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LoneRanger
10-14-2003, 03:45 PM
I'm having a little problem here.....

To enhance the appearance and strength of my boxes, I decided to use a 1/8th" countersink to help hide the screws and get them in a bit deeper. The problem lies in the fact that I keep breaking the countersinking bits after 10 or 15 uses. It's not like I'm abusing them, it's just that 1" MDF is about as pliable as granite :(

I took the countersinks back to the "Do It" center, and they refunded my money (god bless vermont american and their lifetime breakage guarantee), however I'm left without a way to countersink my screws.

I was using a #8 countersinking bit for wood by vermont american. if anyone has any suggestions for a suitable replacement, i'd appreciate it.

tommyk90
10-14-2003, 03:49 PM
I just used a drill bit that was the size of the screw head and drilled down as deep in the MDF as i felt fit. It isn't the most accurate way, but it worked fine and my screws are countersunk.

LoneRanger
10-14-2003, 03:54 PM
I just used a drill bit that was the size of the screw head and drilled down as deep in the MDF as i felt fit. It isn't the most accurate way, but it worked fine and my screws are countersunk.

that's what i was doing before. it's not accurate (you'll usually get one or two of the bastards that want to poke out the side) and it doesn't sink the screw into the wood as far as i'd like

maylar
10-14-2003, 04:59 PM
I never cared for the countersink bits, since they tend to be cheesy like you've noticed. What I use is a ~real~ countersink. It's a special cone shaped cutter that you use as a separate operation. Best to have a drill press so you can control depth, but they work in a hand drill too when you get the hang of it.

Sears has them:

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&pid=00967164000

tommyk90
10-14-2003, 05:03 PM
that's what i was doing before. it's not accurate (you'll usually get one or two of the bastards that want to poke out the side) and it doesn't sink the screw into the wood as far as i'd like

Eh, it works for me.

ramos
10-15-2003, 01:07 PM
Maylar is the man with the plan. That's exactly what I use. I first drill all of my pilot holes. Then I go back with the countersink bit. Works like a charm. I have been using the same set of craftsmen countersinks for about 10 years now. :)

SPLThunder
10-15-2003, 10:53 PM
My countersink is an 18v Makita with enough torque to peel out my t-bird (jk)

LoneRanger
10-16-2003, 03:04 PM
My countersink is an 18v Makita with enough torque to peel out my t-bird (jk)

That's not a very healthy way to countersink screws.....especially in masonite MDF.

Overtorquing screws leads to cracked, warped and weakened boards.

SPLThunder
10-16-2003, 03:51 PM
That's not a very healthy way to countersink screws.....especially in masonite MDF.

Overtorquing screws leads to cracked, warped and weakened boards.


thats why i said (jk)

and i do use a separate countersink bit just so all my holes are the same depth and then i bondo over the screws, paint over that, and it looks like you never screwed anything in the first place.

infrabass
10-16-2003, 04:42 PM
Like Tommy, I first drill the hole where I want the screw to go in, then after doing quite a few of those I go back with a larger bit, and do a quick drill and it cuts out the most perfect hole for the heads, then I just hand screw the screws in (I hand screw to avoid damaging tools and screws). Then once your done, you just make it all even and smooth with silicone and a belt sander. Works like a charm :D

ss3079
10-16-2003, 06:06 PM
I never cared for the countersink bits, since they tend to be cheesy like you've noticed. What I use is a ~real~ countersink. It's a special cone shaped cutter that you use as a separate operation. Best to have a drill press so you can control depth, but they work in a hand drill too when you get the hang of it.

Sears has them:

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/product.do?BV_UseBVCookie=Yes&vertical=TOOL&pid=00967164000

This is the option that worked the best in past experiences ...

- Steve :)