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View Full Version : piecing your box togther...



Gianotti
02-13-2007, 04:01 PM
what better to use screws or nails and a nail gun? ive always used screws but using a nail gun woul have a cleaner look and make the edges easier to sand i would think...?

2loud4u
02-13-2007, 04:02 PM
eather will do.
All they do is hold the wood together till the glue dries.

uhoh45
02-13-2007, 04:06 PM
nails and lots of glue ftw

Lil_KB
02-13-2007, 04:07 PM
screws ftw. nails don't hold it tight enough imo.

but i'd use clamps if you're that worried about it.

kickerlivinloud
02-13-2007, 05:25 PM
Nail holes are easyer to hid if your going to paint the box or leave it plain. Personally I use screws anymore. They pull the wood together much better then just nailing it would.



Jon

jmasc
02-13-2007, 06:02 PM
clamps if you have access to them, if not id use screws.

singlefordrange
02-13-2007, 09:11 PM
Screws FTW! I have some holes i need to clean up in my box!

dspencer24
02-13-2007, 09:58 PM
I used sheetrock screws and they worked our great but i also used wood clamps as well. You can always fill the hole with wood filler / putty and then sand it away..

helotaxi
02-14-2007, 12:09 PM
Depending on the size of the nail it might split the end grain of the wood. Pre-drilled screws and glue or biscuits, clamps and glue or just clamps and glue.

bjfish11
02-14-2007, 03:13 PM
Screws.
Nails do not pull the panels together tight enough to make a great joint.

Try this: Put a few panels together (not your box panels, just some scrap wood) Use nails in some and screws in some others. You will notice a BIG difference.

Erthshker
02-14-2007, 03:27 PM
Ive used brads nd screw....prefer screws the hold to the wood a lil better than the brads do...

PV Audio
02-14-2007, 06:19 PM
Lay down your glue, clamp it tight, and screw it down. All there is to it.

You DO need clamps by the way.

bjfish11
02-14-2007, 07:24 PM
Lay down your glue, clamp it tight, and screw it down. All there is to it.

You DO need clamps by the way.

No you dont ;)

Tiger Bass
02-14-2007, 08:02 PM
Screws are probably better for people without a lot of wood working experience. They pull the wood together and form a tighter, stronger bond.

Nails are also just fine though. If you come from a long line of professional carpenter's and have picked up a couple tips in your life and know what you are doing, there's nothing wrong with using nails. They are more asthetically pleasing, they are less likely to split the wood, and easier to work with.

However, the glue is what should be doing a good majority of the holding. The nails/screws should only act as a reinforcement. That's why you shouldn't go cheap on glue and get the $5 bundle pack of 6 bottles of Bubba's Special from Sam's. Go to a real hardware store and get something like Gorrila Glue or Titebond.

But more importantly, it depends on what you are building. If you're going to build a massive 10 cubic foot box, I would naturally use screws all the way around, along with supportive bracing. If you're going to make a medium sized box, I would use screws in a couple important spots, like on the bracing itself, and nails the rest of the way. Then for a much smaller box, like the one in my sig, I only used a nail gun and glue with no bracing.

As for clamps, they are important. People use them for a reason. Unless you want you **** falling apart, I would use them. Just don't go overboard. The purpose of a clamp is to hold multiple pieces of material together and stable till the glue dries and bonds. Not to clamp it so tightly that all the glue gets squeezed out of the joint.

PV Audio
02-14-2007, 09:00 PM
No you dont ;)
How do you NOT need clamps when making a wood glue bond? Yes, if you can stabilize and line up your board properly and screw it down without it moving, then yes, I can see that. However, I can never do that and keep the same bond tightness. I even got flamed over at diyaudio for asking that :laugh:

Mr Cabinetry
02-14-2007, 09:12 PM
Been building enclosure's now for 11yr and all I use is a 18 Gauge Brad Air Nailer and Elmer's Professional Woodworker Glue.

Only time I use screws for fabrication is for slot port walls, bracing and mitered corner parts.

bjfish11
02-14-2007, 09:35 PM
How do you NOT need clamps when making a wood glue bond? Yes, if you can stabilize and line up your board properly and screw it down without it moving, then yes, I can see that. However, I can never do that and keep the same bond tightness. I even got flamed over at diyaudio for asking that :laugh:

There are some people out there that can line everything up without clamps. Thats how you dont NEED clamps. Do they help, absolutely, but you dont NEED clamps.

bjfish11
02-14-2007, 09:38 PM
Been building enclosure's now for 11yr and all I use is a 18 Gauge Brad Air Nailer and Elmer's Professional Woodworker Glue.

Only time I use screws for fabrication is for slot port walls, bracing and mitered corner parts.

Personally, I hate the way brads hold things together. Everything just wobbles our of square. Its just bothers me. When I put a screw in nice a tight, that panel wont budge, unless im prying on it.

bryce-man
02-14-2007, 09:57 PM
i didnt have any clamps... so i predrilled the holes and glued and then put the screws in half way then put a tie down across the two pieces and tightened the screws and the tie down almost at the same time... worked great

you just have to think..

Mr Cabinetry
02-15-2007, 09:29 AM
Personally, I hate the way brads hold things together. Everything just wobbles our of square. Its just bothers me. When I put a screw in nice a tight, that panel wont budge, unless im prying on it.


Hmmm, I've never had that problem only because in the method use the brad nailer to attach the panels together since I use a stagger pattern rather than just shooting in a straight line.

And, why would anyone be prying on any of the panels to assemble an enclosure???

That just puts stress on the joints. If the parts are cut clean, true and square, you shouldn't have to be prying anything.

bjfish11
02-15-2007, 03:26 PM
Hmmm, I've never had that problem only because in the method use the brad nailer to attach the panels together since I use a stagger pattern rather than just shooting in a straight line.

And, why would anyone be prying on any of the panels to assemble an enclosure???

That just puts stress on the joints. If the parts are cut clean, true and square, you shouldn't have to be prying anything.

The point I was trying to make, is that the only way to pull the box out of square with screws in it, is to pull/pry on the panels.
with brad nails, for example, when I would go to turn the box, to work on a different side, it just pulls the panels out of square.

I was doing some testing with it on a box I build for myself, and I just hated how it held everything together. Didnt hold the joints tight like screws do.

Just my .02

PV Audio
02-15-2007, 04:36 PM
Wood, screws, glue, clamps and "beverage" of choice. All one needs to build a proper enclosure. :D

Mr Cabinetry
02-15-2007, 08:32 PM
The point I was trying to make, is that the only way to pull the box out of square with screws in it, is to pull/pry on the panels.
with brad nails, for example, when I would go to turn the box, to work on a different side, it just pulls the panels out of square.

I was doing some testing with it on a box I build for myself, and I just hated how it held everything together. Didnt hold the joints tight like screws do.

Just my .02


Oh, I got what your saying.

I'm just saying that screws don't necessarily make a box square, it's the panels that make the box square.

If the panels/parts are not cut square, then all the screws in the world are not going to make it square.

bjfish11
02-15-2007, 10:35 PM
Oh, I got what your saying.

I'm just saying that screws don't necessarily make a box square, it's the panels that make the box square.

If the panels/parts are not cut square, then all the screws in the world are not going to make it square.

Gotcha man.
I was assuming good cuts.
Your right, if your cuts arent square, no fastener or clamp in the world will make a difference.