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View Full Version : What do these bullet-looking things do?



emilimo701
07-10-2010, 12:25 AM
http://images.sonicelectronix.com/images/155049/main/sr6500.jpg
http://images.sonicelectronix.com/images/428637/main/t2652s.jpg
http://images.sonicelectronix.com/images/444694/main/pc365c.jpg

To be taking up precious cone area, they must be serving some good purpose. Deflecting sound forward? Heat dissipation?

I did do about 3 google searches before deciding ask here :fyi:

Louisiana_CRX
07-10-2010, 12:26 AM
lulz...:D

KyleBechtold
07-10-2010, 12:26 AM
phase plugs

misfit138
07-10-2010, 12:33 AM
If you don't ask, you can't learn. :)

emilimo701
07-10-2010, 12:36 AM
okay. got it

is this a phase plug?

http://images.sonicelectronix.com/images/77936/main/c608gtimkii.jpg

Why does it look so different and... odd... ?

KyleBechtold
07-10-2010, 12:38 AM
post the actual link of that speaker and I will tell ya

ascitiesburn69
07-10-2010, 12:39 AM
Because they felt like making it that way??

emilimo701
07-10-2010, 12:42 AM
JBL (http://www.jbl.com/EN-US/Products/Pages/ProductDetails.aspx?PID=C608GTI%20MKII)

T3mpest
07-13-2010, 03:45 AM
lots of know it alls in this thread for not one person to actually answer his question. Just saying it's a phase plug probably doesn't help him much. A phase plug is used to improve the off axis response of a speaker. When a speaker is listened to with the cone not facing you (off axis) it begins to do something known as beam, or beaming. Basically the top end of the frequency spectrum will begin to taper off. This is due to the inherent cancellation of a speaker with itself at higher frequencies. Normally we consider a single speaker to act as a single point of sound, which it will when the wavelengths of sound are much bigger than the speaker. However, we can also think of it this way. A single 6inch speaker can be considered 10000x very tiny pistons all producing the same wave, or 100000x even smaller ones, etc, every point of the cone is moving and interacting with itself if the wavelengths are shorter than the cone itself. Because of this, bigger speakers have a smaller off axis frequency response as they begin to beam earlier. That's also part of why tweets are so small, to keep frequency the speaker beams very, very high up. Anyway a phase plug in the center of a speaker to keep the speaker from interacting with itself. Some of the soundwaves that would normally interact from one side or the other will hit the phase plug, bounce the other way and then not cancel out since they didnt' interact with each other. This somewhat random dispersion is still better than full on cancellation.


Phase plugs can also help with power handling depending on the material as they can help draw heat from the coil. Their effect on cone area is pretty minimal in most cases.

emilimo701
07-13-2010, 03:52 AM
lots of know it alls in this thread for not one person to actually answer his question. Just saying it's a phase plug probably doesn't help him much. A phase plug is used to improve the off axis response of a speaker. When a speaker is listened to with the cone not facing you (off axis) it begins to do something known as beam, or beaming. Basically the top end of the frequency spectrum will begin to taper off. This is due to the inherent cancellation of a speaker with itself at higher frequencies. Normally we consider a single speaker to act as a single point of sound, which it will when the wavelengths of sound are much bigger than the speaker. However, we can also think of it this way. A single 6inch speaker can be considered 10000x very tiny pistons all producing the same wave, or 100000x even smaller ones, etc, every point of the cone is moving and interacting with itself if the wavelengths are shorter than the cone itself. Because of this, bigger speakers have a smaller off axis frequency response as they begin to beam earlier. That's also part of why tweets are so small, to keep frequency the speaker beams very, very high up. Anyway a phase plug in the center of a speaker to keep the speaker from interacting with itself. Some of the soundwaves that would normally interact from one side or the other will hit the phase plug, bounce the other way and then not cancel out since they didnt' interact with each other. This somewhat random dispersion is still better than full on cancellation.


Phase plugs can also help with power handling depending on the material as they can help draw heat from the coil. Their effect on cone area is pretty minimal in most cases.

so does this make a significant difference even in a component system where the tweeters are placed optimally?

genxx
07-14-2010, 04:31 PM
Yes. The phase plug on a mid or midrange does not have anything to do with the tweeter unless we are talking a ring radiator tweeter.

Speaker placement no matter whether you have a speaker with a phase plug or not is very important. We could get into reflections ect. There is a lot to consider in the vehicle environment. You will always have to make a compromise some where.

If you want to learn about speaker beaming just google it and do some reading. The freq. at which a speaker will start to beam is based on the cone size/area.

This is pretty good easy to understand link on beaming. No super indepth but you should get the general idea.

The Low-Down on Dispersion - Welcome to the New Official ParadigmŪ Website. (http://www.paradigm.com/all-about-sound/the-low-down-on-dispersion)

Sometimes beaming may not be such a huge issue if you are trying to achieve something in a vehicle cabin. It all depends on what you are trying to achieve.