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View Full Version : I never used a table saw......what are the pros and cons



iamamp3pimp
04-30-2007, 09:16 PM
and the maximum rip widths...i was in the store looking, and it doesnt look like i can go bigger than 16 inches.


wtf?

fwb_1234
04-30-2007, 09:21 PM
well you definitely can, where are you looking. Those fences they have are small at places like lowes and HD because they dont have the floor space to put a huge 5ft fence.

PatFitz9
04-30-2007, 09:22 PM
they go bigger... the table saw i want to get from home depot is the Rigid TS3650. 36 inch rip. i would post a link, but home depot's site is dumb.

iamamp3pimp
04-30-2007, 09:23 PM
i looked @ lowes.
im guessing the fence is what the wood rides up against?

PatFitz9
04-30-2007, 09:25 PM
yup, thats the fence

iamamp3pimp
04-30-2007, 09:30 PM
im gonna have to look into building a work table then i suppose?

PatFitz9
04-30-2007, 09:44 PM
that would probably be best. the bigger table saws are much more expensive

iamamp3pimp
04-30-2007, 09:45 PM
i noticed.

any pointers?

baseballer1100
04-30-2007, 10:03 PM
as far as what. I have yet to find a con in a table saw except for space.

iamamp3pimp
04-30-2007, 10:06 PM
well i really meant rip sizes.

i want a table saw so bad as im **** good with the circ, but the table saw is much faster, and the angles are perfect.

baseballer1100
05-01-2007, 12:34 AM
well i really meant rip sizes.

i want a table saw so bad as im **** good with the circ, but the table saw is much faster, and the angles are perfect.

Indeed. How much room do you have to work with? and how much do you want to spend? to be honest as many boxes as you build i wouldnt waste my time with some of the smaller ones. But if you dont have the room then. yeah.

fwb_1234
05-01-2007, 12:34 AM
there is a current build log where a guy is building a table for his smaller craftsman table saw. its got to be one of the first 10.

Here's the link. I did the work for you.
http://www.caraudio.com/forum/showthread.php?t=220692

iamamp3pimp
05-01-2007, 12:41 AM
thanks.


i looked at that, it kinda gave me the idea from this thread though.

baseballer link me to something that you'd recommend

savagebee
05-01-2007, 02:36 AM
you can buy them with a 6-7 ft fence, but, if you need a fence that big, most builders are experienced enough to make their own work table....

mine is tiny, and I dont have the room, and probably not the skills to make a fence that big, so I just use my circ most of the time with a straight edge

Fattony911
05-01-2007, 08:13 AM
make sure you get at least a semi decent one. the cheap ones 100 and under aren't worth anything make sure the fence is sturdy too one that locks into place securly is good. Try and go name brand too dewalt is what i have and not any problems yet

helotaxi
05-01-2007, 09:16 AM
Rip width isn't everything. After all, how do you rip a 48" piece to 36" with a saw that only goes to 24"? You take 12" off the back.

iagrdshaka
05-01-2007, 10:08 AM
Rip width isn't everything. After all, how do you rip a 48" piece to 36" with a saw that only goes to 24"? You take 12" off the back.

:word: Learned that way back in my Junior High shop class! lol

bjfish11
05-01-2007, 02:17 PM
Rip width isn't everything. After all, how do you rip a 48" piece to 36" with a saw that only goes to 24"? You take 12" off the back.

True, but its not always that easy. For example, say you need 2 panels 37" long, but your fence goes to 32". And to fit everything correctly, you need to cut the 37's off the length (96"). It gets challenging.

When I was looking for a table saw, rip capacity was one of the highest up specs I was looking at. For cutting Trupan, I didnt need a ton of power. So I bought a Rigid table saw from HD. It had a 36" rip capacity, and had a nice big cast iron top. I have just added a 50" Rip capacity biesemeyer fence, because 36" wasnt enough a lot of the time.



