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uGotF-ckedUp
03-12-2009, 10:48 PM
just a thread to list tips for building boxes.


what do you guys use for glue?
and what do you use to seal your box? silicone?

lets see if we can get this a sticky =]

1rockford1
03-12-2009, 10:49 PM
not a bad idea

uGotF-ckedUp
03-12-2009, 11:00 PM
ya, i know how to build boxs and im not to bad at it, but i was just wonding what other people use, and get some advice from people that have been doing it longer than me

1rockford1
03-12-2009, 11:02 PM
cool.

302yota
03-12-2009, 11:07 PM
titebond II, seems to be the best glue for me.....i use whatever i can find to seal my boxes, silicone, liquidnails, caulk, titebond, etc.....

99grandprixGT
03-12-2009, 11:12 PM
ya be a good thread. i just started/about to finish my first box. main thing i need to do is measure my **** out again.i ****ed up my back piece. its like 2/16s to big and i did not figure it out untill i got the top and sides on. so now i need to, fix that before i put the top on, oh and cut the circle with a jig saw.

HeadCase
03-12-2009, 11:14 PM
2/16 = 1/8

Just thought i would point that out for absolutely no reason.

wasted ink
03-12-2009, 11:16 PM
1. Use Titebond for glue. Only difference in I, II, and III is the level of water resistance, which, in this case, shouldn't matter.
2. If using screws, ALWAYS predrill. Countersink recommended, but optional.
3. Use as many clamps as possible.
4. Use a speed square, combination square, framer's square, etc, to get your plates square.
5. When making cuts, remember to take blade thickness into account. Typically, it is 1/8" (.125").

Will add more later.

99grandprixGT
03-12-2009, 11:18 PM
2/16 = 1/8

Just thought i would point that out for absolutely no reason.

lol ya i could of reduced, but hey i was using the 16ths side of my ruler.

PaulThompson229
03-12-2009, 11:23 PM
Best tip I can give is if you have the room and cash invest in a tablesaw with a tilting blade, I hate trying to cut 45's with a skill saw lol.

Titebond II is what I always use for glue, Dap sillicone window caulk works good for sealant, resin is even better, use corse threaded screws not fine thread.

uGotF-ckedUp
03-12-2009, 11:41 PM
best tip i can give is measure twice cut once

schrummy
03-12-2009, 11:49 PM
buy clamps then more clamps and more clamps. seems like i always need more

Pioneer~Saturn
03-12-2009, 11:49 PM
Yep, you can never have enough clamps :)

SPY
03-12-2009, 11:51 PM
Router with jasper jig and spiral upcutting or double fluted straight cutting bits for sub and speaker terminal holes.

1-5/8" coarse thread drywall screws, 3/32" predrill bit with countersink

If painting the port tape off areas that will be bonded to other wood or carpet.

PaulThompson229
03-12-2009, 11:51 PM
buy clamps then more clamps and more clamps. seems like i always need more

Truth, I just got done building a 4.5' long box with 4 clamps:(

99grandprixGT
03-12-2009, 11:52 PM
Truth, I just got done building a 4.5' long box with 4 clamps:(

ya i could of used more as well, i only had 4 clamps. but i put the weights in the corner of my garage to good use.

Goldtaz1
03-13-2009, 12:35 PM
My advice is very simple. DO NOT USE THE PREDRILL and SCREW METHOD. Far too much time is wasted. Invest in a brad nailer that is capable of shooting brad nails up to 1 1/2" long and a fairly decent air compressor. It's always funny when people come over to my house and see the simple setup that helps me bring the wang. I have a craftsman compressor that cost $100 and a brad nailer from Harbor Freight that cost $35. I challenge anyone to say I'm wrong because in the end it's all about the glue that you use and the pressure applied to the joint.

schrummy
03-13-2009, 12:54 PM
take your time. slow down and breath. the slower you go the faster you will get done

AlpineUser
03-13-2009, 01:12 PM
i have been using liquid nails for glue...it works like a champ and if i dont have that i use whatever tightbond i have in my house

FASTIMES
03-13-2009, 01:18 PM
Router with jasper jig and spiral upcutting or double fluted straight cutting bits for sub and speaker terminal holes.

