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View Full Version : what kind of materials are ok to build an enclosure?



306stang
04-05-2009, 09:44 PM
might sound a little random but what are different types of materials that are acceptable to build a box with?

i know mdf is preferred and obviously fiberglass.

could you use Corian (solid surface countertop)?

reason i ask is that i work at a place that does countertops and i'm gonna get one of the guys to build me a little something using mdf. but . . . i wouldn't mind using something else to be different and get a different look.

squeak12
04-05-2009, 09:45 PM
What is the make up like? What wood would you compare it to? I personally would stay away from particle board and OSB.

Chin_Chilla
04-05-2009, 09:46 PM
Try it and let us know how it holds up!

306stang
04-05-2009, 10:01 PM
What is the make up like? What wood would you compare it to? I personally would stay away from particle board and OSB.

few specs:

A. Solid polymer components
1. Cast, nonporous, filled polymer, not coated, laminated or of composite construction with through body colors meeting ANSI Z124.3 or ANSI Z124.6, having minimum physical and performance properties specified.
2. Superficial damage to a depth of 0.010 inch (.25 mm) shall be repairable by sanding and/or polishing.



. Performance characteristics:

Property Typical Result Test
Tensile Strength 6,000 psi ASTM D 638
Tensile Modulus 1.5 x 10-6 psi ASTM D 638
Tensile Elongation 0.4% min. ASTM D 638
Flexural Strength 10,000 psi ASTM D 790
Flexural Modulus 1.2 x 10-6 psi ASTM D 790
Hardness >85 Rockwell “M”
Scale
ASTM D 785
56 Barcol Impressor
ASTM D 2583
Thermal Expansion 3.02 x 10-5 in./in./°C ASTM D 696
(1.80 x 10-5 in./in./°F)
Gloss (60° Gardner) 5–75 (matte—highly polished) ANSI Z124
Light Resistance (Xenon Arc) No effect NEMA LD 3-2000
Method 3.3
Wear and Cleanability Passes ANSI Z124.3 &
Z124.6
Stain Resistance: Sheets Passes ANSI Z124.3 &
Z124.6
Fungus and Bacteria Resistance Does not support microbial growth ASTM G21&G22
Boiling Water Resistance No visible change NEMA LD 3-2000
Method 3.5
High Temperature Resistance No change NEMA LD 3-2000
Method 3.6
Izod Impact 0.28 ft.-lbs./in. of notch ASTM D 256
(Notched Specimen) (Method A)
Ball Impact No fracture—1⁄2 lb. ball: NEMA LD 3-2000
Resistance: Sheets 1⁄4" slab—36" drop Method 3.8
1⁄2" slab—144" drop
Weatherability ∆E*94<5 in 1,000 hrs. ASTM G 155
Specific Gravity † 1.7
Water Absorption Long-term ASTM D 570
0.4% (3⁄4")
0.6% (1⁄2")
0.8% (1⁄4")
Toxicity 99 (solid colors) Pittsburgh Protocol
66 (patterned colors) Test (“LC50”Test)
Flammability All colors ASTM E 84,
(Class I and Class A) NFPA 255 &
UL 723
Flame Spread Index <25
Smoke Developed Index <25


† Approximate weight per square foot: 1⁄4" (6 mm) 2.2 lbs., 1⁄2" (12.3 mm) 4.4 lbs.

squeak12
04-05-2009, 10:06 PM
I don't really understand many of those specs? Is it a composite material? I would try it, if it is a cheap option, but my main concern would be at the joints if it is composite.

kmanian
04-05-2009, 10:07 PM
might sound a little random but what are different types of materials that are acceptable to build a box with?

i know mdf is preferred and obviously fiberglass.

could you use Corian (solid surface countertop)?

reason i ask is that i work at a place that does countertops and i'm gonna get one of the guys to build me a little something using mdf. but . . . i wouldn't mind using something else to be different and get a different look.

I have used solid serface material before, also Granite, believe it or not. and it works great. I have also used AZEK and once again it works great. obviously they all have differing techniques to achieve the final results. But if its stiff and you can work it you can use it. (there may be some sonic variances but nothing that can't be overcome easily)

306stang
04-05-2009, 10:40 PM
it's a composite material. i'll find out more specifically tomorrow.

Granite?? any pics??

kmanian
04-05-2009, 11:46 PM
it's a composite material. i'll find out more specifically tomorrow.

Granite?? any pics??

I will have to see if I can find them in the 1,000's of pics in this computer:crap: (I never put titles to the pics, I jsut down load them and let the computer do the rest. so it may take a bit. Anyways, it was for a HT install, infact I made 2 of them. Sealed, heavy as hell and to tell you the truth, they sounded freakin' awesome. porbably more to do with the tuning the acoustition did, but I like to think all the work that went into them was worth it;)

edzy
04-05-2009, 11:54 PM
How thick is it? 1/2"? Maybe make the box out of mdf and wrap it in that. it would be heavy as hell, but with little flex.

kmanian
04-06-2009, 12:01 AM
How thick is it? 1/2"? Maybe make the box out of mdf and wrap it in that. it would be heavy as hell, but with little flex.

I would think he would laminate 2 together, making staggered joints (which would be strong as hell) and no screws needed:D

fasfocus00
04-06-2009, 12:15 AM
for your enclosure material, it would have to be a material that is acoustically dead. outside of that it just has to be sealed really well. there are many other things as well but in a net shell.

maseyferguson05
04-06-2009, 12:50 AM
I don't really understand many of those specs? Is it a composite material? I would try it, if it is a cheap option, but my main concern would be at the joints if it is composite.
Its a plastic product bro. Its like 1000 bucks for a 10 x 4 sheet tho. You would probably not need to have two layers, just make a shitload of braces inside the box. Around the corners and stuff using scrap.
http://65.36.195.241/images/DBN/IMG_0012.JPG