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irupp33
07-01-2007, 11:38 PM
OKay on my Kicker KX 6.5s what kind of load would the amp be seeing going to the crossover? Say a 2 channel amp and one channel going to the input on each crossover? Like im pretty sure the tweet is 4 ohn and the mid is 4 so does the amp see a 2 or 8 ohm load on each channel?

CGG318
07-02-2007, 09:22 AM
You could check the resistance w/ a DMM.

wesl56
07-02-2007, 09:40 AM
4... the crossover doesnt **** with the impedance

adam71
07-02-2007, 11:11 AM
4... the crossover doesnt **** with the impedance

Actually I believe the crossover does dictate the impedance. That is why there are 4 ohm crossovers and 8 ohm crossovers. THe drivers in the kicker set may very well be 4 ohm but the crossover (when used) dictates what load the amplifier sees.

Otherwise if the drivers in that component set were both 4 ohm then the amplifier would be seeing a 2 ohm load. But if the set says it is a 4 ohm set then how is this done if the xover is not doing this.??

helotaxi
07-02-2007, 11:39 AM
Actually I believe the crossover does dictate the impedance. That is why there are 4 ohm crossovers and 8 ohm crossovers. THe drivers in the kicker set may very well be 4 ohm but the crossover (when used) dictates what load the amplifier sees.

Otherwise if the drivers in that component set were both 4 ohm then the amplifier would be seeing a 2 ohm load. But if the set says it is a 4 ohm set then how is this done if the xover is not doing this.??
In a set where both the mid and tweet are 4 ohm, the amp sees a 4 ohm load. The 4 and 8 ohm crossovers determine what impedance the crossover circuit needs to have on it for the crossover to work right. Use any filter calculator and it will ask you the driver impedance. Change the impedance and the component values in the resultant design change as well. Also if you consider a simple second order filter, the cap and the coil change in opposite directions with a change in impedance. If you were to wire a 4 ohm driver to a filter meant for a 8 ohm driver, you end up with a staggered filter, the filter will begin to roll off higher than designed (for a low pass filter) at 6 dB/oct and then will turn into a 12dB/oct filter at a freq lower than designed. The driver imp determines the freq at which the different components in the filter begin to have their effect.

The way a crossover works is that the low pass portion of the crossover increases the resultant impedance of its branch of the circuit above the crossover freq and the high pass portion increases below the crossover freq. The result is that the overall impedance of the network as a whole is the same as the given drivers for their portion of the frequency spectrum Above the crossover freq, the impedance that the amp "sees" is that of the high freq driver and below that it's the impedance of the low freq driver.

adam71
07-02-2007, 11:46 AM
In a set where both the mid and tweet are 4 ohm, the amp sees a 4 ohm load. The 4 and 8 ohm crossovers determine what impedance the crossover circuit needs to have on it for the crossover to work right. Use any filter calculator and it will ask you the driver impedance. Change the impedance and the component values in the resultant design change as well. Also if you consider a simple second order filter, the cap and the coil change in opposite directions with a change in impedance. If you were to wire a 4 ohm driver to a filter meant for a 8 ohm driver, you end up with a staggered filter, the filter will begin to roll off higher than designed (for a low pass filter) at 6 dB/oct and then will turn into a 12dB/oct filter at a freq lower than designed. The driver imp determines the freq at which the different components in the filter begin to have their effect.

The way a crossover works is that the low pass portion of the crossover increases the resultant impedance of its branch of the circuit above the crossover freq and the high pass portion increases below the crossover freq. The result is that the overall impedance of the network as a whole is the same as the given drivers for their portion of the frequency spectrum Above the crossover freq, the impedance that the amp "sees" is that of the high freq driver and below that it's the impedance of the low freq driver.

Uhhhhhhh...........thanx.:cool: