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Trendkill
06-12-2007, 01:36 PM
I realize this is probably a preference thing that varies from person to person, but what is a general frequency range for midbass drivers so that I can start toying around with it?

Also, would 5.25" drivers (like from a set of components) be sufficient for midbass? Maybe I'm imagining it the wrong way but it seems like there would be a huge gap between the 12" sub I want to run and the 5.25" speaker.

skadude016
06-12-2007, 01:37 PM
i have my mid's crossed over down to 100hz. sounds good to me :) mine didnt like 80 so much

jdawg
06-12-2007, 02:05 PM
I try to go lower, like down to 60hz but you need GOOD mids, a 6.5 is almost required, good solid power to them and doors deadened and sealed up. HU power wont cut it. In general though around 100hz is a good starting point, you can go from there.

Fixxer
06-12-2007, 02:16 PM
Midbass is 100-300hz, Midrange is 300hz-3.5khz... You can play with those numbers based on what your drivers like. (3-way)

You are actually talking about mid not a midbass which in a typical 2-way setup you would have to cross it lower, anywhere from 80-100hz.

Trendkill
06-12-2007, 02:37 PM
Ah ok so, am I sacrificing much by going 2 way and using the 5.25 for 80-3.5hz as opposed to going 3 way?

DejaWiz
06-12-2007, 02:41 PM
Depending on the speakers, no. A 5.25 won't generally have the low extension and prominence of a 6.5, but there are some 5.25's that can do the job.

DBfan187
06-12-2007, 02:44 PM
65Hz-400Hz

xtremekustomz
06-12-2007, 04:45 PM
I'm still playing around with mine but right now they are set from 63-200. The 200 will probably go down a little bit but I'm using Dynaudio 8's

Hebrew Hammer
06-12-2007, 05:35 PM
there are lower male vocals in the 250hz and lower......so you really want to keep the midbass no higher than 250...preferably in the 100hz area down to as low as they can play...if 40hz then great!!!!...

Fixxer
06-12-2007, 07:07 PM
From the AC DQXS Manual:


Sub-bass: 100 Hz and below - A car without bass is like a day without sunshine, unless you live where we do because most of the days in the Pacific Northwest do not have sunshine. Bass is one of the more critical areas and it is also one of the most difficult to properly reproduce. Most people prefer their bass frequencies to be 6 to 9 dB louder than the rest of their system, although there are some crazy folks that prefer their bass substantially louder. The key in this area is to have enough speakers and power to produce the amount of bass you desire. But don’t use the controls on the DQXS to try and force your speakers to produce sounds they can’t. Too much bass boost creates a condition called “speakerus explodus”, which is not pretty to hear or watch.
Midbass: 100 Hz to 300Hz: - The phrase, “too much of a good thing”, can certainly apply to the midbass frequencies. This is the transition area of the audio spectrum that is an octave above your sub-bass frequencies and several octaves below your midrange. Most autosound systems have too much mid-bass due to the fact that speakers mounted in the doors or kick panels cause resonances or peaks in the response curve. These peaks in the mid-bass can actually mask or block sounds in the all-important midrange area causing your system to sound dull and lifeless.
Midrange: 300Hz to 3kHz - Musical instruments, vocals, mid-range percussion and many things we associate with imaging and staging happen in this area of the bandwidth. For that reason you will want to keep this area as smooth and balanced as possible. Too much boosting can make you feel like you are listening to your system in a tile bathroom. Not enough energy in the midrange sounds empty and dry.
Treble: 3KHz and Up - If midrange is the cake, then these high or upper frequencies are the frosting. Many autosound systems start a gradual decline in this area which is why speaker placement is very important. The DQXS only gives you a few controls in this area because too much boosting can really make a speaker sound unnatural.

newusername
06-12-2007, 07:13 PM
there are lower male vocals in the 250hz and lower......so you really want to keep the midbass no higher than 250...preferably in the 100hz area down to as low as they can play...if 40hz then great!!!!...

Originally, I agreed that playing as low as possible was a good idea. Lately, I'm not quite so sure of this...

I saw some very credible advice from Andy Wehmeyer on this several months ago; I'll take a moment to check that out. Following what he said in a recent vehicle, we were able to cross over much higher using smaller mids up front and achieve success.

I think for the average person, it is very challenging to integrate midbass with sufficient impact at 40Hz. I love the sound, but I'm not totally sure that it is the *best* option.

MiniVanMan
06-13-2007, 04:10 AM
Originally, I agreed that playing as low as possible was a good idea. Lately, I'm not quite so sure of this...

I saw some very credible advice from Andy Wehmeyer on this several months ago; I'll take a moment to check that out. Following what he said in a recent vehicle, we were able to cross over much higher using smaller mids up front and achieve success.

I think for the average person, it is very challenging to integrate midbass with sufficient impact at 40Hz. I love the sound, but I'm not totally sure that it is the *best* option.

This entire hobby is about "making it work". So, yeah, you can integrate a midrange a bit higher if you know what you're doing. If it wasn't possible dome midranges wouldn't exist. It can be very challenging in a car though, when you have 2 drivers meeting up in the vocal range playing on different axis' and different path lengths, you can have some integration problems. To be fair though, this problem exists on the top end as well. Most high end component sets cross over their tweeter in the 2-3k range. That's generally the top end range of vocals, especially female. So, if many don't see it as a problem with a 2-way, then the argument doesn't exist in a 3-way. At least for those people.

We all know the perfect speaker is one that plays flat from 20 hz to 20 khz. Since this isn't realistic, especially in a car, we're relegated to bulky passive crossovers, or endless hours of tuning our active setups. We have to be concerned with timbre differences between the drivers we've selected, and just a whole slew of other problems.

So, my answer to the argument of midranges should play lower than 200 hz is, "well, yeah, we should also be sitting in the middle of our cars, with bookshelf style speakers on top of our dashes."

Again, it's all about making it work.