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Nut Hair Trick
06-24-2009, 09:06 PM
I know absolutely nothing about them but I am about to purchase my first one for my present sub enclosure and others to follow. Therefore, I have some questions.
How do you see what you're cutting when using one? Everyone I looked at at Lowes had a bunch of stuff up top, and then a base, with little visabilty to see what you're cutting. Do they(most) come with a special sight that you look into while cutting?

Double baffle board cutting. I've seen people cut circles in their double baffled enclosure that would go all the way into the first baffle and be like 3/4" wide. What bit do I use for that? Mortison<SP>? What type bit do I use to finish the hole that that speaker will actually drop down into? After cutting the lip part on the top baffle, I've seen people leave the inside circle of the top baffle. Do you cut around that?

I plan to purchase the Jasper Jig from the Parts Express site so I should at least be able to get the important hole cut:)

Rounding corners, what bit and size to round them thangs?
If someone could give me an idea of the bits need for different styles of enclosure builds, and it's function, that would be lovely. Thanks for any help guys.

BassMechkanic
06-25-2009, 12:39 AM
many bits, do differentg things, i have hunderds of dollers in bits, i have one bit that cost $120, that is a rabbit set and would be used to do the double baffled counter sunk you asked about.

Nut Hair Trick
06-25-2009, 01:35 AM
wow, surely that's not the cheapest I could get the rabbit bit is it?

Pioneer~Saturn
06-25-2009, 01:41 AM
Using a rabbit set to make your countersink hole bigger is a waste of time when you can simply cut it out with your jasper jig and screw+glue the two panels together.

What you'll want will most likely be a basic 1/4" straight bit, a good handful of roundover bits, and a flush-trim bit along with your jasper circle jig...and from there if you run into situations that you need something special, go get it accordingly.

And you'll be able to see what youre cutting from multiple angles when cutting...but a good amount have a clear plastic piece over one spot in particular so you dont have dust and chips flying at you...but you should be able to see what youre doing quite well from almost any angle.

Nut Hair Trick
06-25-2009, 01:55 AM
Using a rabbit set to make your countersink hole bigger is a waste of time when you can simply cut it out with your jasper jig and screw+glue the two panels together.

What you'll want will most likely be a basic 1/4" straight bit, a good handful of roundover bits, and a flush-trim bit along with your jasper circle jig...and from there if you run into situations that you need something special, go get it accordingly.

And you'll be able to see what youre cutting from multiple angles when cutting...but a good amount have a clear plastic piece over one spot in particular so you dont have dust and chips flying at you...but you should be able to see what youre doing quite well from almost any angle.
Excellent, just what I need to know. It makes sense cutting the baffles seperate then screwing and gluing. I'll be looking for those other bits too, Thanks.

ramos
06-25-2009, 01:25 PM
Using a rabbit set to make your countersink hole bigger is a waste of time when you can simply cut it out with your jasper jig and screw+glue the two panels together.

What you'll want will most likely be a basic 1/4" straight bit, a good handful of roundover bits, and a flush-trim bit along with your jasper circle jig...and from there if you run into situations that you need something special, go get it accordingly.

And you'll be able to see what youre cutting from multiple angles when cutting...but a good amount have a clear plastic piece over one spot in particular so you dont have dust and chips flying at you...but you should be able to see what youre doing quite well from almost any angle.


and when doing double (or more) baffles, line up the baffles, drill the center point for a couple sheets at a time. :)

Nut Hair Trick
06-25-2009, 01:31 PM
Cool, hadn't thought of that. Will do. I was wondering how they would line up right, and here it is.

Nut Hair Trick
06-25-2009, 01:40 PM
flush-trim bit.. just watched a video of someone using this. That thing is bad ***, I will get one of these for sure.

ramos
06-25-2009, 03:42 PM
By a good one, and add a dab of loctite to the screw holding the bearing on. :)

Nut Hair Trick
06-25-2009, 05:51 PM
By a good one, and add a dab of loctite to the screw holding the bearing on. :)

Buy a good flush trim bit? Or a good router? or both?

91Chevy
06-25-2009, 07:50 PM
Buy a good flush trim bit? Or a good router? or both?

He was talking about the bit, but obviously both :)

ramos
06-26-2009, 07:52 AM
Buy a good flush trim bit? Or a good router? or both?

Both actually. Bits are not a place to cheap out. Better bits will outlast cheap bits by a far enough margin, that you end up spending more on the cheap bits :)

91Chevy
06-26-2009, 07:44 PM
Sorry for thread-jacking, but I'm considering buying a router in a couple weeks. What are the proper names for '1/4" Straight Bits'? Besides that (for cutting speaker rings, etc), and round-over bit(s), is there anything else needed to have just the bare minimum of what's required? Thanks.

mmouse57
07-29-2009, 06:47 PM
get upsiral bit
http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10051&langId=-1&catalogId=10053&productId=100660697

home depot of lowes
$20 bucks

this and 3 other bits

a 3/16in roundover

a top mount baring flush bit 'called a temple bit'
a bottom mount baring bit or a flush mount bit

:)

rival904
07-29-2009, 09:08 PM
get upsiral bit
http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10051&langId=-1&catalogId=10053&productId=100660697

home depot of lowes
$20 bucks

this and 3 other bits

a 3/16in roundover

a top mount baring flush bit 'called a temple bit'
a bottom mount baring bit or a flush mount bit

:)

Use the first bit instead of a flushtrim bit when cutting speaker holes?

dappa5
07-29-2009, 09:32 PM
i have a jasper jig and i'd recommend using a 3/8" bit instead of the recommended 1/4" that jasper says to use (you will have to add 1/4 to all your measurements ) but when cutting 3/4 mdf you will see

just a suggestion i kno the 1/4 does do the cuts but the 3/8 does them more easily

rival904
07-29-2009, 09:42 PM
Still didnt answer my question, are you talking about a flush trim bit? or that other bit that looks like a drill bit?

dappa5
07-29-2009, 09:47 PM
i'm talking about striaght cut bits
but you can use that bit if you have a plunge router but it tends to burn a little when going thru 3/4 mdf
it's just as easy to drill out a hole at appropriate dia and use a straight cutter

hempy
08-04-2009, 05:56 PM
If you haven't already purchased your router, you may want to look at Sears. I got a Craftsman plunge/static base set for about $100. It came with 1/2" and 1/4" collets, which has proved invaluable. It also has shields for dust management (via a shop-vac), and a fence attachment. The variable speed is also very nice. The Craftsman power tools only have 1 year warranties (as opposed to their handtools), but if you're not using the thing every single day, it'll probably have a long life. I've been using mine off and on since '07.

As far a s bits go, I use a spiral upcut bit (as previously mentioned) for all of my straight cutting and when using the Jasper Jig. It won't dull as quickly, as there is a greater cutting surface, and as long as you take a 3/4" piece of MDF in sections (1/8"-3/8"), it shouldn't burn. MDF is brutal on router bits, since a lot of it is glue.

Roundover bits... If you're working exclusively with 3/4" MDF, then you probably will only need one bit. I use a lot of the smaller radius bits (3/8", 1/2"), but I also have a 1" roundover bit that I got on ebay that has been great for boxes, as the cut goes past the butt joint and really cleans it up. It has a 1/2" shank, so the bigger collet on my router is great for these bits. I'm not sure if the seller still has these bits, but I remember it being really cheap compared to the other large radius roundover bits I could find.

That's all I can really think of right now. I'm sure I'll think of more later.