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View Full Version : how could i make my crappy box look smooth and shiny?



d audio 450
07-04-2003, 11:57 PM
what if i covered it in bondo or something? ive never even seen the stuff, but im told it dries and you can make it real smooth and all, then paint it.....my box is ugly as poop, and i didnt leave any lips to carpet it...so im finding an alternative way to make it look alright...
any suggestions appreciated
-pat

paikiah
07-05-2003, 12:01 AM
fiberglass man...:)

Primetime
07-05-2003, 12:17 AM
Originally posted by paikiah
fiberglass man...:)


If you can sand it to at least a semi flat shape. there is some really cool paint out there that after doing the 3 step process will make your box look like a rock.. Granite or something like that..

mgaidica
07-05-2003, 12:54 AM
bondo would work.. not sure fiberglass would be necisary...

BDIDDY
07-05-2003, 12:58 AM
resin that bad boy up and then sand it, bondo it, then sand that, then finally shoot it up.

ramos
07-05-2003, 04:21 AM
How bad are we talking ? If it's just plain wood. I would just use some high build polyester primer to fill in the imperfections. Then sand it smooth and shoot a couple coats of finishing primer and sealer and paint.
If it's worst than that. Then I would use thin coats of body filler and sand everything smooth. No need for glassing. THere really is no need for the resin either. The body filler will stick to the wood just fine on it's own. :)

BDIDDY
07-05-2003, 01:42 PM
Originally posted by ramos
How bad are we talking ? If it's just plain wood. I would just use some high build polyester primer to fill in the imperfections. Then sand it smooth and shoot a couple coats of finishing primer and sealer and paint.
If it's worst than that. Then I would use thin coats of body filler and sand everything smooth. No need for glassing. THere really is no need for the resin either. The body filler will stick to the wood just fine on it's own. :)



would you need to sand the wood first though?

mgaidica
07-05-2003, 02:13 PM
u should sand the wood a little, then wipe it off with a damp towel, just so its clean and the bondo wont have trouble sticking.

paikiah
07-05-2003, 02:15 PM
Then again, if the surface was jagged, that would mean more surface area, and more surface ara= more places to hold onto. Well, that's my theory anyway.

BDIDDY
07-05-2003, 06:11 PM
You would need to use rougher grit too. Because if it is as smooth as a baby's butt then it wont stick.

ramos
07-08-2003, 09:21 AM
Originally posted by BDIDDY
would you need to sand the wood first though?

Depends on the wood. I don't usually. Body filler will stick to d@mn near anything and everything. :)

Mercureie
07-08-2003, 08:16 PM
im doin almost this exact same thing to my box that is drying in the garage now. hopefully it turns out good and i can post some pics. how many coast of body filler should i use, sanding between each one? and where can i pick some of this up?

BDIDDY
07-08-2003, 09:01 PM
Originally posted by Mercureie
im doin almost this exact same thing to my box that is drying in the garage now. hopefully it turns out good and i can post some pics. how many coast of body filler should i use, sanding between each one? and where can i pick some of this up?


I would use a straight edge and apply it pretty thick. Then sand it down to where everything is flat. You dont need "coats" because as I understand this stuff is not supposed to be used alot or very thick, it will crack.

Mercureie
07-09-2003, 12:49 AM
I would use a straight edge and apply it pretty thick. Then sand it down to where everything is flat. You dont need "coats" because as I understand this stuff is not supposed to be used alot or very thick, it will crack.

ah, see, learn somthin new everyday

BDIDDY
07-09-2003, 01:02 AM
Originally posted by Mercureie
ah, see, learn somthin new everyday

well glad to help. Ask around some more though because I am not the smartest person on this forum.

ramos
07-09-2003, 08:03 AM
Yep use it sparingly. If you build it up to thick it will crack on you. Try and spread as thin as you possibbly can and still fill in the cracks ,crevices ,and holes. Sand between progressivly using finer grit. And remember to knock down the rough edges with coarse paper as soon as the bondo starts curing. ( it will feel rubbery to the touch ) :)

Mercureie
07-09-2003, 11:04 AM
cool, thnx for all the insight. where can i pick some of this up? im thinkin this is what im gonna do now.

ramos
07-09-2003, 11:17 AM
Automotive stores, walmart, KMart, automotive paint stores. :)

Mercureie
07-09-2003, 11:32 AM
cool, thnx

ramos
07-09-2003, 12:03 PM
No problem brother man. :)

maylar
07-09-2003, 08:42 PM
Actually, Bondo is body filler and it's a bit overkill for a box. Plus Bondo tends to get air bubbles that just make more work.

What you want is polyester putty, called glazing compound. The best ones are Evercoat's "Easy Sand" and a product called "Icing". These compounds are like thin watery Bondo. You can spread them easily with a plastic spatula and they sand out like glass. Painters use them for the "final coat" over Bondo and for filling pin holes and stuff.

Auto paint stores carry them, NAPA does too sometimes.

paikiah
07-09-2003, 09:06 PM
how about good ol' urethane? I saw some workers put it on the roof of a building complex. After drying, it's like rubber, just like undercoating. It's supposed to insulate and waterproof problematic areas. Guess that 'd work, won't it?

BDIDDY
07-09-2003, 09:48 PM
Originally posted by paikiah
how about good ol' urethane? I saw some workers put it on the roof of a building complex. After drying, it's like rubber, just like undercoating. It's supposed to insulate and waterproof problematic areas. Guess that 'd work, won't it?



It would if you could sand it.

ramos
07-10-2003, 07:45 AM
Originally posted by maylar
Actually, Bondo is body filler and it's a bit overkill for a box. Plus Bondo tends to get air bubbles that just make more work.

What you want is polyester putty, called glazing compound. The best ones are Evercoat's "Easy Sand" and a product called "Icing". These compounds are like thin watery Bondo. You can spread them easily with a plastic spatula and they sand out like glass. Painters use them for the "final coat" over Bondo and for filling pin holes and stuff.

Auto paint stores carry them, NAPA does too sometimes.


See that's what I hate the internet. I can't see the crap :D If it's light then the glazing putty or a high build polyester primer would work great. But if it's really rough if could become a hassle using just glazing putty. :)