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Gauntlet
08-24-2003, 10:47 AM
Well people, after many trials and tribulations, I have finally constructed my first set of kick panels. Before I began this project, I was a complete newbie; I had never tried to fiberglass once in my life. But during the process I learned a lot of things, and I figured I'd share them with the forum. Hopefully this tutorial can help some people who are in the same boat I used to be in. So without any further ado, here goes nothin'

These are the materials you will need; you can get just about everything at Home Depot:
- A gallon of fiberglass resin
- A coupe extra tubes of hardener
- 2 or 3 packages of fiberglass mat
- A big box of disposable gloves
- Lots and lots of cheap brushes (use bristle brushes, not foam)
- A dropcloth, painters tarp, or garbage bags
- A Dremel with a fiberglass cutting bit (#542)
- Painter's tape
- Fleece
- Spray adhesive/liquid nails/epoxy/hot glue gun
- Wood dowels
- Sandpaper
- Body filler
- A mold release agent (WD-40, vaseline, a non-stick cooking spray, astroglide, petroleum jelly, etc)
- Carpet or vinyl or paint and primer
- Coarse thread drywall screws

First things first - before we do any work on the kicks, run all your wires and clear the area out. If you're mounting the crossovers in the trunk and need to run 2 sets of wires per kick, be sure to put some tape on both ends of one wire so you don't get them confused. Once you get the area cleared, it's time to begin taping it off with painters or masking tape; be sure to use the widest tape you can find. It's a good thing to be generous here; go at least a few inches bigger than you plan on making the actual panel. Make sure the tape is flush with the actual base, as the tape will form the shape of your mold. To avoid any resin leaking through and onto your carpet, use two layers of tape, criss-crossing the layers. If you have a newer car and want to be absolutely positive nothing gets on the interior, put some aluminum foil between the two layers of tape. Once resin gets on your interior, it is not coming off.

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/taped_off-med.jpg

Now hold your baffle(s) up to where the panel is going to be, and draw a rough outline of the size of the panel. The only purpose this will serve is so you know where to lay the mat, so you aren't stuck with an extra foot of fiberglass and wasted mat/resin. When laying the mat down, remember to go about an inch or two past this line, to ensure that the panel will have uniform thickness. Then, apply a mold release agent onto the tape to aide in removing the mold from it later on.

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/outline_baffle-med.jpg

Now comes the tricky part.....the actual fiberglassing. I'm going to do my best in trying to explain it.

First and foremost, get your workstation set up properly. An organized workspace will ensure a faster worktime, less headaches, and it will help you get into a seamless routine. This is what mine looks like:

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/supplies_outside-med.jpg

^ On the outside of the car, I have a good amount of dixie cups pre-filled halfway with resin (2 oz), a big box of disposable gloves, a few tubes of hardener, and some brushes.

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/supplies_inside-med.jpg

^ On the inside, I have a plastic tarp covering up the area that is not taped off, and I have a package of fiberglass mat cut up into pieces that are roughly five inches square.

Now, onto the fiberglassing! First, put on some gloves; believe me, you will need them. Mix up a batch of resin/hardener, following the manufacturers ratio. Before doing anything, brush a light coat of the mixture onto the tape itself. Take a piece of the mat and stick it onto one of the corners, remembering to go at least an inch over your line. With just your hands, try to smooth it out so you can (hopefully) avoid air bubbles. Dip the tip of your brush into the mixture, and poke it onto and through the mat, working from one edge to the other. Continue with this process until the entire piece is flush with the base and is transparent. Grab another piece, stick it next to the previous one, making sure to overlap a little bit, and repeat. Continue like this until you've worked your way around the entire panel.

Once you get used to the process, you'll be able to get into a routine (which is why an organized workspace is vital). This is how mine went:

1) Grab a dixie cup halfway full with resin.
2) Mix in the proper amount of hardener.
3) Put on gloves and grab a brush.
4) Start putting the mat on until the mixture is gone.
5) Throw the brush and gloves away and grab new ones.
6) Mix up another batch of resin/hardener.
7) Continue fiberglassing.

Now after doing this on three separate occasions, I have learned a few secrets, so read these and (hopefully) you won't make the mistakes I did.

1) Work in small batches. Don't mix up six ounces of resin/hardener, because chances are the working time of the mixture will be over before you're even halfway through with the batch. I found it easiest to work in two ounce batches, which is exactly one half of a dixie cup. But if you're only comfortable working with an ounce at a time, then by all means go for it. There's no need to sacrifice the quality for the sake of time.

2) Take your time. This is fiberglass, not Nascar, so there's no need to rush anything. Work very slowly, making sure the mat is laid down perfectly flush with the base. If you see an air bubble, squish it out by squeezing the bristles of the brush into it and outwards to the edge. Air bubbles are not good for fiberglass.

3) Don't use gobs and gobs of resin. Dip the tip of your brush lightly into your mixture, and work just enough of it into the mat so it becomes transparent. If you load the brush up with the resin/hardener and slop it onto the mat haphazardly, it will just drip down and create little "resin bubbles."

4) Don't use a painting stroke when applying the resin/hardener to the mat. As aforementioned, dip just the tip of your brush into the mixture, and sort of poke/jab it into the mat so it penetrates through.

5) And last, but not least, contruct a small "test subject" first. Just work on fiberglassing a few pieces so you can get used to the process and try to get yourself into a routine. Don't just go right at the project unprepared. The more comfortable you are with the process, the faster and better the final product will turn out.

Once you get this all done, it should look something like this:

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/layer_fresh-med.jpg

Let this mold cure for at least 3 or 4 hours, I let mine cure over-night just to be on the safe side.

Gauntlet
08-24-2003, 10:49 AM
Now rip the mold out of your car and get all the tape off the back; it should fit like a glove. If it doesn't, then you made a mistake and it's time to start over. But if you didn't, then you can move on to trimming the panel. Hold your baffle up to the panel, and draw an outline of what you want to trim off.

