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View Full Version : What bit do you use/circle jig ?



blackbonnie
04-09-2008, 08:38 PM
what kind of bit do you guys use with a router when cutting out your speaker holes? a link would be nice. and also will This (http://www.partsexpress.com/pe/showdetl.cfm?&Partnumber=365-250) work with any router, like can i modify it if it doesnt fit mine? and does it have to be used with a plunge router? thanks for your help

RAM_Designs
04-09-2008, 08:41 PM
just a plain ol' 1/4 straight bit from home depot...

themommyvan
04-09-2008, 08:43 PM
You can modify it. Use a spiral upcut bit.

blackbonnie
04-09-2008, 08:52 PM
so one like this (http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=10051&langId=-1&catalogId=10053&productId=100301497&N=10000003+524413+90401)? also if you use that will it also drill through the wood, or will you have to go through a pre-existing whole/ drill a hole for it?

mlstrass
04-09-2008, 09:06 PM
one like this is MUCH better and will make it's own hole no problem.

http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?jspStoreDir=hdus&catalogId=10053&productId=100046844&navFlow=3&keyword=spiral+upcut&langId=-1&searchRedirect=spiral+upcut&storeId=10051&endecaDataBean=com.homedepot.sa.el.wc.catalog.bean s.EndecaDataBean%4047ed6bdf&ddkey=Search

blackbonnie
04-09-2008, 09:14 PM
and do i have to have a plunge router or will one like this (http://www.lowes.com/lowes/lkn?action=productDetail&productId=141184-353-1810&lpage=none) work

themommyvan
04-09-2008, 09:15 PM
I dont think you can use a fixed base

Propimp
04-09-2008, 09:22 PM
you can use a fixed base router to make circles, My fixed base you can still raise and lower 1" Set up your circle jig and see where your router has to start, You have to drill a hole where you are going to start the router, set the router so the bit is showing about 1/4inch, put the router in the hole you drilled, turn on and do a pass.

Stop the router and adjust to 1/2" do anouther then a hair over 3/4 and uor done.

This is what I have done and have had no problem, Just dont force the router let it cut the wood its self.

blackbonnie
04-09-2008, 09:25 PM
sounds good, thank you

BrianChia
04-09-2008, 09:38 PM
Jasper Jigs break way too easily, and they are not cheap. I like 1/4" MDF. You can make your own jigs as long as you have the right screws for the base of your router (they often come with them).

blackbonnie
04-09-2008, 09:49 PM
any tips, or tutorials on how to make one brian

Propimp
04-09-2008, 09:50 PM
Jasper Jigs break way too easily, and they are not cheap. I like 1/4" MDF. You can make your own jigs as long as you have the right screws for the base of your router (they often come with them).

Thats what I did. But i messed up taking into account the width of the bit. my first couple of cuts were a tap off.

grassroots
04-09-2008, 09:55 PM
i just use a plunge router bit... works great... ear plugs recommended...

BrianChia
04-10-2008, 12:23 AM
Get a piece of MDF and cut it about the width of the router base and the length should be at least three quarters of the diameter of the circle. Find the proper screws/screw holes on the base of your router and mark on the MDF where it should mount to the base. Drill the holes out for the mounting screws and countersink them so the bottom surface of MDF is flat. Then mount the jig and plunge the router down, and turn it on to put a hole in the MDF right where the bit is. Remove the jig, use the router or a jig saw to cut the hole larger (like 1.5" diameter) to accomodate the shank of the bit and so you can see where you are routing.

To make the pivot hole, mount the jig to the base of the router and pluge the bit so it is just level with the base/jig. Use a ruler and measure from the outside edge of the bit (if it is fluted, make sure to measure the tip of the flute) and measure to somewhere on the jig and mark it. This should be the exact radius of the circle. Then just drill a hole where you marked and put a pivot pin through the jig and into the work piece.

bjfish11
04-10-2008, 06:57 AM
one like this is MUCH better and will make it's own hole no problem.

http://www.homedepot.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?jspStoreDir=hdus&catalogId=10053&productId=100046844&navFlow=3&keyword=spiral+upcut&langId=-1&searchRedirect=spiral+upcut&storeId=10051&endecaDataBean=com.homedepot.sa.el.wc.catalog.bean s.EndecaDataBean%4047ed6bdf&ddkey=Search

x2


Jasper Jigs break way too easily, and they are not cheap. I like 1/4" MDF. You can make your own jigs as long as you have the right screws for the base of your router (they often come with them).

How do you manage to break your jasper jigs? I have only broken one, because I knocked my router off the table, lol.

ramos
04-10-2008, 08:43 AM
How do you manage to break your jasper jigs? I have only broken one, because I knocked my router off the table, lol.


Good question. I have broken two in 10 years ( still have four of them ) Threw one in the floor board of my car with the router still attached. Wasn't paying attention when I closed the door, and didn't notice the jasper jig was wedged beside the seat and sticking out the door . Slammed the door shut............snap.

The other was the same as you , knocked the **** router off the table .......snap :)

BrianChia
04-10-2008, 08:52 AM
x2



How do you manage to break your jasper jigs? I have only broken one, because I knocked my router off the table, lol.

Depends on the kind of router you use I guess. If the base of the router has a recessed mounting screw hole/thread insert, then it is difficult to tighten them all the way without weakening the plastic. The countersunk area of the plastic is very weak and brittle and I cracked my first one simply by trying to tighten it on the base of the router. I've damaged a few this way--I guess maybe my router is to blame then? Then I broke another one by dropping it (again, where the countersunk mounting holes are).