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View Full Version : Tools/supplies needed for a box building shop



neverfinished
02-27-2010, 12:41 AM
Im 17 yr's old in highschool and ive taken 6 months of training in a carpentry class at a career training center (not wood shop at my HS). My dad used to be a carpenter so i already have alot of wood working tools and im going to set up a workshop in my garage so i can build custom speaker boxes for fun. Im really viewing it as a hobby though rather than a business so im not looking to spend thousands.

So heres what i think i need...
What misc. items am i missing or is there something better for one of the items i listed?
.table saw
.circular saw
.speed square
.box building program,suggestions please?
.MDF for the boxes and cheap construction grade plywood for practicing on
.Router
.orbital/belt sander

And heres what im unsure of
1.what type of glue is best to use to seal all edges?
2.Whats the best way to mark the lines and cut them since speaker boxes need to be EXTREMELY accurate for everything to fit and sound proper. Im always accurate within 1/16'' but would you suggest i use a laser to travel along the wood and cut along that,snap a line or just mark it old fashion?
3.For cutting holes do you suggest a router with an attachment to cut perfect circles or a jigsaw?

kmanian
02-27-2010, 12:45 AM
search, you will find everything there

gl

kyleorsini
02-27-2010, 12:47 AM
if your dads a carpenter and youve taken classes shouldnt you know what you need..

neverfinished
02-27-2010, 12:51 AM
ill just research it on-line,thought itd be kinda fun to hear what you guys had to say but nvm

Pauliesnite93
02-27-2010, 01:17 PM
for glue i use titebond original wood glue. and my first box was off like 1/4 off on some of the peaces all we did was just put alot of glue there and a bunch of screws and it was air tite

supermaxx123
02-27-2010, 05:25 PM
Im 17 yr's old in highschool and ive taken 6 months of training in a carpentry class at a career training center (not wood shop at my HS). My dad used to be a carpenter so i already have alot of wood working tools and im going to set up a workshop in my garage so i can build custom speaker boxes for fun. Im really viewing it as a hobby though rather than a business so im not looking to spend thousands.

So heres what i think i need...
What misc. items am i missing or is there something better for one of the items i listed?
.table saw
.circular saw
.speed square
.box building program,suggestions please?
.MDF for the boxes and cheap construction grade plywood for practicing on
.Router
.orbital/belt sander

And heres what im unsure of
1.what type of glue is best to use to seal all edges?
2.Whats the best way to mark the lines and cut them since speaker boxes need to be EXTREMELY accurate for everything to fit and sound proper. Im always accurate within 1/16'' but would you suggest i use a laser to travel along the wood and cut along that,snap a line or just mark it old fashion?
3.For cutting holes do you suggest a router with an attachment to cut perfect circles or a jigsaw?

i'm pretty sure if you dads a carpenter, your pretty much set. nothing else you need other than measurements really. i use a jigsaw for holes or holesaws for small holes, i would like to get myself a jig for my router but the price scares me, i might make one one day if im bored enough.
no need to mark anyhting if your table saw is accurate and has a good fence.
i would suggest bar clamps, anywhere from 12"-48" they help, at least they have helped me quite a bit.

neverfinished
02-27-2010, 05:37 PM
for glue i use titebond original wood glue. and my first box was off like 1/4 off on some of the peaces all we did was just put alot of glue there and a bunch of screws and it was air tite

1/4 off? dang lol. All the sits say to use carpenters glue so ill probably just use that.


i'm pretty sure if you dads a carpenter, your pretty much set. nothing else you need other than measurements really. i use a jigsaw for holes or holesaws for small holes, i would like to get myself a jig for my router but the price scares me, i might make one one day if im bored enough.
no need to mark anyhting if your table saw is accurate and has a good fence.
i would suggest bar clamps, anywhere from 12"-48" they help, at least they have helped me quite a bit.

yep i should be pretty set, im going to need to pick up some clamps though so ill check out the ones you suggested. I know i can cut wood pretty well but i have 2 more things i need

1.when i was researching how to build a box on-line everyone says to use a caulking gun with silicone sealant and to also use glue to seal the edges. So do i use silicone then glue or just 1 and if only use 1 which 1 do i use? lol kinda confusing sorry

2.Whats the more user friendly subwoofer box design software as i know almost NOTHING about ''tuning'' a box

Twisted_0912
02-27-2010, 05:46 PM
use titebond II for glue. if your cuts are accurate you dont need anything to seal the edges. your dads a carpenter and he doesnt have any clamps?