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/draw_outline-med.jpg

Now take your dremel and insert the fiberglass cutting bit (number 542), then simply cut around the edges. Make sure to wear some form of safety glasses, as there will be powder flying all over the place. When you get it all trimmed off, put in the sanding bit, and sand the edges down so they're nice and smooth.

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/trimmed-med.jpg

It's now time to mount the baffle onto the base using dowels. For an adhesive, you can use hot glue, liquid nails, epoxy, etc. I prefer liquid nails because it's very thick, and thus fills in the gaps easily. Before doing anything in this stage, drill a hole in the panel for your wires to run through.

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/holes_drilled-med.jpg

Now I've read about people spending weeks and weeks to get the absolutely perfect imaging, but I personally don't think it's THAT important. Just don't mount them anywhere you please for the sake of getting it done. Steve (ss3079) taught me a nice trick to get good imaging - use a laser pointer. Line the pointer up with roughly the middle of the baffle (or tape it on), and move the panel around until it points to the center of your headrest. Hold it in place with one hand, and use the other to measure the distance from the bottom of the baffle to the base. Cut a dowel to this length and glue it on so you no longer have to hold the baffle in place. Put the panel back in to make sure everything lines up. If the laser still points to your headrest, you're golden, but if it points to the window or something, you'll have to re-do it. Now, picture a triangle that goes around the edges of the baffle, and measure the distances at each corner, and cut some dowels to their respective lengths, and glue them on. Let this sit until the baffle is secured nice and tight.

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/baffle_mount-med.jpg

Now we can move on to streching the fleece over the kick. Once again, you can use hot glue/liquid nails, but I found it easier to use spray adhesive, 3M #90 to be exact. The key with this process is to make the fleece as tight/taut as possible. The more time you spend getting this correct, the less time you'll have to spend layering/sanding body filler. First, cut out a square of fleece, making sure it's big enough to strech over the entire kick with about an inch of excess material. Then put some adhesive over the entire baffle. Stretch out the middle of the fleece so it's nice and tight, and carefully stick it on to the baffle. Make sure to retain the tautness while laying it down, and remember to get it as smooth as possible. Let this sit for the manufacturers recommended drying time. Afterwards, lay your kick upside down so the base is facing upwards. Put some adhesive on the underside of the base, about one inch in depth and two inches across. Pull the fleece in this corrensponding area as taut as possible, and sort of hover it over the adhesive. Look to make sure that there are no big "pits" in the fleece and that everything looks tight and smooth. When you've confirmed this, lay it down on the adhesive and smooth it out. Repeat this process all the way around the entire panel. When you're done, simply trim off the excess material and you're good to go.

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/covered-med.jpg

Now it's time to fiberglass the fleece - this part is easy. Simply mix up a nice sized batch of resin/hardener, and slop it onto the fleece. There are a things thing you have to remember here:

1) Make sure you use enough of the mixture so that it penetrates all the way through the fleece. Basically, just keep on putting the mixture on until the fleece no longer soaks it up. I used about 30/35 oz per kick, which is roughly a half-gallon total.
2) Don't put the mixture too far over the part of the fleece where your baffle holes are. You're going to trim this part off at the end.
3) Once again, work in small areas. If you try to work your way around the entire kick at once, the mixture will begin to harden before you can put enough resin on for the fleece be thoroughly saturated.

Once you finish, let the kicks cure for about forty-five minutes.

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/fleeced-med.jpg

Now lightly sand the hardened fleece and fiberglass a layer of mat all the way around, following the aforementioned steps. Let this cure for at least an hour or two, then give it a light sand.

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/fleeced_fiber-med.jpg

Now get your dremel, and cut/sand out the fleece around the baffle holes. I used the cutting bit to get as close to the edge as possible, and used the sanding bit to get it flush.

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/hardened-med.jpg

Gauntlet
08-24-2003, 10:50 AM
Now it's time for the most godawfully tedious part of this project - body filler.

First things first - the key to applying body filler is to remove as much as possible/smooth it out as much as possible while it's soft. Once it hardens, the only thing you'll be able to use is elbow grease.

Now, if you're like me and you didn't have the tools to make perfect circles on your baffles, don't fear, there is hope. Simply lay your grill base down in the baffle, then cut out some poster board and wrap it around the grill, making sure to put some mold release on the outer edges. Then, just fill in all the gaps with body filler; let it cure, take everything out, sand it down, and voila, you'll have a perfect circle.

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/perfect-med.jpg

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/perfect2-med.jpg

Now, onto making the entire kick smooth. There are two options here; you can either just put body filler where you need it (i.e. pits and uneven spots), or you can put a layer around the entire kick. The first way will be easier and require less work, but the second way will make the kick uniformly smooth. There's really no better option, as long as it's done correctly. Now how fine and smooth you sand everything depends on what you plan to cover the kick in. If you're using paint/vinyl, it's going to have to be as perfect as humanly possible; every tiny little imperfection will show through and look five times worse when covered. If you're using carpet, you have some margin for error, so it only needs to be relatively smooth. If you're unsure about whether it's smooth enough or not - keep on sanding.

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/sanded-med.jpg

Now flip the kick over.

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/edges_on-med.jpg

Put the sanding bit in your dremel, and sand off all the excess fleece/fiberglass so it becomes flush with your base. Then give the edges a quick sand to make them smooth.

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/edges_off-med.jpg

Now onto covering them....I chose carpet, as it provides a larger margin for error, and looks best with my interior. The process is basically the same as applying the fleece, but your adhesive has to be used all the way around. Hot glue/fabric glue/spray adhesive will do the job, but I found spray adhesive to be the easiest. If you've never covered any odd shapes in fabric, it will frustrate you early on, and you might want to practice it without using any adhesive to get the hang of it. Here are a few tips I learned in the process:

1) As you did with the fleece earlier, start by adhering the carpet to the top of the panel. You'll have more problems if you try to start from the bottom or side.

