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View Full Version : Do Hertz need a little "break in" playing time?



Nicky Pass
05-24-2009, 11:48 AM
I got all of my system installed yesterday....JL Stealth box, Hertz HSK 165s and an Alpine PDX5. At first, I thought they sound okay...but I was expecting more! Throughout the night, I noticed they seemed to get louder and clearer. Now I can honestly say I'm impressed.

bamaboy
05-24-2009, 12:18 PM
expecting more as in more what?

it takes more than puttinf in nice speakers to get really good sound

Nicky Pass
05-24-2009, 12:47 PM
I had the doors dynamated, the 5x7 plates sealed to the door and they have like 200 watts rms going to them and I though AT FIRST, they'd sound amazing....they didn't live up to the hype. Then I played with the x-over frequencies and the EQ on the head unit and now they sound like what everyone has them was describing. I think it was a combo of a little tweaking and maybe a little break in that did it. That why I was asking if they need a little break in.

Hoodlum007
05-24-2009, 01:54 PM
All speakers will sound better once they are broken in.

DNick454
05-24-2009, 01:56 PM
Yeah, the spiders and soft parts on speakers are a little stiff when you first get them. After a little playtime, they loosen up a bit and they should sound louder as well as richer.

Hoodlum007
05-24-2009, 01:59 PM
One of my comp sets stunk up my entire car for days while the extra glue burned and the comps broke in.

headless
05-24-2009, 02:08 PM
Yes, speakers generally require a break-in period to sound their best. Rainbow cites 50 hours break-in period in several places in their documentation, for example. I'm sure Hertz are the same way.

squeak9798
05-24-2009, 03:27 PM
It shouldn't take more than a few seconds of decent excursion for a drivers suspension to permanently "break in". Anything beyond that is likely either 1) psychoacoustics or 2) you becoming used to the sound of the speakers. There may be temporary changes in compliance that occur if you played them continuously for a long period of time, but these would not be permanent.

azimuth
05-24-2009, 03:31 PM
It shouldn't take more than a few seconds of decent excursion for a drivers suspension to permanently "break in". Anything beyond that is likely either 1) psychoacoustics or 2) you becoming used to the sound of the speakers. There may be temporary changes in compliance that occur if you played them continuously for a long period of time, but these would not be permanent.

agreed. just by thinking that they might sound a little better, could make them sound better to your ear, even though nothing really changed at all.

Nicky Pass
05-24-2009, 04:16 PM
The installer and I tweaked everything at the volume level of 28 out of 35 on the head unit. When I put it to 30 it sounds soooooooooooo good!! I love the fact that my mid bass can vibrate my pants leg!

Ferendon
05-24-2009, 05:06 PM
OMGz! Vibrating pants!
The PDX5 is a kick *** amp, but if you're wanting to really sound good, switch over to the PDX4.100 and PDX1.600. Double your sub power, extra 25w rated on the speakers, which is more like 40-50 watts difference, true output. Not to mention the midrange output of the PDX 4-channels is much richer than the PDX5, probably due to the extra power.

squeak9798
05-24-2009, 06:43 PM
I love the fact that my mid bass can vibrate my pants leg!

Most people try to avoid that as the tactile sensation gives away the location of the midbass driver.

kevin lu
05-24-2009, 11:27 PM
i have 2 set of Hertz HSK165 component with a ARC Audio K Series 90watts.4 they sound good but not enough so i replace the front speaker with the Polk SR6500 component fade most to the front and they sound a lot softer.

FoxPro5
05-26-2009, 02:27 PM
Yes, speakers generally require a break-in period to sound their best. Rainbow cites 50 hours break-in period in several places in their documentation, for example. I'm sure Hertz are the same way.

Complete bullshit. You've been demoted, please clean out your desk. Thank you.

FoxPro5
05-26-2009, 02:30 PM
the midrange output of the PDX 4-channels is much richer than the PDX5, probably due to the extra power.

Not probably: definitely. :) Either that, or it's in your head. Either way, it doesn't matter because your ears are pleased.

headless
05-27-2009, 09:43 AM
Complete bullshit. You've been demoted, please clean out your desk. Thank you.

Nice, dude. If rainbow says it takes 50 hours break-in time on their drivers, i'd tend to believe them - they designed them, they measure their TSP's - so they are going to be the ones who can tell me if the TSP's change during the first hours of play. They say they do.

Furthermore, for the first few hours of play with 1 broken in sub and 1 brand new sub, it was quite noticeable - the speakers were not playing in sync... tight bass hits sounded like they were playing out of phase or something; like one woofer was delayed or playing slightly different frequencies. After 20-30 hours of play the subs blended together; now I can't hear a difference; it sounds like 1 sub.