1-5/8" coarse thread drywall screws, 3/32" predrill bit with countersink

If painting the port tape off areas that will be bonded to other wood or carpet.

.....X2...I also recommend cutting ALL of your pieces first...then assemble.

BallinByNature
03-13-2009, 02:41 PM
.....X2...I also recommend cutting ALL of your pieces first...then assemble.

x2

psych0ticnemes1
03-13-2009, 02:44 PM
.....X2...I also recommend cutting ALL of your pieces first...then assemble.

Sometimes, if you're inexperienced, if you're off by a 1/8 or so by the end of the project it can be safe to wait to cut your last piece. More often than not a trim bit will take care of this problem though.

bjfish11
03-13-2009, 03:36 PM
My advice is very simple. DO NOT USE THE PREDRILL and SCREW METHOD. Far too much time is wasted. Invest in a brad nailer that is capable of shooting brad nails up to 1 1/2" long and a fairly decent air compressor. It's always funny when people come over to my house and see the simple setup that helps me bring the wang. I have a craftsman compressor that cost $100 and a brad nailer from Harbor Freight that cost $35. I challenge anyone to say I'm wrong because in the end it's all about the glue that you use and the pressure applied to the joint.

I agree with you on the part about glue being the strength of the joint. However, I have expressed my .02 on brad nails vs. scrwes before... and Ill stick with screws ;)

mr.michael
03-13-2009, 03:52 PM
2/16 = 1/8

Just thought i would point that out for absolutely no reason.

lol fo sho

DonH
03-13-2009, 06:46 PM
Router with jasper jig and spiral upcutting or double fluted straight cutting bits for sub and speaker terminal holes.

1-5/8" coarse thread drywall screws, 3/32" predrill bit with countersink

If painting the port tape off areas that will be bonded to other wood or carpet.

ALL A MUST! you dont need a router if money is tight. if you have a jigsaw you can get pretty handy with one. ive gotten pretty good freehand with my jigsaw skills.

thorshammer1
03-13-2009, 08:48 PM
My advice is very simple. DO NOT USE THE PREDRILL and SCREW METHOD. Far too much time is wasted. Invest in a brad nailer that is capable of shooting brad nails up to 1 1/2" long and a fairly decent air compressor. It's always funny when people come over to my house and see the simple setup that helps me bring the wang. I have a craftsman compressor that cost $100 and a brad nailer from Harbor Freight that cost $35. I challenge anyone to say I'm wrong because in the end it's all about the glue that you use and the pressure applied to the joint.


Agreed. I only learned about using a nailer to help recently. Also makes up for not having a lot of clamps. My current box has titebond II, brads and pre drilled screws.:laugh:

Also recently learned was taking a piece of wood and outline the edges to show you where to nail and screw. Very handy.:D

gotparts90
03-13-2009, 08:55 PM
My advice is very simple. DO NOT USE THE PREDRILL and SCREW METHOD. Far too much time is wasted. Invest in a brad nailer that is capable of shooting brad nails up to 1 1/2" long and a fairly decent air compressor. It's always funny when people come over to my house and see the simple setup that helps me bring the wang. I have a craftsman compressor that cost $100 and a brad nailer from Harbor Freight that cost $35. I challenge anyone to say I'm wrong because in the end it's all about the glue that you use and the pressure applied to the joint.

true on that brads = faster. I still like screws in birch those ends just don't glue as well as mdf. Mdf loves the titebond and really any good glue except liquid nails. I have been using a bunch on loctite 9887 grey RTV lately for sealing boxes I got for free from my friends trike shop. They got the wrong kind so I got 200+ tubes for free its worth 17 a tube. otherwise some ghetto sealant is fine but only MMM glue is good for carpet.

uGotF-ckedUp
03-13-2009, 11:23 PM
i always glue, clamp, use 1 1/2" staples instead of brads (they hold more) then screw it. haha strong as f*ck =]

Goldtaz1
03-14-2009, 08:53 PM
I agree with you on the part about glue being the strength of the joint. However, I have expressed my .02 on brad nails vs. scrwes before... and Ill stick with screws ;)

I would love to hear the enlighted explanation. I've never seen an accurate comparison before ;).

shizzzon
03-14-2009, 09:23 PM
When i assemble my box together, gotta have plenty of all sorts of clamps- clamps, L clamps, furniture clamps, they all come in handy.

