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lostdaytomorrow
02-11-2008, 12:46 AM
Hey guys, my dad gave me a Ryobi router for Christmas. The one with big black handles on each side in a big blue plastic case. I don't have bits for it or anything yet though. He also got me a really nice Dremel, the nicest one Home Depot sells at least. And I got about 500 attachments for the Dremel.

Can I use the router to make MDF baffles for my front components that will be mounted in the door?

Will a route cut out 3/4" MDF or do I need a jigsaw or something?

Thanks for the help. I've never used anything except a circular saw and I don't have a big shop or anything.

ultimate157
02-11-2008, 12:51 AM
When using a router on 3/4" MDF, do multiple passes.

For single baffle, I hear 2 passes @ 3/8" works, 3 passes for double baffle.

A good bit to use is a spiral upcut, or a double fluted straight cut.

A Jasper jig would help a great deal to make perfect circles.

BrianChia
02-11-2008, 12:58 AM
Use a circle jig to make circle cuts (obviously). I've used the Jasper but I usually just make my own jig from 1/4" MDF. I would do 3 passes for 3/4" and 5 passes for double layer. I've snapped bits trying to do double passes.

Good bits to have are straight cut (either spiral up cut or double fluted), roundover (I use 1/4", 3/8", and 1/2"), flush-trim (double fluted with ballbearing), and a mortise bit (for flush mounting).

Route slowly and be sure to have very good dust and eye protection.

lostdaytomorrow
02-11-2008, 01:09 AM
So, what exactly makes it where I'm not free-handing it and it actually makes a circle? Is there a compass type thing that will make it pivot or what?

BrianChia
02-11-2008, 01:23 AM
Search for "Jasper Jig". It screws to the bottom of your router and has many predrilled holes where you can attach a pivot pin. The pivot pin allows you route a circle without freehanding it.