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View Full Version : should I seal off the holes in my door panels



Steveopevo
01-30-2009, 11:48 PM
there are several holes in the sheet metal of my door panel and I know it's gotta be hurting the midbass response. Is it safe to plug up the holes or do they need to stay open to bleed off moisture or something? I don't have the $$ to buy dynamat right now but was thinking of expanding foam or some other cheap way.

jdawg
01-30-2009, 11:52 PM
if you spray expanding foam in there you are ****ed lol. One time i used like 1/8 paneling and cut out all the shapes and siliconed the peices over the holes so I could pry it back off if I had to

Steveopevo
01-31-2009, 12:02 AM
if you spray expanding foam in there you are ****ed lol. One time i used like 1/8 paneling and cut out all the shapes and siliconed the peices over the holes so I could pry it back off if I had to

thanx for saving me from disaster. :eek:

jdawg
01-31-2009, 12:05 AM
there are moving parts inside your doors, if you spray foam in there they wont move anymore, but sealing up the holes helps mid bass alot

Steveopevo
01-31-2009, 12:15 AM
there are moving parts inside your doors, if you spray foam in there they wont move anymore, but sealing up the holes helps mid bass alot

I understand what you're saying. I wasn't thinking of filling the panel up with foam but rather a dab of foam around the opening of the hole but it probably wouldn't stay in place long enough to dry. that would be some funny ***** if someone did fill up there panel and they couldn't roll down their window.

headless
01-31-2009, 10:39 AM
you don't have to use dynamat to seal them...even sealing them with MDF boards will help alot, from what I have heard and what I understand...you want to separate the rear of the speaker from the listening compartment as much as possible.

I've got mine sealed with MDF that is then covered with dynamat. It helped alot. I never tried with just mdf without dynamat, tho...

gqjeff
01-31-2009, 10:44 AM
Buy this and put as many layers as you can get out of it on your doors. It will work decent. Its not dynomat but its def better then nothing at all.

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/10-sqft-R-BLOX-Audio-Sound-Deadener-Dynamat-Sample_W0QQcmdZViewItemQQ_trkparmsZ72Q3a1205Q7c66Q 3a2Q7c65Q3a12Q7c39Q3a1Q7c240Q3a1318Q7c301Q3a0Q7c29 3Q3a1Q7c294Q3a50QQ_trksidZp3286Q2ec0Q2em14QQhashZi tem270336578567QQitemZ270336578567QQptZMotorsQ5fCa rQ5fTruckQ5fPartsQ5fAccessories

JimJ
01-31-2009, 10:52 AM
I wouldn't bother sealing them up unless you already have the outer door skins deadened. It'll be a pain to remove them when it comes time to deaden the outer door...

groundpound4200
01-31-2009, 11:44 AM
i use sheet metal, pop rivets, and silicone. Just make sure there is nothing you want to do inside the door before you close it up like JimJ said.
http://i47.photobucket.com/albums/f159/hooperm/DSC01291.jpg

nineball
01-31-2009, 12:15 PM
on my car it was impossible to seal up the entire door skin due to moving parts. first i put as much of a layer as i could on the outside inner skin.

http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a357/nineballots/000_3716.jpg



then i coated the inside inner in a layer



http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a357/nineballots/000_3718.jpg




then i went back to cover up as many of the holes as i could. i thought about using mdf but my door trim panel actually sticks out into the door itself on the big opening on the bottom. i ended up buying a roll of roof flashing (thin metal) and used self taping screws to hold it to the door. then i covered that with another layer of dynomat. this pic doesn't really show it but i had to go back with a wooden mallet and bang the form into the flashing / dynomat pieces so the trim panel would go back on.


http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a357/nineballots/100_0001.jpg

http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a357/nineballots/100_0002.jpg

Steveopevo
01-31-2009, 11:05 PM
Nice photos, I appreciate the ideas. Is it necessary to use sheet metal or mdf or can I use aluminum tape? I heard it's really strong and durable.

Corey69
01-31-2009, 11:08 PM
I just used cascade vb2 on my doors and doubled it up on the other side where the lock rails were so it wouldn't stick to them.

http://photos-e.ak.fbcdn.net/photos-ak-snc1/v1752/117/118/736091717/n736091717_2308388_8292.jpg

Jumbo Jet
02-02-2009, 10:43 PM
I did my entire outer door with Dynamat.

http://i55.photobucket.com/albums/g150/Jennybeth1/Random/dynamatfrontdoors3.jpg

Then I covered the entire inner door with another layer.

http://i55.photobucket.com/albums/g150/Jennybeth1/Random/dynamatfrontdoors4.jpg

After that I gave both the outer and inner layer a coat of Ensolite.

http://i55.photobucket.com/albums/g150/Jennybeth1/Random/ensolitepassdoor1.jpg


The rest of the interior got the same treatment. I would say do as much deadening as you can afford.... the more the better. Do it in phases if you have to, that helps ease the pain a little.

I didnt cover the holes in my doors with MDF, maybe I should have but its sealed up pretty good between the Dynamat and Ensolite.

bigbangtheory
02-03-2009, 01:11 AM
Wait............so you just deadened over the door holes with deadener and no backing like sheet metal or MDF?

IDSkoT
02-03-2009, 01:13 AM
I wouldn't bother sealing them up unless you already have the outer door skins deadened. It'll be a pain to remove them when it comes time to deaden the outer door...

I've seen people use heavy cardboard, like the "for sale" signs. They tape them together then tape them over the holes, and put deadener over it. It's not as sturdy as say, metal, but it does the trick, I hear.

headless
02-03-2009, 08:50 AM
I've seen the covering just spread over the holes before...it works ok even without a backing, but not as well as with a wooden backing for the deadener to actually stick to.

ramos
02-03-2009, 09:41 AM
I use acrylic plastic most of the time. Custom shaped to the doors :)