I use Titebond II\III as the adhesive glue, then i use Liquid Nails as a bracer\sealer inside the box on all corners\adjacent pieces then I finish that off with silicone along the same areas as the Liquid nails.

A Good Tip-
If you get a lot of Liquid Nails on our fingers because you spread it with your finger, spread silicone with your finger too, :) silicone mixed with LN will get it off your fingers in no time.

Also, if building a smaller box, i use 6" L brackets every 12in on all 6 sides of box if necessary to maintain strong structure where 2 pieces meet. The 6" L brackets have a 10-12" structural strength radius before it looses effectiveness.

If building a large box, bracing with 3\4" All-thread with 1\8" Steel runs from point to point will give outstanding bracing strength. Finish the All-Thread off by welding ALL cross sections inside the box. I always glue the steel as well to make sure that all areas between point A and point B are connected with the steel.

bjfish11
03-16-2009, 12:13 PM
I would love to hear the enlighted explanation. I've never seen an accurate comparison before ;).

Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, so Im not trying to persuade anyone to do it "my way," just talking from my experience...

We all know, a good joint is key to a solid box. Tight joint=good joint. Whats going to make the joint tighther? A fastener being driven into panels where the force applied is the same direction in each panel (i.e. a nail)? Or a fastener in which the panels are being "pulled" together by the force (screws)?

Try this on some scrap pieces. Glue and brad nail a joint together. Wipe off all the glue that squeezes out. Then on the SAME joint, go back and add some screws. I bet you will get more glue to squeeze out. ;)

Goldtaz1
03-16-2009, 05:47 PM
Everyone is entitled to their own opinion, so Im not trying to persuade anyone to do it "my way," just talking from my experience...

We all know, a good joint is key to a solid box. Tight joint=good joint. Whats going to make the joint tighther? A fastener being driven into panels where the force applied is the same direction in each panel (i.e. a nail)? Or a fastener in which the panels are being "pulled" together by the force (screws)?

Try this on some scrap pieces. Glue and brad nail a joint together. Wipe off all the glue that squeezes out. Then on the SAME joint, go back and add some screws. I bet you will get more glue to squeeze out. ;)

Well said good sir.

9BlackN*Black6
03-17-2009, 01:55 AM
The six p's of life.... prior planning prevents **** poor performance....
I used titebond II, and GE SiliconeII window and door (black) to seal it. Do all the wood work before sealing, last thing you want is sawdust coating your silicone. Round all the corners on the box, I don't have alot of box building experience, but i do know rounding the corners helped alot with the carpeting. I was a little **** with my box, I sanded every joint to ruff up the MFD and dried glue to give the silicone something to grab. Then wipe it down with a damp clothe like 3 times....when you think its clean, clean it again, when you think its perfect, clean it again. In the port area i ran my finger along the silicone to kinda pack it in the crack and it gives it a cleaner look, especially if you are rounding your port. I only used black silicone because I painted the inside all black.
3M super 77 spray adhesive.... carpet- I got mine at home depot, really thick stuff. I'd buy 2 cans. Use brand new razor blades when cutting carpet for the cleanest look. When I was done with mine I put it outside for like an hour to let all the paint/silicone vapors out, I'd let everything cure for at least 24 b4 you put your sub in. As everyone else pointed out...Take your time. I put probably 20 hours into my box, and I still gotta do the custom stuff. Your box will reflect the time you sink into it. I wouldnt argue screws vs. nails since your glue is what really holds the box together.....or is it the carpet??? Just kidding! just make sure your cuts are perfectly straight and youll be good. Dont skimp on the glue either you will have plenty, just wipe off the extra b4 it dries... Ummmm O yea if you are doing this in your garage, do the woodcutting outside, I built mine mainly at night on the weekends in my garage, now i have to go thru with a leaf blower and blow all the sawdust out, I didnt use the 6 p's there! good luck

bjfish11
03-17-2009, 12:05 PM
Well said good sir.


I do what I can, haha.

Enellz
03-17-2009, 12:09 PM
OP, you should quote, or copy, and post them in the first post. But good idea. I had 'the art of box building thread' but never got around to actually cleaning it up.