2) Again, work in small areas, but not too small. Consider each "area" about 1/5 of the entire panel, giving you 5 different areas. You shouldn't need to work in areas much smaller than this, unless your kick has some really odd bends and curves in it.

3) Find the spot on your panel that is hidden from your vision the most (spot A); then make an imaginary line directly across the panel and start here. Work your way evenly around each side, until they meet at spot A. This will give you a little room for error, so any mistakes you may come across, you can "hide" in an area that won't be seen.

4) Lastly...I'll do my best to explain this in words....as you work your way around the panel, try to pull the material back towards you, cutting little notches in the carpet along the base so it won't overlap. If you do this enough, you wont have to make a finish seam on the panel and it will look better. Sorry I can't explain it any better.....if you play around with the carpet for a little bit, you should be able to get the hang of it.

This is what the almost finished product will look like:

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/full-med.jpg

The underside of the panel:

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/backside-med.jpg

And the final kick panel with the holes cut out:

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/done-med.jpg

Now place the kicks into your car. Grab your drill, put in a bit that is slightly smaller than the shaft of your drywall screws, and drill a few pilot holes. Screw the drywall screws in until the head begins to bite into the fiberglass. Use as many screws as is needed. Then simply do all your wiring, mount the speakers, and bump away.

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/in1-med.jpg

http://www.caraudio.com/gallery/4/9/3/9/in2-med.jpg

Good luck!

maylar
08-24-2003, 11:36 AM
This one went into my saved html files folder man. Great job.

One question: it looks like you have a foot pedal type parking brake like I do - will the brake lever clear the kicks? I don't think mine would, and I haven't found a conversion setup to make the parking brake a hand lever.

Gauntlet
08-24-2003, 11:51 AM
Yeah, that's the E brake, and it just barely clears the kick. If you're worried about yours, you could just put the pedal all the way down, and make the fiberglass there sort of in the shape of a tear drop so it fits underneath the lever...

nswartley
08-24-2003, 12:50 PM
awesome job and great explanation...but we can't see the last 2 pics :)

-nate

bumpin_blazer
08-24-2003, 01:27 PM
none of the pics show up for me:(. dang man i wanna see these pics and read this novel lol but no book is good without pics.

adam

er1kkull
08-24-2003, 04:54 PM
i cant see the pictures . :confused:

Gauntlet
08-24-2003, 06:15 PM
Pictures should work now...

Trixter
08-27-2003, 11:08 AM
Awsome explaination and job...looks great. (Almost makes me want to get rid of my q-forms and make some.)

bumpin_blazer
08-27-2003, 03:55 PM
very nicely done. i like trixter almost want to ditch my q-logic kicks and make some of my own. bah i'll just make my q-logic's look custom hehe:D.

adam

LuNaTiC
08-30-2003, 10:04 PM
id rather just buy em' and not take the chance. but great job and thx for the info

Gauntlet
08-30-2003, 10:13 PM
id rather just buy em' and not take the chance. but great job and thx for the info

What chance would you be taking?

ss3079
08-30-2003, 10:15 PM
id rather just buy em' and not take the chance. but great job and thx for the info

Why spend $120-$150+ when you can do them yourself for a lot less? It's a fun and fairly easy 2-5 day project ... :)

- Steve

hotown
09-10-2003, 07:49 PM
and the more stuff you do with fiberglass, the better you get. you can make anything with fiberglass, and it looks good. if you screw up you can always sand or carpet.

Bumpin03
09-18-2003, 08:40 PM
can you give an estimate of how much this costs for materials?

Gauntlet
09-18-2003, 08:53 PM
I'll try and recall the prices off the top of my head...you'll have to go to Home Depot to get an exact figure

- A gallon of fiberglass resin - around $20 per gallon
- A coupe extra tubes of hardener - $1-2 per tube
- 2 or 3 packages of fiberglass mat - $5 a package
- A big box of disposable gloves - $8 bucks
- Lots and lots of cheap brushes (use bristle brushes, not foam) - 99 cents a brush
- A dropcloth, painters tarp, or garbage bags - I had some lying around
- A Dremel with a fiberglass cutting bit (#542) - $50 for the dremel, $10 for the bit
- Painter's tape - around $3 bucks
- Fleece - $5 a square yard
- Spray adhesive/liquid nails/epoxy/hot glue gun - spray adhesive (3M 90) - $12, liquid nails - $4
- Wood dowels - $2
- Sandpaper - $3
- Body filler - I used some I already had....I think quarts are like $7, and gallons are $20
- A mold release agent (WD-40, vaseline, a non-stick cooking spray, astroglide, petroleum jelly, etc) - I used some Pam I had
- Carpet or vinyl or paint and primer - carpet was $7 per square yard I think
- Coarse thread drywall screws - $2

Def Jukie
10-20-2003, 04:18 PM
dude. slug is amazing. i im a standing 4 year atmosphere fan. anything rhymesayers/defjux is all im about. i even got the new RSE phoenex logo tattooed on my shoulder.

EzekialPhoenix
12-16-2003, 01:50 PM
I have never done any fiberglass work myself, but am very interested. My newbie *** is wondering how you secure the kickpanels to the floor? Or do you just let them sit there? Probably a stoopid question, but I have always wondered that.

Gauntlet
12-16-2003, 04:06 PM
^ Read the last paragraph of the tutorial, I screwed them in using drywall screws.

eaglemn05
12-29-2003, 12:39 AM
two questions...
1 how much room for error does this give you?
2 can you plastic coat it, or make it look like a plastic coat?

JeffG
01-01-2004, 04:42 PM
What could i put in the kick panels to help the sound quality? I was thinkin of lining the inside with sound deadening then stuffing them with fibre fill. Any comments or suggestions on that?

ss3079
01-01-2004, 04:57 PM
What could i put in the kick panels to help the sound quality? I was thinkin of lining the inside with sound deadening then stuffing them with fibre fill. Any comments or suggestions on that?

