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debutis
06-26-2003, 01:16 PM
Had a few questions with fiberglassing.. I want to make a nice big fiberglass box for my sub and after reading quite a few articles on it, i'd like to try it. I have a ford explorer and was wondering if I could build a nice big box for my w7. I'd like to get it to fit very nice and snug in the back hatch area so this is what I propose to do.. Tell me if I'm wrong about any of this stuff. Could I just lay down some tin foil over the area I plan to work on, then put a layer of duct tape over the tine foil... Then hot glue some cheesecloth or other type of rag and then soak it in resin to take the shape that I need?? then from there take that peice out of the truck and build out the whole thing?? First off is this right? Secondly, do you see any problems with it??
How will I know how many cubes it will be and the dimensions of the port??

mgaidica
06-26-2003, 01:23 PM
yeh, u got the right idea.. and u know its gonna be messy i hope, so cover up everything in ur car.. You should be ok to take it out when it gets hard enough as to where it wont flex all that much. Just when u get done with a lot of layers of fiberglass, simply check and make sure its all going like u want.

Volume can be measured by measuring a dry source (peanuts, foam packaging things, anything.) or even water. You just need to convert it from one unit to CU ft. Then u can work on ur port based on the size box u made.

debutis
06-26-2003, 02:05 PM
So you're saying that I need to fill the thing up with water once I have everything except the port in?? Also, will the mat and resin stick to the tape??

mactastrophe
06-27-2003, 08:03 PM
AYO...A FEW THINGS...MAKE THIS ENCLOSURE AT LEAST A HALF INCH THICK OR MORE CAUSE A W7 WILL FLEX THE THING TO PIECES OTHERWISE...BRACE THIS PUPPY FROM THE INSIDE TO REDUCE FLEXIN...ALSO JUST USE TWO LAYERS OF MASKING TAPE...OR DO WHAT I DO MOST TIMES WHICH IS USE TIN FOIL FOR LARGE AREAS AND TAPE IT DOWN AROUND THE EDGES SO IT'LL STAY PUT...NOW NOTHING'S BETTER THAN SPENDIN THE TIME USE MASKING TAPE SO EVERYTHING WILL BUTT UP PERFECTLY...FOIL TENDS TO LIFT UP A LIL...

ramos
07-01-2003, 04:34 PM
I would say your on the right track. I would go to wal mart and get you some fleece for your first layer. It's a little thicker so it holds more resin. Before you remove it from your truck. You will need to add a layer of mat and or cloth depending on what your using. To make the enclosure stiff enough to remove it without it breaking apart on you. I diagree with making it really thick. It really depends on what kind and weoght of mat/ cloth your using. It's all in the bracing, and how well you sqeeze the air bubbles out. An easy way of bracing glass is to use rope. After your first layer of glass. Soak some rope in resin, then lay it on the inside sides to make stiffening ribs. Then just glass over top the rope with your next layer(s). :)

hihoslva
07-09-2003, 12:25 PM
Juse use straight-up fiberglass mat for the first layer or two (the mold).

There is no need to mess around with fleece, cheesecloth, or any other material when making a mold, especially on the floorpan. Just lay down mat.

If possible, do multiple layers all at once. There is no need to do one layer, then another, then another. By doing several layers at the same time, you make the cure and your mold that much stronger right away, reducing the risk of cracking it when pulling it out, as well as reducing the risk of heat warping it later on with more layers. It also becomes very easy to add layers, because the surface is nice and sticky.

Fleece is only really necessary when making "free-form" shapes - to stretch the fleece from one surface to another and create a flowing shape on which to later lay fiberglass. For molding, go straight to glass - it's stronger, and one less step in the process.

~HH

ramos
07-09-2003, 02:20 PM
The reason I suggest using fleece to start. Is to help the guys who have never done it before. With the fleece just layed out you see an outline of the enclosure. It allows for easy adjustments before you start if needed. And it also gives them a pattern on which to apply the mat and or cloth. It takes out some of the guess work. But no you don't need the fleece at all. Unless your using a frame. Then it makes life easier :)