To Robin....
A table saw would be a great addition to your tools. It saves so much time, its not even funny. Once I get the cut sheet printed off, It takes me less than 20 minutes to cut ALL my panels (for a standard ported box), get all the panels routered that need routered, tape laid on, and all pieces painted. I couldnt imagine how long it would take to cut it all with a circ.

helotaxi
05-01-2007, 08:24 PM
Don't get me wrong, having a large rip width is nice but my point is that unless you build stuff for a living and can sacrifice a lot of room somewhat permanently to your tablesaw getting a huge rip distance isn't practical. Knowing how to do what you need to do with the tools available is a lot more important.

A huge factor for me is the fact that I don't have a truck or a way to get sheets of material home in one piece in the first place. 36"x48" is the biggest piece I can fit in my car. I can cut any size possible from that size piece with a 24" fence throw. I'd love to have a cabinet table with an 8' laminated table on either side of the blade and a precision fence and several precision T-slots on it but I just don't have the room. Between a garage that is only nominally "2-car" and 3 motorcycles I'm kinda limited on real estate and I'm sure I'm not alone.

Things I would look for: belt drive, secure fence, cast iron table, good miter gauge, decent sized and sturdy extensions on the table. If you're going to get a saw and really want it to be as useful as it can be don't get a cheap saw. I've built furnture, cut hardwood flooring, built a new staircase and a lot more in addition to building several boxes with my saw. It has more than paid for itself in the 4 years I've had it. It's one of the larger Craftsman saws. I've added a router table as a replacement for one of the table extensions. It has also doubled as my workbench for those 4 years in the absence of something better.

iamamp3pimp
05-01-2007, 08:43 PM
True, but its not always that easy. For example, say you need 2 panels 37" long, but your fence goes to 32". And to fit everything correctly, you need to cut the 37's off the length (96"). It gets challenging.

When I was looking for a table saw, rip capacity was one of the highest up specs I was looking at. For cutting Trupan, I didnt need a ton of power. So I bought a Rigid table saw from HD. It had a 36" rip capacity, and had a nice big cast iron top. I have just added a 50" Rip capacity biesemeyer fence, because 36" wasnt enough a lot of the time.



To Robin....
A table saw would be a great addition to your tools. It saves so much time, its not even funny. Once I get the cut sheet printed off, It takes me less than 20 minutes to cut ALL my panels (for a standard ported box), get all the panels routered that need routered, tape laid on, and all pieces painted. I couldnt imagine how long it would take to cut it all with a circ.



to be honest, i can get 4 24x48 sheets, or a 24x48 and 2 36x48 sheets cut down to size in about 20-30 minutes.
to size = a standard ported box.

iamamp3pimp
05-01-2007, 08:45 PM
so getting a table saw would be a hefty investment..?

thunder9500
05-01-2007, 08:52 PM
and the maximum rip widths...i was in the store looking, and it doesnt look like i can go bigger than 16 inches.


wtf?

here's a con for ya......some of you may have seen these


http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y8/shaven99ranger/Hand%20Injury/Picture_026.jpg

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y8/shaven99ranger/Hand%20Injury/100_1918.jpg

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y8/shaven99ranger/Hand%20Injury/Photo45.jpg

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y8/shaven99ranger/Hand%20Injury/100_1922.jpg

http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y8/shaven99ranger/Hand%20Injury/100_1920.jpg

iamamp3pimp
05-01-2007, 09:05 PM
must have happened to you?

thunder9500
05-01-2007, 09:23 PM
happened to my left hand. cut three of them off.

iamamp3pimp
05-01-2007, 09:25 PM
and they fixed it?



still have the use of your hand and all that mess?

thunder9500
05-01-2007, 09:29 PM
and they fixed it?



still have the use of your hand and all that mess?



thumb works good. about 50% smaller than the right hand though :(

middle finger works 85% and the index finger is dead. i keep it taped to the middle finger to keep it out of the way until I can have it cut off....again.

helotaxi
05-02-2007, 10:21 AM
Safety FTW.

Bolognablake
05-02-2007, 10:50 AM
here's a con for ya......some of you may have seen these


D A Y U M .