Call it psychoacoustics if you want - that's the easy play, you get to claim that you simply know better than me and since I didn't MEASURE the difference on my new driver, I can't PROVE that there was a difference - therefore, there wasn't.

However, you can't prove there was not a difference either - you just think there wasn't, and the people who DO measure the drivers say that the parameters do change. Maybe they're lying - have you tested 2 rainbow woofers TSP's to see if they change from brand new vs. after 50 hours of play? Perhaps you can prove them wrong about their own speakers; can you link me to the tests?

FoxPro5
05-27-2009, 03:17 PM
Part of any manufacturer's responsibility is to cover their ***. With speakers, it seems part of this ***-covering is to recommend this "break in" time. They have zero control over how you use their product, so they also have to have recommendations and guidelines to warranty their equipment.

50 hours? If you listen to your system to 2 hours a day, it will take more than 3 weeks to "break them" in? What type of acid was the guy who invented this crap on? I want some! :rolleyes:

The only time I've heard a significant change in driver performance was with a few sets of factory-direct, brand spankin' new pro sound drivers with very stiff suspension and low xmax in the middle of winter. And with "break in" came physical warmth created by the driver getting moving which corresponded to a more "warmer" sound. But this took 4-5 min, not over two straight days of listening.

squeak9798
05-27-2009, 10:31 PM
Nice, dude. If rainbow says it takes 50 hours break-in time on their drivers, i'd tend to believe them - they designed them, they measure their TSP's - so they are going to be the ones who can tell me if the TSP's change during the first hours of play. They say they do.

If I sell cables and I tell you they'll sound better after 50hrs of play time because it allows time for the electrons to properly synchronize and lubricate for maximum electron flow, would you believe me because I designed the cable?

The 50 hours thing is a pretty good marketing/customer satisfaction ploy though. What happens over those 50 hours (that most people will just accumulate as they listen rather than let it play 50 hours straight)......you adjust to the speakers. Not satisfied right away? Great! Just wait 50 hours and you'll thoroughly enjoy them after you've adjusted to the speakers.....err, I mean, after the speakers "break in". ;) ;)



Furthermore, for the first few hours of play with 1 broken in sub and 1 brand new sub, it was quite noticeable - the speakers were not playing in sync... tight bass hits sounded like they were playing out of phase or something; like one woofer was delayed or playing slightly different frequencies. After 20-30 hours of play the subs blended together; now I can't hear a difference; it sounds like 1 sub.

The net performance of a completely "broken in" driver and a non-"broken in" driver will be virtually identical. Response curves/etc are well within audible tolerances for any compliance changes that would reasonably occur (change in compliance of +/- 10% or so). For one driver to have markedly different response in a given enclosure would require a MAJOR change in compliance, which simply does not occur over any short period of time under normal conditions (short meaning less than many years). Not something that would occur in 20-30 hours. This has been studied and measured. This isn't a matter of opinion.

FoxPro's example however seems reasonable given how temperature can audibly affect performance, and this effect seems much more pronounced in extremely cold temperatures.


Call it psychoacoustics if you want - that's the easy play, you get to claim that you simply know better than me and since I didn't MEASURE the difference on my new driver, I can't PROVE that there was a difference - therefore, there wasn't.

I have no doubt you could measure a difference with accurate enough equipment. The disagreement comes in to play when discussing 1) What time frame it takes for this difference to occur, and 2) how large of a difference it creates.

Our contention is that it 1) does not take anywhere near 50 hours (or 20-30) as suggested, and 2) that the differences are minute enough that they wouldn't be audible on normal, functioning drivers.


However, you can't prove there was not a difference either - you just think there wasn't, and the people who DO measure the drivers say that the parameters do change. Maybe they're lying - have you tested 2 rainbow woofers TSP's to see if they change from brand new vs. after 50 hours of play? Perhaps you can prove them wrong about their own speakers; can you link me to the tests?

Unless Rainbow sprinkles their spiders and surrounds with special "50hr break in required" pixie dust, there is no reason to presume they would perform or measure any differently than any other driver on the market under similar conditions. Which means it takes no where near 50 hours to break in the drivers, and that the differences will be minute (i.e. inaudible) .

00poop6x
05-29-2009, 02:06 AM
Most people try to avoid that as the tactile sensation gives away the location of the midbass driver.

I shave my legs and don't wear long pants to solve this problem. :D *sarcasm*

squeak9798
05-29-2009, 09:04 PM
I shave my legs and don't wear long pants to solve this problem. :D *sarcasm*

I hear pantyhose helps aswell.