I believe that is recommended.

Stuff with polyfill, and use some sound deadening material on the inside.

- Steve

Gauntlet
01-01-2004, 07:00 PM
I added some polyfill and sound deadening a few months ago to my kicks....I don't notice any audible difference.

*shrugs*

smullen
01-01-2004, 07:27 PM
Great Job Gauntlet thanks for sharing...

I'm thinking this should be a sticky...

I know I'm gonna be looking at it again for refrences...

ditto985
01-01-2004, 07:44 PM
just one small hint, while fleece is a quick way to build up matterial, if it gets warm, the fiberglass breaks real easy, in the long run it is better to use fiberglass mat or cloth and be sure that it is durible.

Gauntlet
01-01-2004, 08:08 PM
Smullen - It is sticky. ;)

Ditto - What are you talking about?

ditto985
01-01-2004, 08:22 PM
If you don't believe me then believe this- Quoted from Car Audio and Electronics Magazine. October 2003 issue pg 97-98 "Thick matterials will build up quickly, but they also have the tendency to warp and crack easily"

Gauntlet
01-01-2004, 08:29 PM
I never said I didn't believe you.....I said I had no idea what you were talking about/why you even brought it up.

smullen
01-01-2004, 08:29 PM
What kinda heat does it take to crack, like engine heat or summer sun or what???

I read that same isue to and it kinda threw me cause I love and respect Car Audio MAG, but I have seen hundreds of people using stuff stretchable material as thick as Flecce and thin as regular t-shirt material and never eard anyone complain about shrinkage or crackage...

I'm always looking for tips to help me learn and get better at glassing, so what would be a better solutiion. We need some type of fabric that is really stretchy to be able to stetch it over stuff and get the cool shapes...

ditto985
01-01-2004, 08:34 PM
Grill cloth is a good matterial that is stretchy. As for the amount of heat for it to crack, it does take more like summer heat to do the damage.

Gauntlet
01-01-2004, 08:39 PM
Cracking occurs in heat above the temperature that the resin manufacturer recommends....to compensate just use a little less hardener and you shouldn't have any problems. Or actually follow the directions. ;)

As far as what cloth to use....it's not that big of a deal. Something that streches farily easily and can soak up resin will do the job. If you think it's too thin, you can always reinforce it with a couple of layers of mat.

bumpin_blazer
01-02-2004, 01:41 AM
Cracking occurs in heat above the temperature that the resin manufacturer recommends....to compensate just use a little less hardener and you shouldn't have any problems. Or actually follow the directions. ;)

As far as what cloth to use....it's not that big of a deal. Something that streches farily easily and can soak up resin will do the job. If you think it's too thin, you can always reinforce it with a couple of layers of mat.

exactly if you follow directions it will be fine. i used fleece for my kicks and you'll be hard pressed to find much warmer summer's than August in central Tx. 2 yrs and not 1 crack so take it with a grain of salt. personally i feel car audio and electronics is 90% or more biased b/c they get paid for their spots by certain companies.

adam

smullen
01-02-2004, 01:45 AM
exactly if you follow directions it will be fine. i used fleece for my kicks and you'll be hard pressed to find much warmer summer's than August in central Tx. 2 yrs and not 1 crack so take it with a grain of salt. personally i feel car audio and electronics is 90% or more biased b/c they get paid for their spots by certain companies.

adam
I would pretty much agree with ya on your opinion of car audio when it comes to reviewing product... But this was an article and there was no actuall products that I rember for them to push...

I wish I could find that issue and read it again...

ditto985
01-02-2004, 02:11 AM
That article had nothing to do with products at all, it was a demo for building your own fiberglass dash. As for finding that article try www.caraudiomag.com/contactus/ and contact back issues. The magazine name is Car Audio and Electronics, the issue date is October 2003, Volume 16 Number 10

sumone
01-04-2004, 08:59 PM
How good do they stand up to the weather? Like the heat vents by your foot, and also, since winters' pretty much here [in chicago, this sunday], wouldn't your wet rain/snow feet damage them? Me, or the driver, would be careful about the kicks when getting in the car and driving, but when you have joe schmoe get in on the passenger side and kick them whilst getting in with his steel-toe boots after walking in 2 foot of snow....makes me wonder??

ss3079
01-04-2004, 11:13 PM
Put snow and water into your bathtub ... how does it hold up ? :) (well, some have an inside lining, but the outside is sprayed with fiberglass ... water won't hurt the fiberglass itself)

A little common sense goes a long way when you get into the vehicle. You should be able to make them pretty much "up and out of the way" kind of deal. Just warn your passengers to watch where the hell they put their feet ;)

You can make them as strong as you want to ... for kick panels, some just resin the fleece and call it a day. But, you can make them strong enough to park your car on if you wish.

- Steve

bumpin_blazer
01-04-2004, 11:19 PM
as i said my car has never had any problems. i've had my kick panels in the car for 2 years not 1 crack, nick, dent, break etc. i agree with steve i tell anyone who gets into my car, " think i'm insane or not you kick my kick panel hard enough to damage anything you better believe you are paying to fix it." so far that's worked pretty well except when my dink self hit the dustcap on my vifa mids and dented it:(. oh i also forgot to mention this in my post, i put my kick panel on concrete to dry so that's probably i'd guess 120-150 degree's if the air is at 100. so i'd guess temp won't do much aside from putting your kick panel under say a blow torch:D.

adam

Matt_83
03-03-2004, 09:26 PM
Ya dude, that looks really good. I've got an idea for some kick panels for my truck, and this really helped me out in figuring out the steps. I think i'll work on them in the summer once i got a little more time...

sumone
03-05-2004, 03:54 PM
Finally convinced myself to try...so...

What steps can I leave out??? I wanna spend as less time as possible and as less money as possible, but not at the sacrifice of doing a poor job.