Mr Cabinetry
05-02-2007, 11:12 AM
thumb works good. about 50% smaller than the right hand though :(

middle finger works 85% and the index finger is dead. i keep it taped to the middle finger to keep it out of the way until I can have it cut off....again.

Thunder,

I feel for ya man, I really do because I to suffered at the hands of TS many years ago which my left hand got blasted.

Lost just above the first digit middle finger, nicked the index and fourth finger and completely lost the the first digit of the thumb.

Tablesaw's are nothing to fu<k with or around. You even let your attention be distracted for a second, not even that long and your road pizza.

And for anyone that thinks " Ahh Man, that shi!t's never going to happen to me ", don't kid yourself, because I have heard that comment so many times from folks that work around such equipment that the odds will catch up with you eventually.

Don't buy a POS saw thinking you can do on it what can be done on larger saws because your just asking for trouble and let those pictures burn into your mind to remind you that power tools ain't toys.

iamamp3pimp
05-02-2007, 12:05 PM
thumb works good. about 50% smaller than the right hand though :(

middle finger works 85% and the index finger is dead. i keep it taped to the middle finger to keep it out of the way until I can have it cut off....again.

i suppose so they can try to fix it?

CobaltKicker
05-02-2007, 12:14 PM
**** dude, and I thought some of my cuts were bad lol...Texas Chainsaw Massacre up in here !!! FTW!!! lol

Mr Cabinetry
05-02-2007, 12:17 PM
Judging from the pictures of the injury to the index finger, it appear that the digit / knuckle joint is completely gone.

Meaning - The tablesaw blade completely transected that joint rendering any movement - ie - he won't be able to bend it.

Same thing happened to my thumb, I can bend the thumb at the knuckle joint, the digit / joint above that, the TS blade cut thru it and to my knowledge an orthopedic surgeon can't fix or repair digit joints.

Thunder, do have any movement in the index finger above the cut or was their permanent nerve damage?

thunder9500
05-02-2007, 12:23 PM
Judging from the pictures of the injury to the index finger, it appear that the digit / knuckle joint is completely gone.

Meaning - The tablesaw blade completely transected that joint rendering any movement - ie - he won't be able to bend it.

Same thing happened to my thumb, I can bend the thumb at the knuckle joint, the digit / joint above that, the TS blade cut thru it and to my knowledge an orthopedic surgeon can't fix or repair digit joints.

Thunder, do have any movement in the index finger above the cut or was their permanent nerve damage?


I cut the index off just above the knuckle joint. They got it attached back, but that's the only joint that works. every joint above it is frozen solid. I cut 1/4" chunk out of all the tendons and nerves, so when they reattached it the finger stayed bent from that day.

It *****, I promise.

It got my thumb from side to side, cut 40% through the bone and twised the meat so the fingernail faced the opposite direction.

It cut my middle finger just above the knuckle joint and got 50% of that bone.

Then it tore the skin at the knuckle fold open all the way down to my pinky.

CobaltKicker
05-02-2007, 12:28 PM
:coolpics:

iagrdshaka
05-02-2007, 12:33 PM
****!!

Mr Cabinetry
05-02-2007, 12:33 PM
I cut the index off just above the knuckle joint. They got it attached back, but that's the only joint that works. every joint above it is frozen solid. I cut 1/4" chunk out of all the tendons and nerves, so when they reattached it the finger stayed bent from that day.

It *****, I promise.

It got my thumb from side to side, cut 40% through the bone and twised the meat so the fingernail faced the opposite direction.

It cut my middle finger just above the knuckle joint and got 50% of that bone.

Then it tore the skin at the knuckle fold open all the way down to my pinky.

Dude, Believe Me, I know it totally *****.

You have a long way to go and alot of therapy to deal with.

The b!tch about such an injury like this is after all the healing and therapy is done, on rainy and cold days it will feel like ya whacked it all over again and at a certain point in time that sensation will disappear as well.

The real b!tch of it is if you whack or bang it on something, you'll curse like son of b!tch.