ajspellm
02-27-2010, 05:51 PM
I believe you usually glue all the pieces you put on the go back and seal all the seams with the silicone to make sure that you have a air tight box. I am building a box right now and am waiting for my silicone to dry so I can go out and paint my port before fastening it. Have you ever made a box before or first time? I just do my boxes when I get new subs but I have found it a lot easier all around by just having where you buy your mdf just having them cut the wood. Mdf makes a hell of a mess cutting it at home and I dont like to clean it up lol. I had all of my pieces cut today for free at lowes. The guy forgot how many cuts and he just said dont worry about it. I guess if you are doing it as a hobby though you wont mind. Anyway have fun with it and do a build log of your first box.

maritoze
02-27-2010, 05:51 PM
You're the first person I've see from SJ on here. Good luck with your box building. Titebond II is what I use too. Maybe a brad nailer if you don't have one, I prefer it to screws. Practice practice practice my friend.

schackel
02-27-2010, 05:52 PM
hmmmmmmm

supermaxx123
02-27-2010, 05:58 PM
1/4 off? dang lol. All the sits say to use carpenters glue so ill probably just use that.



yep i should be pretty set, im going to need to pick up some clamps though so ill check out the ones you suggested. I know i can cut wood pretty well but i have 2 more things i need

1.when i was researching how to build a box on-line everyone says to use a caulking gun with silicone sealant and to also use glue to seal the edges. So do i use silicone then glue or just 1 and if only use 1 which 1 do i use? lol kinda confusing sorry

2.Whats the more user friendly subwoofer box design software as i know almost NOTHING about ''tuning'' a box

just build sealed. I used to use silicone before i would put top on but i feel the glue should work on it's own. using silicone won't hurt, just add to price and time and if your in no hurry and dont mind another $20(for a good cualking gun) then go for it. most online calculator work as far as tuning, for frequency response i use winisd but i've heard that program *****, i still use it lol.
a harbor frieght will have the bar clamps you need, i spent about $70 on them but i feel i need more.

neverfinished
02-27-2010, 06:25 PM
use titebond II for glue. if your cuts are accurate you dont need anything to seal the edges. your dads a carpenter and he doesnt have any clamps?
lol he WAS a carpenter about 20 years ago. I still have alot of tools like table saw,several circular saws,speed squares and so on but i have to find it in my mess of a garage. I'll check out that glue thanks.


I believe you usually glue all the pieces you put on the go back and seal all the seams with the silicone to make sure that you have a air tight box. I am building a box right now and am waiting for my silicone to dry so I can go out and paint my port before fastening it. Have you ever made a box before or first time? I just do my boxes when I get new subs but I have found it a lot easier all around by just having where you buy your mdf just having them cut the wood. Mdf makes a hell of a mess cutting it at home and I dont like to clean it up lol. I had all of my pieces cut today for free at lowes. The guy forgot how many cuts and he just said dont worry about it. I guess if you are doing it as a hobby though you wont mind. Anyway have fun with it and do a build log of your first box.

alrite thanks and once i clear up a spot in my garage ill definitley make a build log of my first box. I have made a box before but it was a joke before i was really into car audio at all.


You're the first person I've see from SJ on here. Good luck with your box building. Titebond II is what I use too. Maybe a brad nailer if you don't have one, I prefer it to screws. Practice practice practice my friend.

SJ FTW haha, Im going to stick to screws for now just because if i decide to modify anything its easier to get them out.


hmmmmmmm
ok?


just build sealed. I used to use silicone before i would put top on but i feel the glue should work on it's own. using silicone won't hurt, just add to price and time and if your in no hurry and dont mind another $20(for a good cualking gun) then go for it. most online calculator work as far as tuning, for frequency response i use winisd but i've heard that program *****, i still use it lol.
a harbor frieght will have the bar clamps you need, i spent about $70 on them but i feel i need more.
I already got a few top notch caulking gun's so thats no issue, Ill check out harbor tools for the clamps thanks, but theres none of em local for me so ill probaly just use home depot if they have comparable prices/products. I have 2 friends that need boxes so ill probably start out with making them boxes for there 12'' and 10'' sub's. I just need to learn the terminology for these box building program it feels like im reading chinese lol

supermaxx123
02-27-2010, 08:55 PM
i paid about $5-$9 a clamp, depending on size, i have gone to lowes a couple times and home depot and never even thought of looking at prices. GL with your first boxes, it's really not that difficult.