I'm gonna be parked on a one way street for doing the left kick, let it dry(or is it harden); then the next day, park on the other side and do the right kick.

My plan is to put a some hd-62efs in em, and I do want good imaging.

sumone
03-05-2004, 04:00 PM
also I don't know what a dremel is and when I looked it up, it's a company...so what product am I exaclty looking for???

Gauntlet
03-05-2004, 04:59 PM
You're looking for a basic rotary tool, like this:

http://www.dremel.com/productdisplay/display.asp?sku=1003009005

I got a basic one at Home Depot for around 40 bucks, and the fiberglass cutting bit for $10.

As far as what steps to leave out....they're pretty much all very important to the final product....

checo
03-26-2004, 09:16 PM
Nice job!!!!!!!!!!!

thanks for share, it is helping me a lot.

S. Moreno

Hondaluv
03-31-2004, 04:32 AM
This should nearly go without saying but there was one small point missed in this thread. I see he mentioned wearing safety glasses when sanding fiberglass... quite true, I recommend them anytime working with mat, dry or cured. trust me, the first time you bend fiberglass mat, look into the air around it... you'll see little shimmering "hairs" and they float alot. Which also leads me to my point. A RESPERATOR is HIGHLY recommended, during mat handling, coating, and sanding. I found my reserator, made for fiberglass made a HUGE difference in the fumes, fiberglass hairs, and sanding particles... Try fiberglassing without one and you'll have a sore throat after I guarantee it. Latez!

ss3079
03-31-2004, 06:52 PM
Try fiberglassing without one and you'll have a sore throat after I guarantee it.

Just did a pair of kicks. I'm still alive and kicking. No mask ;)

Though I HIGHLY suggest that you wear one.

- Steve

Gauntlet
04-01-2004, 02:17 AM
Meh....masks are highly over-rated. The fumes keep me going.

djfusion
04-25-2004, 04:54 PM
I like your description. But i missed one important detail. How did u actually secure the kick panels to the car? Brackets, screws, bolts? Whats common for this?

ss3079
04-25-2004, 05:02 PM
I like your description. But i missed one important detail. How did u actually secure the kick panels to the car? Brackets, screws, bolts? Whats common for this?

He screwed them in.

Screws work well ... just make sure you know what and where you're screwing into.

Velcro has worked for me in the past.

Some of the last few sets sit in place on their own and don't move around at all ... depends on the design.

- Steve

mjf2620
05-18-2004, 10:46 PM
:wave: check out the custom kicks Gauntlet created for me (http://www.caraudio.com/vb/showthread.php?t=59300)

lawyer
05-28-2004, 11:15 AM
Hey I got the same CDT's,CL-61's?. But I have NO clue on how to mount the grills!

They dont seem to line up with the drivers. How did you mount your grills to your drivers?

Thanks!

sumone
05-28-2004, 12:55 PM
^ I have the same inquiry. It's like the grilles are diametrically (that a word?) larger than the drivers.

ss3079
05-28-2004, 07:53 PM
I had that happen as well.

I just re-drilled my holes.

They weren't off by much, so maybe you can get away with making them a bit larger.

Get three screws in there and re-drill the last hole if you want.

Hopefully that's what you guys mean by "not lining up". After that the mesh/grille part just pops right on.

- Steve

MikeofTulsa
08-07-2004, 12:37 AM
well gauntlet......im glad to see student become the teacher......great job ......

LBX2G
08-07-2004, 01:17 AM
than man for explaining this in detail . THere are still some fuzzy spots. But i will read it a few more times. I really thank ur for the detail cus i thought with the mold u just slap fiberglass on ther base for like 3-4 layers then lay the mat down.

kanucktruk
08-08-2004, 04:15 AM
I must admit that I thought fiberglassing would be a lot tougher than it is...but your experience has made my life a lot easier...thank you for sharing your fiberbuild. I have build 4 sets of kickpods now for different cars and now I'm building my center console for my truck and it's gonna be sweet...I'll post pics when I'm done.
Thank again Bro!

sumone
08-08-2004, 07:27 AM
^ oh brother, another canadian... ;)

ss3079
08-08-2004, 01:20 PM
Best thing that ever happened ;)

- Steve

Hooter
08-20-2004, 01:34 AM
and another Hoser to post :D I just did a set of kicks in a 65 Impala, man they looked good, I took the plastic kick panels out and built the pods right onto the panels, I gotta get some pics up, I havent had any problems other then abuse with using fleece, but what type of glue do you guys use for glueing down the vinyl because I have been having problems with the 3m glue releasing when it gets hot, I ordered some new glue from select Products that is supposed to be good for high heat, but it is kind of expensive,

jellyfish420
08-28-2004, 01:20 AM
im getting ready to do some kicks for my car but i cant screw the driver side down. the fuse panel is right in the way. i was gonna build the kick over it anyway and just make it removable. how would i solidly mount it(idrive to fast for it to not be solid) but still have it removable?

Acidburn
08-28-2004, 05:42 AM
industrial strength velcro?

Gauntlet
08-29-2004, 01:05 AM
im getting ready to do some kicks for my car but i cant screw the driver side down. the fuse panel is right in the way. i was gonna build the kick over it anyway and just make it removable. how would i solidly mount it(idrive to fast for it to not be solid) but still have it removable?

Put some painters tape down on the mounting surface, then adhere the kick onto the tape (spray adhesive, gorilla glue, epoxy, etc.) Should stay on pretty tight, and will be removable.

justinpaslay05
09-18-2004, 12:57 PM
hay i think that is a great way to tell peole how have not done that befor i am not exatly a newbie but i cloudn't have pulled that off that good so props to you.

breezes
10-06-2004, 01:52 PM
great job, can you help me design a sub box to fit in place of the upper part of the back seat of a 99 F-150 XTD CAB, I AM GOING TO PUT 2 JL AUDIO 12W6V2 SUBS IN THIS BOX

Gauntlet
10-06-2004, 05:10 PM
No, I cant.

vosschs
11-10-2004, 01:10 AM
can you use any type of fleece or mat or whatever or does it have to be the fiberglass mat

vosschs
11-10-2004, 04:18 PM
anyone?

