PDA

View Full Version : No limits (Enclosure)



SubNit
11-28-2008, 02:49 AM
Say that you were working with a material that could be formed into any shape needed. What would be the optimal shape for a ported enclosure? As in instead of the traditional rectangular box, what is the optimum shape (if any) for an enclosure? Say a circle for example (i.e. cylinder)

Been doing some searching around and haven't turned anything up on the matter so thought I would ask. I know it sounds kind of stupid to ask, but I can't help but think that changing the shape of the enclosure would have some profound effect on the response of the driver inside it.

Thanks in advanced for any input:)

jbizzle
11-28-2008, 02:51 AM
Fiberglass?

Fusion_FREAK
11-28-2008, 02:51 AM
I don't think it would make much difference. Just make it to how much airspace and tuning you want.

SubNit
11-28-2008, 02:53 AM
Fiberglass?

No.

Although it would probably be chaper than what I may end up doing

kmanian
11-28-2008, 02:56 AM
actually an orb, or half circle is tech. best, it reflects the back waves in the most possible directions, besides directly at the sub.

Fusion_FREAK
11-28-2008, 02:56 AM
If it's not fiberglass, what is it?

Is it a composite material? (fiber glass, carbon fiber, kevlar, etc...)

SubNit
11-28-2008, 03:00 AM
actually an orb, or half circle is tech. best, it reflects the back waves in the most possible directions, besides directly at the sub.

Thanks!

I'll definatley look into that.

SubNit
11-28-2008, 03:06 AM
If it's not fiberglass, what is it?

Is it a composite material? (fiber glass, carbon fiber, kevlar, etc...)

May end up having some .708" Acrylic. Depending on the complexity of the enclosure I should be able to get the whole thing formed as 1 piece, reguardless of shape.

kovemaster559
11-28-2008, 03:10 AM
shouldnt make a diff in sound just as long as the tunning is correct and it matches up with box building program.(CUFT)

IDSkoT
11-28-2008, 03:15 AM
I don't think it would make much difference. Just make it to how much airspace and tuning you want.

The actual shape of the enclosure really doesn't matter... As long as it's sturdy. You could use a tack-looking enclosure and it'd work just as well... as long as it's built and tuned properly, it really doesn't matter.

But, technically, a satellite-like design would be the most effective/efficient. But odds are, in the small space of a car, it wouldn't matter.

Rashaddd
11-28-2008, 04:55 AM
Doesn't really matter in terms of sub boxes. The only real risk of standing waves is if your box has a length as long as a wave that it will be playing, which since most sub boxes are playing very long wavelengths in relatively small boxes, you almost never will run into an issue.

Plus, either way, there are many more things in your car you'd be better off trying to address than making sure the box is absolutely perfect and flawlessly designed

SubNit
11-28-2008, 12:17 PM
Doesn't really matter in terms of sub boxes. The only real risk of standing waves is if your box has a length as long as a wave that it will be playing, which since most sub boxes are playing very long wavelengths in relatively small boxes, you almost never will run into an issue.

Plus, either way, there are many more things in your car you'd be better off trying to address than making sure the box is absolutely perfect and flawlessly designed

I'm not one to simply take suggestion's blindly so this helped a great deal. Thanks for taking the time to explain this to me. This was more or less something that I was tooling around with and wanted to know if there was an optimum enclosure for a subwoofer.

Thanks for all the input guys and if I have any more question's I'll be sure to bother you again;)