neverfinished
02-28-2010, 03:44 AM
i paid about $5-$9 a clamp, depending on size, i have gone to lowes a couple times and home depot and never even thought of looking at prices. GL with your first boxes, it's really not that difficult.
thanks last thing i need is to learn how to use the programs :D

on1wheel01
02-28-2010, 11:13 AM
Yes tite bond 2 ftw. And harbour freight clamps also lowes ones are about twice the price for the same thing. Get a plunge router and a circle jog for cut outs. Get a fixed base router and a flush trim bit. I always make my panels bigger than I need them and just trim off the excess. Also Maybe a brad nailer / stapler. A good table saw. I also just purchased a 50" straight edge so I can rip big pieces of mdf down with a skil saw(man that was a good investment).

on1wheel01
02-28-2010, 11:14 AM
Also I just use the re calc to design my boxes. RE Enclosure Calculator (http://reaudio.com/speaker_box/LPort_Box_Calc.html)

neverfinished
02-28-2010, 05:42 PM
Yes tite bond 2 ftw. And harbour freight clamps also lowes ones are about twice the price for the same thing. Get a plunge router and a circle jog for cut outs. Get a fixed base router and a flush trim bit. I always make my panels bigger than I need them and just trim off the excess. Also Maybe a brad nailer / stapler. A good table saw. I also just purchased a 50" straight edge so I can rip big pieces of mdf down with a skil saw(man that was a good investment).
i got a table saw and a router i may or may not have the special circle attachments but i can get those pretty easy. For my circles im thinking use a jigsaw instead of a router and just get a special jigsaw circle attachment. Im probably going to use screws instead of a brad nailer just out of preference i may change my mind though once i start building boxes. Why would you rip with a skil saw if you have a table saw?


Also I just use the re calc to design my boxes. RE Enclosure Calculator (http://reaudio.com/speaker_box/LPort_Box_Calc.html)
this is probably a retarded question but how do you go from band pass to port to sealed boxes with the calc?

spltuscon
02-28-2010, 05:58 PM
When you build larger boxes the sizes often require more capability than the table saw will allow (most table saws max out at 36"). Titebond II is the best glue, and you use silicone on the interior seams after the box is built (and the glue is dried) to ensure airtight seal.

Twisted_0912
02-28-2010, 06:16 PM
Also I just use the re calc to design my boxes. RE Enclosure Calculator (http://reaudio.com/speaker_box/LPort_Box_Calc.html)

that **** is off :fyi:

on1wheel01
02-28-2010, 08:31 PM
+1 on large boxes. I have been building pretty dayum big boxes for customers and the table saw just wont cut it. So the straight edge and skil is a must. Re is off a bit but not bad.

neverfinished
03-01-2010, 12:01 AM
When you build larger boxes the sizes often require more capability than the table saw will allow (most table saws max out at 36"). Titebond II is the best glue, and you use silicone on the interior seams after the box is built (and the glue is dried) to ensure airtight seal.
thanks,as far as the table saw maxing out at 36 inches all you do is set up some sawhorses on the end of your table saw where wood comes out level with the table saw itself. Have one guy push in from the side while you push through and you'll get a perfectly straight cut with a pretty **** long piece of wood. Ive done it before with 6 foot long sheets of wood


that **** is off :fyi:
Ill just design my own boxes, I can design **** pretty easy since we had to draw house plans and all for my carpentry class a box plan will be relatively simple and my dad is also an engineer (currently) so he can help me out if necessary. BUT what i dont get is how do you determine how many cubic ft. a certain sub needs and how do you tune a box to a certain frequency.


+1 on large boxes. I have been building pretty dayum big boxes for customers and the table saw just wont cut it. So the straight edge and skil is a must. Re is off a bit but not bad.
nice maybe i can be a pro box builder to...someday :)

on1wheel01
03-01-2010, 12:47 AM
thanks,as far as the table saw maxing out at 36 inches all you do is set up some sawhorses on the end of your table saw where wood comes out level with the table saw itself. Have one guy push in from the side while you push through and you'll get a perfectly straight cut with a pretty **** long piece of wood. Ive done it before with 6 foot long sheets of wood


Ill just design my own boxes, I can design **** pretty easy since we had to draw house plans and all for my carpentry class a box plan will be relatively simple and my dad is also an engineer (currently) so he can help me out if necessary. BUT what i dont get is how do you determine how many cubic ft. a certain sub needs and how do you tune a box to a certain frequency.


nice maybe i can be a pro box builder to...someday :)

Come on guy common sense the saw horses help nothing if you dont havea the cut you need. The rip fence is what we're talkin bout. Like my saw I think it does 34-36 or something well what if i need a 40" piece yea i could flip it if the other sides smaller but what if it's a whole sheet what then. Thats where the straight edge comes in. Ok you can design a box but you dont understand how to get cubic feet and tuning(fyi thats designing a box bro). Not tryin to sound like a **** but u gotta listen to what we are sayin. And im no pro by any means I just do a nice job at it.