Nitropyro666
11-14-2004, 06:23 PM
not 100% sure what you mean but to make a shape use fleece or ne material then as your strenght you use fiberglass mat/cloth with resin. hope that helps
Danny

vosschs
11-14-2004, 06:42 PM
i was wondering if i could use any type of material, could i jsut take a old t-shirt and use that as the part to stretch over the pod ,?

Acidburn
11-14-2004, 06:57 PM
yes, you can use a shirt but a fleece type material will be much stronger

jellyfish420
11-14-2004, 07:09 PM
the thinner the material, the less resin it will hold, and will not be as strong. i used a shirt, but it was a fleece-y type shirt.

sumone
11-15-2004, 01:07 AM
can you help me design a sub box to fit in place of the upper part of the back seat of a 99 F-150 XTD CAB, I AM GOING TO PUT 2 JL AUDIO 12W6V2 SUBS IN THIS BOX
....

No, I cant.

lol.......

LBX2G
11-15-2004, 01:46 AM
^^^^^^^ pricelessss.........

Gauntlet
11-15-2004, 01:19 PM
i was wondering if i could use any type of material, could i jsut take a old t-shirt and use that as the part to stretch over the pod ,?

You can use a shirt, you'll just have to use a few more layers of mat/cloth over the top of it to give it some stability.

sammy1
11-19-2004, 11:29 AM
this is awesome Gaulent!! I plan on fiberglassing in the veyr near future and this will help me out tremoundsly!!! :wowflash:

pj_chevy03
12-18-2004, 05:18 PM
i have never had any experience (or even a chance to hear speakers in kickpanels) so i have a few questions.

Wouldn't your legs seem to "block" the sound from the speaker in the left kick panel. It just seems like your leg would be in the way.

Considering that a kickpael is an enclosure, would it give you better midbass response, like around 80 hz or so?

Would the left kick panel have to be pointed up more toward the drivers seat than the righ one?

Can the difference in air volume of the 2 kicks give a different sound from the speakers?

thanks for any help... :thumbsup:

Basshead808
01-17-2005, 03:05 PM
this is awesome Gaulent!! I plan on fiberglassing in the veyr near future and this will help me out tremoundsly!!! :wowflash:

x2 very nice :thumbupw:

graffix989
02-08-2005, 09:24 PM
u might wanna tell people to wear a resporator when sanding or cutting... that powder u see is very very bad jew jew if it gets in ur lungs.. im not sure exactly what it does to ur lungs, but it basicaly tears the **** out of em. i mean its fiberglass... i used to work for a boat company, so ive done alot of fiberglassing myself, mostly on the newer jet boats. ive never done it for speakers before, i was wondering what the fleece was for? sound deadener? oh an cudos on the guide, i saved it an might just try that someday..

ss3079
02-08-2005, 09:27 PM
ive never done it for speakers before, i was wondering what the fleece was for?

It ultimately forms the overall shape. You lay fiberglass over it for added strength.

You better fiberglass your entire vehicle ... since you probably can get the materials a little cheaper than the rest of us ;)

- Steve

graffix989
02-08-2005, 09:30 PM
lol ya i made a hood for my 626, it looked ****** till i rolled it in a drunken stupid episode... an its a whole lot easier to fiber glass with a gun an 20 gallon tanks then wit brushes :P

Ti22
03-15-2005, 05:37 AM
Yeah the resin fumes cause nerve damage, and the fiberglass can cause serious damage to the lungs. I would use a respirator or at least a particle mask. On another note this post was very good. I just found this forum and I plan on doing a kick panel and could not really find a good tutorial, great job Gauntlet. And I really like your idea about putting the grill mounts in the baffle and using poster board for bondoing, great idea.

Gauntlet
03-25-2005, 02:59 AM
Good luck. :thumbsup:

GCAdidas13
04-21-2005, 01:18 PM
Fiberglassed Sails for Tweeters (http://www.caraudio.com/vb/showthread.php?t=91856)

Insomniac119
04-21-2005, 11:41 PM
neato.

Starky
05-10-2005, 08:21 PM
i have never had any experience (or even a chance to hear speakers in kickpanels) so i have a few questions.

Wouldn't your legs seem to "block" the sound from the speaker in the left kick panel. It just seems like your leg would be in the way.

Considering that a kickpael is an enclosure, would it give you better midbass response, like around 80 hz or so?

Would the left kick panel have to be pointed up more toward the drivers seat than the righ one?

Can the difference in air volume of the 2 kicks give a different sound from the speakers?

thanks for any help... :thumbsup:


Good questions

MetalMaxima
05-10-2005, 08:56 PM
Just a few things that I would like to add in my current fiberglassing experience...

(1) DREMEL. DO NOT FIBERGLASS WITHOUT IT. I would also recommend getting some carbide cutting bits - they are strong as steel and incredibly smooth cutters.

(2) Meguiars MOLD RELEASE WAX as a mold release agent. works **** well.

jacko
05-18-2005, 11:51 PM
i have never had any experience (or even a chance to hear speakers in kickpanels) so i have a few questions.

Wouldn't your legs seem to "block" the sound from the speaker in the left kick panel. It just seems like your leg would be in the way.

Considering that a kickpael is an enclosure, would it give you better midbass response, like around 80 hz or so?

Would the left kick panel have to be pointed up more toward the drivers seat than the righ one?

Can the difference in air volume of the 2 kicks give a different sound from the speakers?

thanks for any help... :thumbsup:

i was wondering this myself

sirloin
05-26-2005, 05:11 PM
hey what tool can i use for the making of the wood piece? can i use the dremel..or do i need some sort of wood cutter?

