Find some nice used stuff already in a box and save your money! Seriously, as long as it booms.

Car Trekker
02-14-2004, 09:08 AM
If you're on a budget, then ported is the way to go. One good ported sub will do as much as 2 in a sealed box with 1/2 the power.
Down the road you can use the smaller amp for the front, if you decide to upgrade.

Biggest mistake I see people make when buying a piece at a time is planning a whomping system, and for the years til it's finished they get to drive around with "half" a great system. Sh*t happens in life, and if you can't finish it, you never really get to enjoy it.

When I was young, and into home audio, I started buying my dream system.
Bought a Linn turntable (yeah vinyl, those round black things your parents used to have) for $2500, and my Mid/high speakers for $1200. Then I had 2 kids, so for the next 18 years I got to listen to $3700 worth of mids and highs, thru a Radioshack receiver with no bass.

Buy what gives you a complete working system now, with careful consideration for future upgrades.

Pretty common to hear "Well, as soon as I get my $1000 amp these subs are going to sound awesome".

Sure, 2 good sealed subs with a kilowatt will sound better than a single 12 ported with 200 watts, but look at the cost.
Probably the same output, and a bit smoother, but 4 times as expensive.
If you choose the right product, and design the box properly, it will be easy to sell if you want to go better 'cause it will be 10 times better than most of the crap out there.

There is no "best". Only "best for your taste and budget"

LoneRanger
02-14-2004, 11:15 AM
Yeah....what the last guy said!

My personal opinion (and humble one at that!) is that the box is what makes or breaks the install. If you do a good job on your box, you're already ahead of most people doing the ol' DIY install. If you're pretty sure you can build yourself a nice box without cutting off a thumb, I say go for it. Otherwise, I'd be happy to help you out :)

Secondly is making sure you have an adequet electrical system. If you're running more than 300 or 400w, you'll probably need to upgrade your battery and possibly alternator. Any time you add audio equipment (or anything that draws more than 20 amps for that matter) to your system you'll need to upgrade the wire that runs from the alternator to the battery and the one from the battery to the chassis.

I'm one of those guys who gets tired of my equipment real fast. Honestly, any setup, no matter how good, will only last about 6-8 months with me. I simply get tired of it and sell it so I can buy something new.

If you do a good job and don't cut any corners, it'll be easier to re-sell in the future, and who knows....you might get more out of it than you originally put in it.

At any rate, email me at donnballenger@gnomeaudio.com and I'll help you out in any way that I can, be it box plans, advice or building your box.