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View Full Version : How strong is Wood Glue?



IDSkoT
04-06-2008, 05:09 AM
How much weight do you think it can support? [Pulling on it]

I don't have any weights to test this.

Does anyone have a link to where they test different glues to weight on different kinds of surfaces?

bdawson72
04-06-2008, 05:13 AM
no idea.


but its strong enough.

Audio Junkies
04-06-2008, 05:15 AM
http://www.audiojunkies.com/blog/346/best-wood-glue-wood-glue-showdown

Reson8
04-06-2008, 06:51 AM
Tagged for later reading.

skydeaner
04-06-2008, 07:07 AM
titebond ultimate is all i ever use. It is called ULTIMATE for a reason, duh silly!

iDesignBoxes
04-06-2008, 09:18 AM
Interesting comparison... Gonna be using TU from now on. How does CA glue compare to these?

req
04-06-2008, 10:14 AM
on plastic and crap im sure it works better.

wood glue was made for WOOD.


use the right glue for the job and you wont be disappointed.

IDSkoT
04-06-2008, 12:29 PM
Well, honestly this was posted in the wrong section 'cause I didn't really know which section to put it in. But I'm building a TV-Stand type of thing and I don't know what to use for the bracing.


ref image [Same bracing on the right as on the left]
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v714/TwistedShot/TV%20Stand-puter/PCStandxbox.jpg

Immacomputer
04-06-2008, 12:36 PM
How much a single joint can hold is not only dependent on the wood glue used but also on the wood used and the surface area that you're applying it to.

If you're planning on using MDF, that structure will probably not support too much weight and will probably flex over time. MDF isn't really a load bearing wood.

If you're not putting anything heavy on top, you will probably be fine though. I would worry much more about the wood than the joints. If you're not using MDF and some kind of hardwood, you should be in better shape. Maybe beef up the rear 90* support though; I would probably double its thickness to keep it strong.

IDSkoT
04-06-2008, 01:01 PM
How much a single joint can hold is not only dependent on the wood glue used but also on the wood used and the surface area that you're applying it to.

If you're planning on using MDF, that structure will probably not support too much weight and will probably flex over time. MDF isn't really a load bearing wood.

If you're not putting anything heavy on top, you will probably be fine though. I would worry much more about the wood than the joints. If you're not using MDF and some kind of hardwood, you should be in better shape. Maybe beef up the rear 90* support though; I would probably double its thickness to keep it strong.

Yeah, I know what you mean. I'm not sure which wood to use. I was thinking MDF, but then I realized that all the heat/weight would ROCK it.

The top shelf will hold an Xbox, controllers, maybe a few games... and, knowing me, cups. It's not back-breaking weight... only about ~25 lbs at most. But the wood itself will be pretty heavy. I might double-up the strips. It's all based around getting 1 or 2 sheets of 3/4" wood. I could upgrade to 1" if necessary. But, I didn't want a like 3" x 2" beam going up since I don't know how to do that. But, I guess I can double up the strips and make 2 strips of 1" thick, then glue them together and have a 1"x1-1/2", or maybe boost it to 2"x1-1/2[or 2-1/4" with three strips]

What I never thought of was bracing for the shelf that will hold my TV. It's a 27" Tube TV [SDTV lolz... but it's pretty ******. A really good TV for the like $70 bucks I paid for it], so it's pretty bulky and heavy. I'm not sure how heavy exactly.


Do you suggest a type of wood? I've heard Birch wood was ******... but I'm not sure about it's integrity.




EDIT: 350 post :veryhapp:

MyFartsStink
04-06-2008, 01:08 PM
I know some one has tested elmers wood glue and the wood breaks before the bond breaks, so I guess it would be strong enough.

IDSkoT
04-06-2008, 01:09 PM
I know some one has tested elmers wood glue and the wood breaks before the bond breaks, so I guess it would be strong enough.


****, really? Looks like I'm getting Elmer's Wood Glue. >_>

MyFartsStink
04-06-2008, 01:14 PM
****, really? Looks like I'm getting Elmer's Wood Glue. >_>

I would get tightbond though. As that seems to be stronger. Both did the same thing. But still I like to work with tight bond more.

IDSkoT
04-06-2008, 01:16 PM
I would get tightbond though. As that seems to be stronger. Both did the same thing. But still I like to work with tight bond more.

