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jordand505
06-12-2008, 05:50 PM
Kind of dumb question. I want a set of Polk Momo 6.5 comps. They are 4 ohm speakers, so i cant run them at 2 ohm out of the amp?

RebelDogg
06-13-2008, 06:46 PM
If they are 4 ohm speakers and the amp is rated @ 2 ohms, then the power will be significantly less. I don't know the formula for figuring this out, but an example is my KS650.2's are running off of a ZX250.2 which is rated 125w on each channel at 2 ohms. But my speakers are 4 ohms, so they are only getting 85w/channel. Which is fine because they are 75wRMS.

The important thing is that the impedance of the speakers isn't lower than what the amp is rated for. So if your speaker impedance is 1 ohm, don't use an amp that's not rated 1 ohm stable.

ashtrey1212
06-14-2008, 08:47 AM
If they are 4 ohm speakers and the amp is rated @ 2 ohms, then the power will be significantly less. I don't know the formula for figuring this out, but an example is my KS650.2's are running off of a ZX250.2 which is rated 125w on each channel at 2 ohms. But my speakers are 4 ohms, so they are only getting 85w/channel. Which is fine because they are 75wRMS.

The important thing is that the impedance of the speakers isn't lower than what the amp is rated for. So if your speaker impedance is 1 ohm, don't use an amp that's not rated 1 ohm stable.

But thats just an example you're using right? Because everyone knows that there are no such thing as 1 ohm speakers.

jmanpc
06-14-2008, 08:50 AM
But thats just an example you're using right? Because everyone knows that there are no such thing as 1 ohm speakers.

Incorrect. Some factory amplified stereos incorporate 1 ohm speakers :fyi:

OP, basically, if your speakers are 4 ohms, look at the 4 ohm power rating. There is no way to change the ohm load except by wiring in more speakers (or resistors [which would be pointess- the resistors would just eat power]).

loudcartunez
06-14-2008, 08:55 AM
U Could Connect Both 6.5s To Get A 2ohm Load Than Bridge The Amp

ashtrey1212
06-14-2008, 01:40 PM
Incorrect. Some factory amplified stereos incorporate 1 ohm speakers :fyi:

OP, basically, if your speakers are 4 ohms, look at the 4 ohm power rating. There is no way to change the ohm load except by wiring in more speakers (or resistors [which would be pointess- the resistors would just eat power]).

Well I guess you learn something new every day.:wow:

bad_trip
06-14-2008, 01:46 PM
ashtrey's sig is funny.

DBDRAGGUY
06-14-2008, 01:50 PM
Kind of dumb question. I want a set of Polk Momo 6.5 comps. They are 4 ohm speakers, so i cant run them at 2 ohm out of the amp?

A set of component speaker need to be run in stereo. The 2ohm stabilty rating of your amp most likely applies to a bridged application. The components should be a total 4ohm rating per side, putting your amp at 4ohm stereo. Even if your tweets and midrange woofers equal a load less than 4 ohms you will be fine. Most class a/b stereo amps are 2ohm stable in stereo mode.

ashtrey1212
06-14-2008, 01:53 PM
ashtrey's sig is funny.

LOL :) Thanks. Its so true though, I've never seen anyone with only one Type R. Unless it's like one 15" or something, but never just one 12" or one 10".

DB_DRAG_SPL
06-14-2008, 01:58 PM
Kind of dumb question. I want a set of Polk Momo 6.5 comps. They are 4 ohm speakers, so i cant run them at 2 ohm out of the amp?

It all depends on how many flux capacitors your amp has and what their jiggawatt ratings are.

ashtrey1212
06-14-2008, 02:03 PM
It all depends on how many flux capacitors your amp has and what their jiggawatt ratings are.

LMAO!!! Doctor Brown!!! Grab Einstien and lets go get the sports almanac from Biff so we can get rich, then blow our winnings on high powered amplifiers and speakers.

RebelDogg
06-14-2008, 02:42 PM
But thats just an example you're using right? Because everyone knows that there are no such thing as 1 ohm speakers.

(2) 4 ohm DVC subs wired in parallel = 1 ohm load. ;)

But, yes, it was just an example.