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View Full Version : so chevyaudio was right....



IgnoreMe
09-09-2007, 12:00 AM
well ive always used liquid nails for as long as ive been building boxes (save the last 2 that ive built which i decided, hell might as well give woodglue a shot).

and my stance has always been:

"liquid nails works fine. the joints hold together strong enough that i cant break them by hand" which was true. now ive never kept a box for that long so no joint wear has taken place. i always made new ones.

my friend who recently bought to 18's bl's had a 15" xxx in a box i built a good 2 years ago. the liquid nails worked fine...or so we thought. he took the screws out of the box joints...and the **** wall fell off. not just 1...but 3 of them. no pressure, no pushing, they just fell off.

never again will i claim liquid nails is a fine product to use for building subwoofer enclosures. if your going to keep your box for a very short time...sure...but if you want it to last dont use that ****. my experiences never showed me this which is why i stood by liquid nails and its uses. no more. my apologies to chevyaudio for disregarding his advice and defending my own (although i built these last two boxes using woodglue on account of his suggestion, just to try something new, before this whole xxx box experience)

Flipx99
09-09-2007, 12:01 AM
You **** at building boxes.

:fyi:

CJL
09-09-2007, 12:02 AM
1st

IgnoreMe
09-09-2007, 12:03 AM
lol

^^^f'd up man


we use our experiences to build our ideas and what we feel is true...liquid nails always worked fine since my enclosures were always switched out and rebuilt, but once i saw what happens to the average person that will keep an enclosure for a long time...my new experience showed me the downfalls of what i used to do.

bdawson72
09-09-2007, 12:04 AM
1st

Pwnt, u were 2nd.

CJL
09-09-2007, 12:07 AM
1st


FAIL

:crap:

IgnoreMe
09-09-2007, 12:18 AM
since no one will say it i will

<<<<<<<<<<<<<<idiot


<<<<<<<<<<<<<<<*****

<<<<<<<<<<<<*******


<<<<<<<<<<<<retard

Flipx99
09-09-2007, 12:18 AM
^^ no homo

IgnoreMe
09-09-2007, 12:20 AM
<<<<homo

happy?

Flipx99
09-09-2007, 12:21 AM
You are okay...

:)

jmanpc
09-09-2007, 12:22 AM
yeah i used gorilla glue till a box completely fell apart during shipping because i took the screws out for a sleek look.

IgnoreMe
09-09-2007, 12:22 AM
You are okay...

:)

it that only cause i said i was a homo? you got something to tell us flip?

Lil Poot
09-09-2007, 12:29 AM
i've always used titebond 3. no problems here.

IgnoreMe
09-09-2007, 12:30 AM
quick question...which sets up faster

regular titebond, II, or III?

not to mention i love how you can wash woodglue off. liquid nails in like dinosaur jizz thats dried in your jeans cause you rubbed up against a seam on the box

Lil Poot
09-09-2007, 12:33 AM
not sure, haven't tried the others. i believe 3 is supposed to be the strongest once it's dry, it recommends leaving it clamped for an hour.

hempy
09-09-2007, 12:37 AM
I believe III is just a water-resistant version of II. Any of the three should be fine honestly. Elmers is great too. Plus it's usually cheaper.

dleccord
09-09-2007, 12:40 AM
CA glue, if you're rich like me.

PatFitz9
09-09-2007, 12:49 AM
i don't know why people are so against using wood glue... we are glueing WOOD after all. i guess everyone is welcome to try out other glues, but i never understood the point. and wood glue is cheap.

IgnoreMe
09-09-2007, 12:53 AM
i wasnt against wood glue.

i was just used to using liquid nails since thats what i started with and read about. you dont know better until you experience it yourself :)

carguy83
09-09-2007, 03:30 AM
i use elmer's carpenter glue for my boxes. they hold up like a champ. it's pretty cheap too, you can get a gallon jug at home depot for fairly cheap. :)

Lakota
09-09-2007, 09:25 AM
I've always just used wood glue because it is chemically designed for WOOD.

bdawson72
09-09-2007, 09:28 AM
I've always just used wood glue because it is chemically designed for WOOD.

