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View Full Version : Preout Voltage ? 4V and 2.2V ? BIG Differenece?



Rookie_80
01-03-2008, 06:00 PM
I have Pioneer DEH-P5800MP Head Unit with:
Preout Voltage & Impedance of 2.2V, 1k Ohm

My friend has DEH-P5900IB Pioneer's newer model with :
Preout Voltage & Impedance Hi-Volt (4V), 100 ohm


So he says because he has higher voltage it will increase quality sound of his whole system inlcuding subs.


Is that true? Coz i always thought it's mostly about your amp and subwoofer.

cam5860
01-03-2008, 07:21 PM
Yes it makes a huge difference specially when driving subwoofers. For one the stronger the signal going to the amp the less gain you have to use on your amp which means better sound quality. Second you get a stronger cleaner sound which is very noticable when driving subs. Third your subs will hit much cleaner and harder without turning the gain up on your amp.

squeak9798
01-03-2008, 07:24 PM
Yes it makes a huge difference specially when driving subwoofers. For one the stronger the signal going to the amp the less gain you have to use on your amp which means better sound quality. Second you get a stronger cleaner sound which is very noticable when driving subs. Third your subs will hit much cleaner and harder without turning the gain up on your amp.

None of that is true......well, I take that back. The only accurate statement you made is that the gain will be set lower with a higher voltage signal. But everything else you said, and the effects you attribute to having a lower set gain, are all completely wrong and inaccurate.

squeak9798
01-03-2008, 07:26 PM
So he says because he has higher voltage it will increase quality sound of his whole system inlcuding subs.


Is that true?

Short answer; No.

Try doing some searches. I know we've addressed this issue on this forum, at length, dozens of times.

Lakota
01-03-2008, 07:30 PM
Affects how much you have to adjust the gain knob. That's really it.

Raven
01-03-2008, 07:31 PM
IMO the output impedance would have just as big an effect in that setup as the output voltage itself. Listen to squeak9798.

Rookie_80
01-04-2008, 12:13 PM
Thanks for your input guys.
Really helps.

WrenchGuy
01-04-2008, 12:48 PM
You only get those voltages at full power anyway. By then your clipped and all that jive.

cam5860
01-04-2008, 01:58 PM
look at it like this! With a 2 volt signal going to your amp is like running 50 foot of rca cables to your amp. And running 5 volt preouts would be like running 10 foot of rca cables to your amp. All the headunit does is send a signal to the amp but how strong and clean the signal is depends on how clean the amp can deliver the output. All a amp does is boost the signal coming in so how strong and clean the signal is means alot as to how good your music will sound.

GSRswapandslow
01-04-2008, 02:06 PM
look at it like this! With a 2 volt signal going to your amp is like running 50 foot of rca cables to your amp. And running 5 volt preouts would be like running 10 foot of rca cables to your amp. All the headunit does is send a signal to the amp but how strong and clean the signal is depends on how clean the amp can deliver the output. All a amp does is boost the signal coming in so how strong and clean the signal is means alot as to how good your music will sound.

fail, even after getting corrected

squeak9798
01-04-2008, 07:25 PM
look at it like this! With a 2 volt signal going to your amp is like running 50 foot of rca cables to your amp. And running 5 volt preouts would be like running 10 foot of rca cables to your amp.

To start, that's not even a good example.

The levels of current are so small at preamp levels that voltage drop as a result of the wire will be negligible at best.


All the headunit does is send a signal to the amp but how strong and clean the signal is depends on how clean the amp can deliver the output.

That statement doesn't even make any sense.

Why would the headunit's output depend on the amplifier's output :confused:

But, since I think you were trying to say that the amp having a "clean" output depends on the "strength" and "cleanliness" of the signal from the headunit, let's examine that a minute.

Yes, the amplifier's output is dependent upon the strength of the input signal. But this is EXACTLY what the gain knob on the amplifier is for ! To allow the amplifier to provide full power output with a wide range of input signals. The fact is that most amps on the market can make full power output with as little as .2 - .3V. So the 2V preamp output isn't an issue as far as the amplifier producing full output power, and the 5V is not any "better" here since the 2V is more than sufficient.

The only way the signal strength is going to affect the "cleanliness" of the amplifier is if that amplifier is so poorly designed that it produces audible noise with a higher set gain due to the diminished SNR. However, at this stage in the game there are very few amps, even on the low end market, that this is really much of an issue with anymore. And really all it indicates is that you have a poorly designed amplifier that needs replaced as this is a fault of the amplifier, not the signal strength.

About the only things the input signal strength affects; the gain setting.

Lastly, a 5V signal is not inherently "cleaner" than a 2V signal. There's no inherent "cleanliness" or "sound" advantage to a 5V signal over a 2V signal.



All a amp does is boost the signal coming in so how strong and clean the signal is means alot as to how good your music will sound.

See above.

There is nothing that makes a 5V signal inherently "cleaner" or "better sounding" than a 2V signal.

And the strength of the signal plays a very limited roll in the amplifier's output, primarily only dictating where the gain knob needs set. That's about all.

Now.....stop trying, you're wrong.

U n K n O w N ?
01-04-2008, 07:36 PM
So what Voltage Lvl would you recommned for the SAZ 3000d? 4-6Vs? I heard 8v isnt that great of a match for the Sundowns or sum amps