GCAdidas13
05-26-2005, 06:01 PM
A router is the best, a jigsaw could work if you have a steady hand

BeanII
06-10-2005, 05:55 PM
:rolleyes: at adidas.......


dude builds one set of tweeter pods and a pair of kicks and becomes the glass expert


pshhhffffffffffffff




























just kiddin dude.

req
06-10-2005, 06:33 PM
:rolleyes: at adidas.......


dude builds one set of tweeter pods and a pair of kicks and becomes the glass expert


pshhhffffffffffffff


just kiddin dude.


lol, its because i talked to him about it for like 2 weeks straight until he knew every step by memory :)

cmon bean, you know you love me :crazy:

GCAdidas13
06-10-2005, 09:34 PM
and that's TWO sets of kicks, mr. Bean.....! i did my koda pods too :D and it's HELLA easy.

BeanII
06-11-2005, 11:16 AM
I would really like to get togethe with adidas and req and do a big *** car audio project. I would really like to share with you guys what I've learned over the years about custom car fabrication and also learn from you req what you know. It's too bad you don't live closer cause neither of us have jobs right now and it would work out great.... hahaha

GCAdidas13
06-11-2005, 01:02 PM
well me and req are getting together at his place in liverpool, NY here on the 22nd of this month...

plane ticket?

:D

there will be a thread for what me and req do :)

packerfan
07-06-2005, 02:10 PM
well me and req are getting together at his place in liverpool, NY here on the 22nd of this month...

plane ticket?

:D

there will be a thread for what me and req do :)

Pervs.......

twoloudforyou
01-18-2006, 02:51 AM
Is glue the only thing that holds the wooden dowels in place? or do u fiberglass the base of them so they dont come apart?

Also do u fiberglass the inside of the pods as well or just the outside?

GCAdidas13
01-18-2006, 11:06 AM
Just glue is enough. It only has to hold the piece of wood that you are fiberglassing over. After you are finished fiberglassing the outside, it is common practice to remove the wooden dowels (i use popsicle sticks) and spread out a layer of just resin on the inside. It will hole everything like it should

Crzy
06-01-2006, 09:26 PM
roughly how much resin and mat will i need to do a set of kicks? a gallon of resin? a qt?

Insomniac119
07-14-2006, 07:17 PM
Why is this stickied? Those are hidious kick panels, very poor quality...ok so they're not that bad but the carpet around them look awful.

Rule el numbre uno - don't use carpet or vinel when your flush mounting them. :D (unless you know what you're doing.

EDIT: that was a little harsh, but I was drunk when I posted that.

Insomniac119
07-14-2006, 07:20 PM
roughly how much resin and mat will i need to do a set of kicks? a gallon of resin? a qt?

You might be able to get by with a quart, if they're small kickpanels, but just buy a gallen.

I just picked up a gallon for 30. Not too shabby when one quart if half that cost.

reneeb7363
08-29-2006, 09:20 PM
I agree.. and yet I disagree.. LOL! The fiberglass work, for a newbie, was informative and appears to have been done methodically step by step appropriately and with MUCH patience...This obviously makes for an AWESOME fb job! The only issue I have is the carpeting and the finish around the speaker cut-outs. I have not fiberglassed..YET... but I have covered many a box, seat, couch, etc. The only suggestion/improvement to this, that would take you to the next level, is if were to cross cut your "openings" and roll the material into the opening; so the cloth would have appeared to continue and not have shown those ragged ugly edges. You did a great job installing the ring symmetrically and it was a shame to see the carpeting of the pod done half assed.
Great job on the rest of the work tho! Every one of these fb posts I read encourages me and builds a little more confidence. My first project is going to be a wheel well box for two 12" subs. Look for a post soon!

Cotlod
09-24-2006, 11:15 PM
roughly how much resin and mat will i need to do a set of kicks? a gallon of resin? a qt?

IMHO... a quart per pannel is sufficient. Unless youre putting 8's in your kp, you dont need alot of layers. I personaly use said amount for 6.5s with 3 layers of matte (either felt or 60 stitch cotton). Its proven to me that it works.

Gauntlet
10-05-2006, 10:50 PM
Why is this stickied? Those are hidious kick panels, very poor quality...ok so they're not that bad but the carpet around them look awful.


It's called a newbie guide, dickweed. They were made by me for the first time to encourage people to try it for themselves. Die, slow.

GCAdidas13
10-06-2006, 02:34 PM
It's called a newbie guide, dickweed. They were made by me for the first time to encourage people to try it for themselves. Die, slow.

Plus he made this thread over three years ago.

Quit fronting.

alexacura1
01-21-2007, 03:10 AM
i have wounderd how 2 use fiberglass

KyleHarty
02-26-2007, 02:52 AM
i have never had any experience (or even a chance to hear speakers in kickpanels) so i have a few questions.

Wouldn't your legs seem to "block" the sound from the speaker in the left kick panel. It just seems like your leg would be in the way.

Considering that a kickpael is an enclosure, would it give you better midbass response, like around 80 hz or so?

Would the left kick panel have to be pointed up more toward the drivers seat than the righ one?

Can the difference in air volume of the 2 kicks give a different sound from the speakers?

thanks for any help... :thumbsup:

Nice detailed walk-through. :D

I thought I'd add some thoughts on these questions, I hope it helps!

Your legs can block the sound a little, I can hear a slight difference with a passenger blocking the right side if I really listen for it; but I don't think there's a good way around that, door speakers will do the same thing.

Some speakers may have better midbass response in an enclosed kick like that; but many (including the couple sets I've done) have much better midbass when you cut a good sized chunk out of the back to better simulate an infinite baffle setup. The size of the kicks can make a difference there too, they will frequently be too small to get a good response. You could check with the manufacturer and see what they recommend for that particular speaker. I've always played around with them after they are finished, try them sealed and if you are not satisfied try cutting a chunk of the back out. My current set started with a 3" diameter whole in the back and I ended up cutting out most of the back to get the best midbass response out of this set.