Omarvelous
05-02-2007, 05:41 PM
ouch!!!

IT can happen to any1, pro to beginner.

Plan, plan plan!!!

Amazon.com can b ur friend on getting good deal on table saw.

iamamp3pimp
05-02-2007, 06:13 PM
I think that ill just stick with a circ....

Omarvelous
05-03-2007, 05:22 PM
I think that ill just stick with a circ....

Honestly....

a Circle Saw, a Router, and maybe a Jigsaw/Drill..... some bits.... all you really need!

Wanna get fancy, or do a lot, then that's were the table comes in handy.

iamamp3pimp
05-04-2007, 02:11 AM
Honestly....

a Circle Saw, a Router, and maybe a Jigsaw/Drill..... some bits.... all you really need!

Wanna get fancy, or do a lot, then that's were the table comes in handy.

i do well without the table, i was just striving for a little more, but judging form the pics, i dont thing its necessary

helotaxi
05-04-2007, 09:42 AM
If I showed you pics of car crash victims would you quit driving, too?

iamamp3pimp
05-04-2007, 12:26 PM
no, not at all.

but the risk, vs reward factors in here.......I mean I'm not saying that i am the best on the planet, but you have seen my builg logs.....done with a circ.

the only real benefit that i can gain by using a tablesaw is time saved. it is more convienent im sure, but the money/risk/inconvienence going into building a table saw table, and not being able to park in my garage makes it not worth it in my opinion.

helotaxi
05-04-2007, 02:39 PM
The risk is no more than with any other power tool. If you're smart/careful there is almost no risk. No offense to the guys that hurt themselves, but you have to do something dumb to injure yourself with a table saw. If you don't put your hand in the path of the blade with the saw running EVER, you won't cut off fingers, period. Complacency will bite you, though and not just with a saw.

There is a lot more to it than speed as well. There are things you can do with a table saw that you can't with a circ saw, Dados come to mind.

I hear ya on the space thing, though. My garage is full.

Crown_amps
05-04-2007, 02:44 PM
pros they cut wood.....

cons you can cut your hand off

helotaxi
05-04-2007, 03:05 PM
pros they cut wood.....

cons you can cut your hand off

Wow, that was incredibly and profoundly insightful. You should share more of your wisdom with the forum :rolleyes:

Omarvelous
05-04-2007, 03:06 PM
The risk is no more than with any other power tool. If you're smart/careful there is almost no risk. No offense to the guys that hurt themselves, but you have to do something dumb to injure yourself with a table saw. If you don't put your hand in the path of the blade with the saw running EVER, you won't cut off fingers, period. Complacency will bite you, though and not just with a saw.

There is a lot more to it than speed as well. There are things you can do with a table saw that you can't with a circ saw, Dados come to mind.

I hear ya on the space thing, though. My garage is full.

But in all honesty, i think a circular saw is far more dangeous then a table saw, now that I think about it....

One is free hand, and the other is stationary...

So, i mean, if your doing a lot of boxes, i'd say get the table man.

iamamp3pimp
05-04-2007, 03:09 PM
I do do a lot of boxes, but i dont think im willing to sacrifice the garage to get one,..


id like to do dados though....

Crown_amps
05-04-2007, 03:13 PM
Wow, that was incredibly and profoundly insightful. You should share more of your wisdom with the forum :rolleyes:

THX i try :naughty:

Team RD - Evan
06-11-2007, 12:02 AM
There is a safety table saw with an aluminum brake, they are expensive and when the brake kicks in the saw is dead for the time being but id rather have a dead saw then a nub.

