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hornedfrog1985
03-23-2009, 01:27 PM
Ok, I'm trying to comprehend all this stuff now. I have a clarion dxz785usb deck. It has a 3 band parametric EQ. Within that setting it has the 3 q curves, and then a bunch of ranges inside those 3 q curves. Now, I read that you aren't supposed to mess with the EQ until it is absoulutely nescessary, and that you should try to take away from it, rather than add to the EQ. Does this mean try not to mess with the ranges at all, or don't increase the Q curve? I'm having a hard time understanding what else there would be to tune other than the ranges... For example I used to add some gain down low say ~35 hz, or something like that. I'm not supposed to do that at all then?

Sorry if this is hard to understand, because it's really **** hard to read this manual, and this CD player has got to be one of the most un-userfriendly decks I've had. Thanks.

djman37
03-23-2009, 01:39 PM
you have a freq range to peak at, the Q effects how wide the curve is, then there is gain/cut. if you look at a graphic EQ the only adjustment is boost/cut....width and freq are set.

hornedfrog1985
03-23-2009, 01:44 PM
So it adds a little more gain to the freq ranges within that curve if I widen it/add gain to it?

hornedfrog1985
03-23-2009, 02:26 PM
Man this is hard to understand. I get the +/- to the Freq ranges, but I'm trying to figure out what the Q curve is exactly. Is it just a representation of how you tuned the frequencies in that Q curve range? Then when you add db to it you are adding db to every freq in that range?

Lets say that the first band is 20-40-60-80-100Hz.... If you do a lot of +s will the curve be more narrow, or if you do a lot of -s the curve will be wide ?

hornedfrog1985
03-23-2009, 03:29 PM
I'll just post this for reference at this point. I still have more reading/searching to do, but it explained a lot. I'm not in my car so I'm not able to mess with it to get a better understanding right now... Thanks for the help.


First thing to understand is the different types of EQ's;

Parametric EQ: This is an equalizer where the level of boost/cut, center frequency and "Q" can all be adjusted by the user (you). Center frequency is the frequency (or "band") that you are adjusting. Q is basically the slope (or "width") of frequencies around the center frequency that are affected. When you boost/cut a frequency, you are not only boosting/cutting that specific frequency, you are also affecting a certain bandwidth of frequencies around that center frequency. The lower the Q, the wider the range of frequencies around the center frequency that are affected by the boost/cut (say, for example, if your center frequency is 500hz, all the frequencies between 250hz and 750hz may be affected). The higher the Q, the narrower the frequencies around the center frequency that are affected (again, with 500hz center frequency, only 400hz to 600hz may be affected). And the wider slope (lower Q), the more shallow the slope, so the surrounding frequencies will be affected more by the boost/cut than with the narrow (and steeper) slope, which is the higher Q. Sufficiently confused yet?

So, if you boost 500hz by 3db with a low Q (wide, shallow slope), 475hz and 525hz may be boosted aswell, but by only 2.75db. 450hz and 650hz may be boosted 2.5db. 400hz and 600hzmay be boosted by 2db. etc etc. But, with that same 500hz center frequency and 3db boost with a high Q (narrow, steep slope), 475hz and 525hz may be boosted by 2.25db. 450hz and 550hz may be boosted by only 1.75db. 400hz and 600hz may be boosted by .75db. Etc etc. This is all just for example to show you the differences......but it should make it easier to see how the Q affects the surrounding frequencies

Graphic EQ: Center frequency and Q are fixed, boost/cut is the only available adjustment. Pretty straight forward here.



Parametric EQ's generally have less bands because of their greater flexibility. They can be more helpful than graphic EQ's because they allow you to target specific problem areas with much greater accuracy. Graphics EQ's generally have more bands, but are less flexible and helpful if you want more broader control over basically the entire frequency spectrum.

djman37
03-23-2009, 04:23 PM
Man this is hard to understand. I get the +/- to the Freq ranges, but I'm trying to figure out what the Q curve is exactly. Is it just a representation of how you tuned the frequencies in that Q curve range? Then when you add db to it you are adding db to every freq in that range?

Lets say that the first band is 20-40-60-80-100Hz.... If you do a lot of +s will the curve be more narrow, or if you do a lot of -s the curve will be wide ?

say you pick 80hz as the freq, if you adjust the gain to +9 db with a very narrow bandwith(higher Q I think) you will affect a narrower bandwith...say 60-100 with a lower Q you would affect 30-130.
I could have high Q and low Q backwards but you get the idea. the RANGE(bandwith of frequencies) of bass is controlled by the Q.

hornedfrog1985
03-23-2009, 04:38 PM
Ok, say I did choose 80hz as my peak on band 1. Would I still be able to adjust say 60hz +/- at all? Hope that makes sense.

Once I get in my car I can play with it more, but I'm stuck at work for 12 hours a day the next 3 days.

I understand that 60hz would probably be in my Q unless it was incredibly narrow, but it can still be adjusted on it's own correct? Same with like 120hz etc, etc...

hornedfrog1985
03-23-2009, 04:51 PM
I just don't really get it if you can adjust all the other frequencies singularly, then why do you even need the Q/band feature? Just to simplify increasing all Freq in that range instead of going through all of them 1 by 1 increasing the + db?

djman37
03-23-2009, 05:18 PM
I just don't really get it if you can adjust all the other frequencies singularly, then why do you even need the Q/band feature? Just to simplify increasing all Freq in that range instead of going through all of them 1 by 1 increasing the + db?

the knob selects the freq center you want to use..not all of them. The gain is still a curve, the Q says how wide the curve is, the boost/cut says how much of that gain goes in or out.

you may want a wide, low boost in the bass around 125. you may need a tight cut of freq near 500 that's how to adjust the freq and Q.

hornedfrog1985
03-23-2009, 05:22 PM
If I turn the gain up too high it can clip the amp though right? I should be able to pick what frequency I want to be the curves peak too right? Mine says it's at 250hz for band 1, what if I want it at 200hz.

hornedfrog1985
03-23-2009, 06:05 PM
Ok, after some more reading I believe I understand what is going on pretty well. I just wish I had a few more bands to work with, but we'll see how much I really need to tune it when I'm all setup.

Thanks.

Steveopevo
03-23-2009, 10:28 PM
just picture a mountain top. At the very top is the center frequency that you've selected. Now the Q is the width of the slope downwards from there. Narrow Q = small peak with a sharp drop off and wide Q = fat peak with a gradual drop off.

djman37
03-24-2009, 07:08 AM
If I turn the gain up too high it can clip the amp though right? I should be able to pick what frequency I want to be the curves peak too right? Mine says it's at 250hz for band 1, what if I want it at 200hz.

a truly parametric EQ will have a knob that lets you 'dial' whatever freq you want. Some digital display versions have pre-set freq's to pick from..i think they use either 1/3 octave or 1/2 octave settings.
G/L man.