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jshak07
02-28-2009, 12:01 PM
I just picked up some 6.75" alpine type r components and a sax125.2. Now the comps are rated 70 rms so how will they handle 125 watts?

bigbangtheory
02-28-2009, 12:04 PM
Type R's don't like over recommended wattage too much. Wouldn't run anymore than 100rms and that is really pushing it. Others might chime in to what they run though, but seen them blow off 80rms to each side with little time on them. Friend is a ******* though.

Never really cared for the type R componet set to tell ya the truth. Nice amp though.

jshak07
02-28-2009, 12:08 PM
dam well that *****. Got a hell of a deal on the comps! Might just put them in the classifieds and get somethin else

dbeez
02-28-2009, 12:12 PM
well i hade the type r 6x8's and loved them fed them 75 rms and handled it like a champ just be smart with the gains and you will be golden and they will sound pretty awesome..Especially compared to what you have now...

Louisiana_CRX
02-28-2009, 12:15 PM
keep the gains down...and set the amp properly

eharri3
02-28-2009, 12:31 PM
There was more to it than mismatched rms ratings for someone to blow 70 watt components with an 80 watt amp. Like maybe that person does not know wtf they're doing. Whatever the amp's rms rating is, it will only see it for a few brief seconds in the song if the gain is set properly. The rest of the time it's putting out considerably less as the song changes in pitch and volume. You can connect a 70 watt speaker to an 80 watt amp but if it's set up right that 80 wattts comes once in a blue moon, the rest of the time its much less. If OTOH you send a speaker every bit of its RMS rating and then you clip it alot it's bound to go over its thermal limits and fry in short order. This often happens when people buy into that crap and focus way too much on matching numbers. And then they wonder why they're feeding a speaker every bit of its rms rating but no more and it's still not loud enough in normal listening so they fix it with 'gain overlap', basically a crutch for people not running enough power.

RMS power relationships do not blow speakers, and there is really no such thing as a speaker that only 'likes' to be connected to an amp that produces less than it's rms power rating. This is a myth perpetuated by people who don't know how to control an amp's power delivery and be nice to their equipment while getting the most out of it. It is designed as a general rule of thumb to prevent people who don't know anything from blowing up one speaker set after another because they have more power than they know what to do with.

The idiot at the controls blows speakers. PERIOD. Just make sure to set the gain so that the speaker is not likely to spend a considerable amount of time during a song at it or above its rms rating. I personally wouldn't hesitate to give a 70 watt speaker every bit of that 125 watts but Id also be conservative with the gain and use an unattenuated tone with no gain overlap.

RMS ratings are arrvived at using continuous tones. In normal music speakers never receive any specific amount of power for more than a brief instant. You can connect a speaker to an amp that is rated to put out 25% or 200% of that speaker's rms rating and if you know what you're doing you'll never have a problem. Keep the power clean. Set your gain text book style and listen carefully and if you hear anything not sounding right back off.

dragnix
02-28-2009, 12:34 PM
i say sell it and get better comps. I've never heard type R comps, but if they sound anything like their subwoofer counterpart then...

qkassidyw
02-28-2009, 01:56 PM
In my experience the Type-R comps can handle 100 RMS just fine, they don't put out too much midbass (but if you dampen your doors well then it shouldnt be an issue). Make sure to lower the tweet to about -5dB on the crossover.

They are decent comps, just ovepriced.

jshak07
03-01-2009, 02:58 PM
the amp does 125x2 at 4 ohms and speaker is rated 70 rms

cbrei1023
03-02-2009, 09:49 AM
I have the newer version of the Type Rs (rated at 110RMS) They can take more but I need change the HPF for it. At 110W i hvae the HPF at 50hz and they are good. anything more I need to change it to 80-100hz.

Hope it helps

dafobbishon3
03-02-2009, 10:05 AM
There was more to it than mismatched rms ratings for someone to blow 70 watt components with an 80 watt amp. Like maybe that person does not know wtf they're doing. Whatever the amp's rms rating is, it will only see it for a few brief seconds in the song if the gain is set properly. The rest of the time it's putting out considerably less as the song changes in pitch and volume. You can connect a 70 watt speaker to an 80 watt amp but if it's set up right that 80 wattts comes once in a blue moon, the rest of the time its much less. If OTOH you send a speaker every bit of its RMS rating and then you clip it alot it's bound to go over its thermal limits and fry in short order. This often happens when people buy into that crap and focus way too much on matching numbers. And then they wonder why they're feeding a speaker every bit of its rms rating but no more and it's still not loud enough in normal listening so they fix it with 'gain overlap', basically a crutch for people not running enough power.

RMS power relationships do not blow speakers, and there is really no such thing as a speaker that only 'likes' to be connected to an amp that produces less than it's rms power rating. This is a myth perpetuated by people who don't know how to control an amp's power delivery and be nice to their equipment while getting the most out of it. It is designed as a general rule of thumb to prevent people who don't know anything from blowing up one speaker set after another because they have more power than they know what to do with.

The idiot at the controls blows speakers. PERIOD. Just make sure to set the gain so that the speaker is not likely to spend a considerable amount of time during a song at it or above its rms rating. I personally wouldn't hesitate to give a 70 watt speaker every bit of that 125 watts but Id also be conservative with the gain and use an unattenuated tone with no gain overlap.

RMS ratings are arrvived at using continuous tones. In normal music speakers never receive any specific amount of power for more than a brief instant. You can connect a speaker to an amp that is rated to put out 25% or 200% of that speaker's rms rating and if you know what you're doing you'll never have a problem. Keep the power clean. Set your gain text book style and listen carefully and if you hear anything not sounding right back off.

definitely words of wisdom right there.