Roddy_T
06-11-2007, 12:58 AM
I build Kitchen Cabinets for the last 10 years, the only 2 things i seen were a kick back from a tablesaw and a finger lost ina shaper(large router)
the only time you cut your self is when u are not thinking or doing something that you shouldnt
I would bet that ppl lose more fingers on a circular saw then a table saw(if you have to hold your piece what are you cutting?)
heres a kick but saw if you have the room
www.sawstop.com
take a look at there vids with the hot dog lol

I dont like any one to cut there hands on any tools

circular saw's are a lot cheapper then tablesaws

baseballer1100
06-11-2007, 01:11 AM
table saws have no cons

THUNDERBIRD
06-11-2007, 02:06 PM
i do well without the table, i was just striving for a little more, but judging form the pics, i dont thing its necessary

dont let the pictures scare you. i mean a table saw is a no joking tool. if you have never used one i would suggest looking into taking a woodshop class maybe at the local community college. you learn to use all the tools properly. they are nice i have one myself, a craftsman 10in. i dont remember the specs on it but it was like $179 on sale. you just have to know where to keep your hands, that a table saw isnt for crosscutting, thats what a chop saw is for. to push the wood all the way threw straight and not stop otherwise it can flyback, KEEP THE BLADE GUARD DOWN. you do enough where you would benefit from a table saw.

THUNDERBIRD
06-11-2007, 02:08 PM
o yeah you have to respect the saw thats the big one when you get comfortable with it that is when you get hurt.

Ruffy
06-29-2007, 06:07 PM
bumping an semi old thread to post some words of wisdom.

1) It doesnt matter how much power it has, How expensive it was, or how awesome you think you are at using it. Always treat any saw with fear and respect.

2) Dont cut things with the wrong blades, dont crosscut with a blade thats not made for crosscutting.

3) It's best to go slow and steady than fast.

4) Always, Always, ALWAYS use pushrods, featherboards, pushsticks on a table saw. There is no reason your hand should ever go farther than where the blade starts.

5) No reason to ever lean over even at an angle, It doesnt matter if your 2'+ away from the blade.

6) If you feel resistance back the material off and go back to cutting slowly. Don't force it.

7) Make sure your tool is clean and aligned properly. A Misaligned blade is the most common reasons for kickback.

Lastly, $100-200 dollar saws arent bad if you know what they're for. You wont build 100 cabinets/boxes in a row with it. But a few cuts here and there ever so often is no problem. The most common problem with them is small fence and misaligned blade.

If you truly want a safe saw, buy a sawstop
http://www.sawstop.com/

look at the demo videos, you can press your finger against the spinning blade and just get a small cut.

We bought one of these at my job. It replaced the Grizzly table saw we used prior after someone had an "accident" and cut 2 fingers off.

Anonymous User
06-29-2007, 06:21 PM
Sawstop FTW!

we have one in the wood shop at my school.

04_edge
06-29-2007, 06:27 PM
i hate using table saws, im not gonna lie, they scare me.

but thats because ive seen my grandpa cut his finger off, and he was a cabinet maker for a lloooonnnngggg time and new what he was doing.

helotaxi
06-29-2007, 06:30 PM
2) Dont cut things with the wrong blades, dont crosscut with a blade thats not made for crosscutting.

Ripping with the wrong blade is the one you really have to worry about.


6) If you feel resistance back the material off and go back to cutting slowly. Don't force it.

Only back it out after turning off the saw. Otherwise you're asking for a kickback. Also, most good saws will have anti kickback pawls along the riving knife making it impossible to back the work out without disengaging them. That requires a hand near the blade which means the saw should be off.

Things like the Sawstop are nice but still no replacement for good safety practice. If you're relying on such a device to keep you from getting hurt, you're a fool.

mightycrappy
06-29-2007, 09:52 PM
Actually if you are relying on it from keeping you from getting hurt you're smart. Because regardless of how safe you are, or always try to be, accidents happen.
If not you maybe someone you know that has used or needs to use the saw.
Better safe than sorry and that's pretty **** safe.

ballstothewall
06-29-2007, 11:10 PM
Actually if you are relying on it from keeping you from getting hurt you're smart.

No, your not. It is a mechanical device, it can and will fail.

doyoshuffle5
06-29-2007, 11:42 PM
most saws of an adjustable deck on them so u can pretty much make them any size and the one i have really doesnt take up much space

its a delta pretty i got it from lowes

done alot of flooring and a few boxes with it and it still works like a champ