on1wheel01
03-01-2010, 12:47 AM
thanks,as far as the table saw maxing out at 36 inches all you do is set up some sawhorses on the end of your table saw where wood comes out level with the table saw itself. Have one guy push in from the side while you push through and you'll get a perfectly straight cut with a pretty **** long piece of wood. Ive done it before with 6 foot long sheets of wood


Ill just design my own boxes, I can design **** pretty easy since we had to draw house plans and all for my carpentry class a box plan will be relatively simple and my dad is also an engineer (currently) so he can help me out if necessary. BUT what i dont get is how do you determine how many cubic ft. a certain sub needs and how do you tune a box to a certain frequency.


nice maybe i can be a pro box builder to...someday :)

Come on guy common sense the saw horses help nothing if you dont havea the cut you need. The rip fence is what we're talkin bout. Like my saw I think it does 34-36 or something well what if i need a 40" piece yea i could flip it if the other sides smaller but what if it's a whole sheet what then. Thats where the straight edge comes in. Ok you can design a box but you dont understand how to get cubic feet and tuning(fyi thats designing a box bro). Not tryin to sound like a **** but u gotta listen to what we are sayin. And im no pro by any means I just do a nice job at it.

neverfinished
03-01-2010, 03:25 AM
Come on guy common sense the saw horses help nothing if you dont havea the cut you need. The rip fence is what we're talkin bout. Like my saw I think it does 34-36 or something well what if i need a 40" piece yea i could flip it if the other sides smaller but what if it's a whole sheet what then. Thats where the straight edge comes in. Ok you can design a box but you dont understand how to get cubic feet and tuning(fyi thats designing a box bro). Not tryin to sound like a **** but u gotta listen to what we are sayin. And im no pro by any means I just do a nice job at it.

heres a quick rough diagram of what im saying to do.
http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e205/superman2054/learn.png
How would that not work ive used this method several times before with no issues at all.Not trying to be stubborn or douchey i just dont quite get what your saying

Also when you say your table saw maxes out at 34-36'' are you talking about its length? because you can just keep pushing the wood after it goes off the end of the table saw as long as you keep holding it properly which can take more than one person if its large.

spltuscon
03-01-2010, 09:54 AM
I see what you're saying but I always work alone so having a second person push isn't an option for me. I wasn't referring to the length, I have several roller stands and an outfeed table, I was referring to the "rip capacity" which is the largest cut that you can do to the right of the blade (accurately, with the fence square). If the 2 man method works for you and you can be accurate, then that's great and you should use it, just not something I can do.
The RE calculator is off, box design is a science and an art if you intend to do anything outside of very basic design. There are some good basic guidelines that you can follow with acceptable results, but in general I think its one of the most misunderstood concepts in car audio. Most people think you should go by manufacturer specs or the world will end....a good designer/builder can almost always achieve better results with alternative designs. Testing and experience as well as the willingness to think "outside the box" and try new things are the keys to becoming a good designer.

neverfinished
03-01-2010, 09:08 PM
I see what you're saying but I always work alone so having a second person push isn't an option for me. I wasn't referring to the length, I have several roller stands and an outfeed table, I was referring to the "rip capacity" which is the largest cut that you can do to the right of the blade (accurately, with the fence square). If the 2 man method works for you and you can be accurate, then that's great and you should use it, just not something I can do.
The RE calculator is off, box design is a science and an art if you intend to do anything outside of very basic design. There are some good basic guidelines that you can follow with acceptable results, but in general I think its one of the most misunderstood concepts in car audio. Most people think you should go by manufacturer specs or the world will end....a good designer/builder can almost always achieve better results with alternative designs. Testing and experience as well as the willingness to think "outside the box" and try new things are the keys to becoming a good designer.

ah i see, well if you work alone that definitley wouldnt be an option. Thanks for the advice on box design ill be sure to tread carefully into the box building arena :D

psych0ticnemes1
03-02-2010, 10:01 AM
I find that the easiest way to cut large sheets down to size is by laying them on a 2x4 frame on the floor and using a home made T-Square that is perfectly square to the factory edge and 4 feet long. One end of the square has a cleat that is placed along the edge of the sheet while the T portion rests on top of the sheet and serves as a guide for your circular saw. You make one mark where you want to cut, lay your T square guide flush with the sheet edge and cut away. You end up with perfectly square cuts every time.

Where the guide line is you simply run your saw across it and it'll give you exactly where to start your cut if you line it up with your mark.

http://img684.imageshack.us/img684/8161/tsquare.jpg (http://img684.imageshack.us/i/tsquare.jpg/)