The left one would frequently be aimed up more like you said, but it depends on how you want to set things up. I personally tried to optimize mine for my own listening, so they were both aimed with my ears in mind and therefore aimed like that; but this causes the imaging to be a little off for the passenger. If you aimed them more evenly, it wouldn't be a good for you but better for the passenger.

I doubt there'd be much of a difference for the two sides unless you had to build one side much differently for some fit reason, in which case you may want to attempt to compensate. If you end up with a more IB type setup like I detailed above, you won't have to worry about it.

h17250x
04-25-2007, 12:50 PM
I think you have got it figured out man. The only thing that i do differently is using speaker grill cloth instead of fleece because it is cheap and works really good because it is so easy to stretch over curves and angles.

robspeed2002
05-25-2007, 04:35 PM
inspiring! thanx!

miker
12-09-2007, 11:13 PM
Is their a reason the pics don't work anymore? I think they would help me understand this a bit more...

miker
12-10-2007, 09:48 PM
ah... No way for me to see the pics? Anyone?

snoopysnooper
02-14-2008, 11:49 AM
yeah, pics wont come up for me either..
****, i was gonna use this for door panels..

HLEP?!

J.J.
03-04-2008, 10:14 AM
***** when pics don't work!

old49er
03-31-2008, 07:05 PM
need to reup those pics

diehappy
04-23-2008, 12:57 PM
Yo, Anyone have a link to a Custom Kick panel thread that is actually working and people can see the process and what to do?......

yne721
04-27-2008, 05:26 PM
oh great. i was just going to start doing my first set this weekend coming up, but now there are no pictures to help me :(

Gauntlet
05-25-2008, 04:44 PM
The pics are still in my gallery, the link structure seems to have changed which is why they don't show up. I can't edit my posts either to update the links. *shrug*

Kind of funny looking at this thread five years later (has it seriously been that long?). Lots of things I would do differently now.

PV Audio
05-25-2008, 05:55 PM
Holy ****, you're still alive? :omg:

Gauntlet
05-25-2008, 09:56 PM
I'm surprised as well.

DaGh0st
05-27-2008, 01:57 AM
host on photobucket and just link us to the album?

i would love to give this a try.

req
05-27-2008, 02:07 AM
I'm surprised as well.

nice to see you round.


ill fix your links for ya. gimme a few minutes.


btw gauntlet, would you mind if i added in little pointers in where i can add some tips on what you did in this thread to help guys, as this is one of the most widely viewed glassing tutorial i have come across, and there are tons of small bits that i could comment on. you can also PM me or discuss with me here what you would like to change. either way it would be a benefit to the forum.

anyway,
links are fixed man. :)

DaGh0st
05-27-2008, 02:39 AM
:woot:

Gauntlet
05-27-2008, 02:41 AM
What do you want to add?

Some things I'd add off the top of my head:

- Spend more time with the baffles. I just threw mine together because I wasn't entirely sure what I was doing, and the kick panels looked really out of place to me as a result. They didn't blend in with the interior as well as they could have. I also f-ed up with the tweeter depth. *headdesk*

- Carpeting should have overlapped into the baffle, creating a more snug fit and you wouldn't see any of the filler (which looks like garbage). I also didn't need to sand nearly as much as I did for carpeting, and I would have had to do far more work if it were going to be painted. If I was going to get them painted, I would seriously consider just doing a rough job and handing them over to a professional. Sanding is torture.

- Buy carpeting/vinyl/whatever locally and check to see how the colors match first. I just bought some blue carpet from selectproducts...not a wise decision.

- Use a jig when making the baffle. My idea for getting a perfect circle, while somewhat creative, is more or less stupid and a waste of time. I also should have taken a router to the edges of the baffle to make a more smooth transition.

- Use lag bolts, not drywall screws.

- Just rip the fiberglass with your hands, don't cut it.

- Lightweight body filler is your friend.

I'm sure there's more, but those are the ones that immediately jump out at me.

IDSkoT
10-18-2008, 11:40 PM
Great write-up, man... and not saying I could do any better, but the carpet isn't really cut evenly where the speakers are. I'd suggest at least spray painting around it so it's black.
I'll definitely print this out when I go to do mine. :D

Gauntlet
10-19-2008, 06:47 PM
Yes. Read the post directly above yours.

Chaos16
11-10-2008, 12:41 AM
This explanation seems simple enough to follow, but does anybody know where i can find some Q-logic ones or some other prefab ones that will fit my 2007 chrysler sebring. I want to modify them from there using this git-up so that it looks as factory as possible...

kopimon
03-19-2009, 09:10 AM
Does it make sense to put a layer of Dynamat on the inside of the kickpanel? Or, for that matter, on the inside of a fiberglass sub enclosure?

I'd like to make a pair of fiberglass enclosures for a 10" sub this spring. I'll have a layer of Dynamat covering my entire trunk, so would I need to put any in the enclosure?

atvrdr
08-13-2009, 12:09 PM
how much does this roughly cost for 2 kickers

nissanrider06
07-10-2010, 08:22 PM
How many layers of fiberglass for the base and for the top? That should be included for sure!!!!!

audio-pro714
08-30-2010, 12:23 PM
Honestly good explanation but your execution and final product need work? Imaging is very crucial,atleast make your pods match left and right ? It appears from the photo's they aren't even mounted at the same position<so the angles can't be anywhere near the same? I've been doing fiberglass work since 1995 and for a first try not bad but i would of made it a little more factory looking and mirror image them! I'm only trying to give a little helpful criticism.

gckless
08-28-2011, 05:04 AM
Very nice tutorial, especially for your first. I haven't read through all 9 pages but I would add to overlap the carpeting into the baffle cutout and color match the carpet. But nice job overall!