Any online store I have to get it from? Or do you think they'll sell it at like Ace or Home Depot?

hatemonger
04-06-2008, 01:17 PM
Any online store I have to get it from? Or do you think they'll sell it at like Ace or Home Depot?

home depot sells all 3 titebond types.

97gp
04-06-2008, 01:26 PM
I know some one has tested elmers wood glue and the wood breaks before the bond breaks, so I guess it would be strong enough.

Yeah, the actual glue joint is stronger than the wood.

ShiningBuick
04-06-2008, 01:30 PM
If you've ever broken a wood blue joint, you can see a layer of wood onto of the glue, which shows where the wood ripped off of other wood before the glue let go of it.

hatemonger
04-06-2008, 01:33 PM
the joint is stronger on certain types of wood, mdf, particle board etc. manufactured wood. on natural wood like oak, pine, etc., it isn't as strong, but still pretty strong. stronger than nails and more pleasing to the eye than screw heads.

IDSkoT
04-06-2008, 01:41 PM
the joint is stronger on certain types of wood, mdf, particle board etc. manufactured wood. on natural wood like oak, pine, etc., it isn't as strong, but still pretty strong. stronger than nails and more pleasing to the eye than screw heads.

Which wood should I use?

Immacomputer
04-06-2008, 02:01 PM
Birch ply or Oak ply are good choices that can look nice and are pretty strong. Blond wood is also pretty decent looking and as strong or stronger than MDF. It's also the same price and the grain is pretty pleasing to the eye. It is full of voids though which can really vary the strength of the wood.

I would use Titebond II or III for a job like this. Again, the glue isn't going to be the weak point in this.

Since you're only going to have a few things on the shelf, you should be fine as far as supports. I would still beef some things up a little. Check out this picture of yours that I modified:
http://aycu03.webshots.com/image/50002/2004455793772283247_fs.jpg


The red line is what I was meaning about beefing up the 90* support. I wouldn't double it as in thickness (1.5" instead of .75") but as in length. I would also add a single blue support for the middle of the shelf so it doesn't sag over time (which it will no matter what kind of wood you use). It doesn't have to be elaborate like the sides but something is needed there.

If you can't do a support like the blue one pictured, I would definitely run some parallel braces under the top panel. Make sure to make them about 2" tall and attach them perpendicular (like a T) with the top panel.

IDSkoT
04-06-2008, 03:07 PM
Sounds good. How thick do you suggest the 90 degree support beams be?


Picture Edit::


[ref img: made the beams bigger and added 2 heavy duty middle supports]
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v714/TwistedShot/TV%20Stand-puter/Shelfsupport.jpg

[ref img: added support on the bottom to hold up the other weight]
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v714/TwistedShot/TV%20Stand-puter/Bottomsupport.jpg

dbman150
04-06-2008, 04:20 PM
i find that titebond ll works the best for me

keithace
04-06-2008, 07:47 PM
gorilla glue worked pretty good for me...i swear by it...

miker
04-06-2008, 08:57 PM
That stuff expands like crazy

IDSkoT
04-06-2008, 09:23 PM
That stuff expands like crazy

Truth... and it doesn't even work that well [at least when I used it... though, admitably I forgot what I used it on.]

keithace
04-17-2008, 08:04 PM
gotta clamp it tight...i have never had a problem with it...as long as you dont get all crazy with it...you're fine...and read the directions...

dragnix
04-17-2008, 08:06 PM
glue your nuts together with wood glue and see if you can separate them. But remember, you have to clamp it tight

maldecido33
04-17-2008, 08:13 PM
Gorilla glue should not be used on wood, nor should liquid nails.

dragnix
04-17-2008, 08:14 PM
Gorilla glue should not be used on wood, nor should liquid nails.

not sure how true this is, but there was a test done that said Gorilla glue is not as strong as Wood glue when used on wood. Go figures.

maldecido33
04-17-2008, 08:25 PM
It's not designed from wood, so why should it be used for wood?

I'm sorry, but I don't want something that EXPANDS as it dries to expand my two pieces of wood apart.

Heavy Hitta
04-17-2008, 09:47 PM
best glue i had ever used it "PL Premium Constructon Adhesive"....the wood will break before the glue! wear glovesssss!!!