PDA

View Full Version : air flow vs. textured paint?



dvldogyut
11-18-2009, 09:55 PM
i am planning on doing a box with plexi glass inserts, and am wanting to paint the inside of the box with some textured splatter like paint, almost like bed liner but alot thiner. will this affect the airflow much?

schackel
11-18-2009, 10:07 PM
no prolly not. you just cant go crazy

dvldogyut
11-18-2009, 11:11 PM
no prolly not. you just cant go crazy

ok

TnT_Sounds
11-18-2009, 11:12 PM
Ever ran your hand across sandpaper?

AudioXtremes
11-18-2009, 11:19 PM
You prolly won't notice by ear but the smoother surface would prolly meter a few tenths higher.

Street DreamsCC
11-18-2009, 11:24 PM
if for looks then do it. If its for spl comps, dont do it. The smoother the better.

dvldogyut
11-18-2009, 11:26 PM
for looks, im not into numbers, just sound quality and hard hitting lows.

dvldogyut
11-18-2009, 11:26 PM
Ever ran your hand across sandpaper?

yeah

Street DreamsCC
11-18-2009, 11:29 PM
if its only looks and you dont care about spl competing then go ahead. It will not effect the overall performance at all. It will just drop the spl alittle. But chances are you wouldnt notice the difference. Just dont pile it on there.

dvldogyut
11-18-2009, 11:40 PM
if its only looks and you dont care about spl competing then go ahead. It will not effect the overall performance at all. It will just drop the spl alittle. But chances are you wouldnt notice the difference. Just dont pile it on there.

ok thanks.

IDSkoT
11-19-2009, 12:03 AM
Ever ran your hand across sandpaper?

I ran my *** across it once.

mlo
11-19-2009, 12:36 AM
In many applications where volumetric efficiency is key smooth surfaces can be counter productive. There are obviously many variables, but smooth surfaces typically have the most surface tension. Considering the air speeds in a sub application I would expect it to be negligable. Sand-casted surfaces will often out perform a smooth bore . Look up Laminar flow for some interesting reading.

Johnny Law.Lulz
11-19-2009, 12:37 AM
In many applications where volumetric efficiency is key smooth surfaces can be counter productive. There are obviously many variables, but smooth surfaces typically have the most surface tension. Considering the air speeds in a sub application I would expect it to be negligable. Sand-casted surfaces will often out perform a smooth bore . Look up Laminar flow for some interesting reading.

OH ****.

Dude got yall.

mlstrass
11-19-2009, 12:38 AM
also think of a golf ball or when nascar started putting dimples in the chambers of cylinder heads to improve airflow.

Until someone builds an enclosure and tests it out smooth and then paints it with textured paint it's pretty much speculation...

Johnny Law.Lulz
11-19-2009, 12:40 AM
also think of a golf ball or when nascar started putting dimples in the chambers of cylinder heads to improve airflow.

Until someone builds an enclosure and tests it out smooth and then paints it with textured paint it's pretty much speculation...

IMO that word is a reoccuring thing in this hobby.

TnT_Sounds
11-19-2009, 12:43 AM
I ran my *** across it once.

I've always wanted to try that:D

Instead, I had a brilliant idea to ride from a 3 story roof top to a 2 story roof and slid on my ***.

You think it feels the same?:confused:

TnT_Sounds
11-19-2009, 12:44 AM
In many applications where volumetric efficiency is key smooth surfaces can be counter productive. There are obviously many variables, but smooth surfaces typically have the most surface tension. Considering the air speeds in a sub application I would expect it to be negligable. Sand-casted surfaces will often out perform a smooth bore . Look up Laminar flow for some interesting reading.

You seem quite intelligent sir!:veryhapp:

mlo
11-19-2009, 12:01 PM
also think of a golf ball or when nascar started putting dimples in the chambers of cylinder heads to improve airflow.

Until someone builds an enclosure and tests it out smooth and then paints it with textured paint it's pretty much speculation...

Well sort-of...The dimpling in combustion chambers is typically to promote mixture tumble and dispersion...especially at high rpm's.

Another huge influence on flow such as these ports would be entrance and exit shape. You can fool/manipulate things...

There is tons of imperical data on this subject that can be drawn from.