Brilliant

J31Rob
09-09-2007, 09:41 AM
i don't know why people are so against using wood glue... we are glueing WOOD after all. i guess everyone is welcome to try out other glues, but i never understood the point. and wood glue is cheap.


I've always just used wood glue because it is chemically designed for WOOD.

MDF isn't all wood. :fyi:

It's a glue, resin & chipped wood mixture or bamboo & rice straw.

PatFitz9
09-09-2007, 09:45 AM
MDF isn't wood. :fyi:

yes, it is :fyi:

it's made from wood waste, wax, and resin.

nice edit ;)

J31Rob
09-09-2007, 09:45 AM
Notice my post, my ninja. Edited before you posted.

J31Rob
09-09-2007, 09:46 AM
yes, it is :fyi:

it's made from wood waste, wax, and resin.

nice edit ;)

http://remodeling.hw.net/industry-news.asp?sectionID=157&articleID=534415

& yeah, I realized I WAS wrong.. lol, I was thinking it was something else.. but it IS wood, just not 100&#37; wood.

Megalomaniac
09-09-2007, 10:57 AM
Chevyaudio is pretty smart when building boxes :)

IgnoreMe
09-09-2007, 10:58 AM
well ive heard it from a bunch of people. it just so happened to be chevyaudio the last time i tried to stay liquidnails was just as good lol

dbman150
09-09-2007, 12:04 PM
i think titebond II works the best imo

PV Audio
09-09-2007, 12:17 PM
i've always used titebond 3. no problems here.


quick question...which sets up faster

regular titebond, II, or III?

not to mention i love how you can wash woodglue off. liquid nails in like dinosaur jizz thats dried in your jeans cause you rubbed up against a seam on the box


not sure, haven't tried the others. i believe 3 is supposed to be the strongest once it's dry, it recommends leaving it clamped for an hour.


I believe III is just a water-resistant version of II. Any of the three should be fine honestly. Elmers is great too. Plus it's usually cheaper.
Titebond I is your average woodglue. Compare it to Elmer's carpenter's woodglue. It works fine in most applications, and dries very quickly. It also sands very cleanly and doesn't leave a dark residue like the other titebond glues do. Problem is this, the mechanical strength of the joint is not as high as other glues. It works fine for loudspeaker cabinets, but doesn't provide as strong a joint as the others do when using it in high SPL applications.

Titebond II is your glue of choice. It costs very little more than T1 does, and is significantly stronger. It does take a bit longer to dry, and doesn't sand as easily. You will notice, however, that if you let it dry runny on the box and don't sand it, the endgrain will be hard as **** to sand clean. That is what you want, because the glue seeps inside the joints further to create a stronger bond. It usually sets completely in 40 minutes or so, but if you are using screws (I'm not a fan of nails as they don't bite as well, although they are faster), you can keep working.

Titebond III is absolutely useless for us. The only time you would need to use T3 is if you're trying to glue your house together. It is actually much stronger than T2 by a lot, but you will never need it. It costs almost 2x that of T2, and it takes days to fully cure. It doesn't dry hard, it dries kind of gummy which is **** near impossible to sand off without taking down a lot of wood with it. There is no situation in car audio where you would need this glue, so just don't buy it. It may be stronger, but you'll never know because T2 works fine for anything in car audio.

Elmer's Probond is actually my glue of choice. It is comparable to T2, costs about the same, and holds about the same. Thing is, it's a bit more viscous so it tends to stay on the wood longer while lining up the panels instead of spilling over. It dries rock hard which makes it incredibly easy to sand, and also allows you to break off the excess while it dries. It seeps into the wood a bit though, so wipe off the excess with a wet towel.

Hope this helps.

-Dave

Twistid
09-09-2007, 12:21 PM
titebond + tack nailor

noobs

Lil Poot
09-09-2007, 12:26 PM
thanks for clearing that up pv, i'll give the elmers a shot. going to be starting on the box for my 18 in the next 2 or 3 weeks, will probably put up a build thread.

PV Audio
09-09-2007, 12:33 PM
No problem, glad to help if I can. What you should really focus on instead of the type of glue, however, is the type of joint. I won't go into detail about joint types here, but just keep in mind, if you clamp the joint down and glue doesn't run out on both sides, you didn't use enough.