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View Full Version : .75 MDF, what size/type of screws to use?



Supergumby5000
01-10-2007, 07:37 PM
Gonna hit up home depot in like an hour. Just curious on what kind of screws you guys use for your enclosures, or maybe som eform of locktite or anyting. Let me know ASAP!

sqhertz
01-10-2007, 07:41 PM
screw screws.
unless you dont have enough clamps, or feel like pre-drilling then driving screws into your box then say get em. 1 5/8 course thread drywall screws. 4$ at the depot.
titebond II alone FTW.

azbass
01-10-2007, 07:43 PM
i use screw screws too

mikey060
01-10-2007, 07:44 PM
screw screws are tight. especially the pink ones

Iakona
01-10-2007, 07:45 PM
Screw Screws?

sqhertz
01-10-2007, 07:45 PM
double baffles. boxes where bigger subs are going in, then id use em. wont hurt unless you split the wood. just extra work.
i used titebond 2 on both my boxes for my assassin 8 and it came out pretty effin solid.

azbass
01-10-2007, 07:46 PM
Screw Screws?

yes. they are awsomeness

geowick07
01-10-2007, 07:47 PM
As stated in the second post, screw screws if you can. Just use Titebond II or III and clamps if you can. If not, then use 1 1/2" or 1 5/8" drywall screws and Titebond.

dkmesa
01-10-2007, 07:47 PM
wood screws 1-1/4 in length

pimpedout97x
01-10-2007, 07:48 PM
as far as glue goes....

TiteBond II FTW!

Supergumby5000
01-10-2007, 07:54 PM
i use screw screws too

what brand?........






j/k. you guys reccomend titebond to go with em, or is it uneccessary? box is going to require two full sheets of MDF. gona be **** heavy.

sqhertz
01-10-2007, 08:09 PM
titebond is a must. or really any woodglue. caulk on the inside edges of the box helps seal too.
two full sheets is heavy...1 5/8 screws every 4-6 inches should do fine. you could go more or less but that is what i would do.

Supergumby5000
01-10-2007, 08:23 PM
yeah definately doing wood glue caulking and screwing, was just wondering if i should use that titebond on the screws as well, or would that be overkill?

Supergumby5000
01-10-2007, 08:23 PM
or is titebond just another type of wood glue to use?

sqhertz
01-10-2007, 08:28 PM
you could, i dont see why not. its thinner , not like elmers wood glue. i think ive read of someone on here doing that.
the glue on the bonding pieces of the wood is really whats going to matter. ill put it like this...once that glue dries..the WOOD ITSELF is going to break before that joint does. i try and break the joint on scrap wood with every new glue i try. so far with elmers wood glue and titebond II , the wood broke first.

sqhertz
01-10-2007, 08:29 PM
titebond is the brandname. there is a titbond 1 and III but II proved to be better.
elmers probond is popular on here also.

disturbedfuel15
01-10-2007, 10:54 PM
http://www.caraudio.com/forum/showthread.php?t=176424

o6blink
01-10-2007, 11:43 PM
IF you don't have clamps, and don't want to purchase clamps (me), what screws do I need for the job? Would screwing or nailing be better? :)

PV Audio
01-11-2007, 12:07 AM
Okay people, screws are not a replacement for clamps, let alone glue. You lay down your glue, clamp it tightly, then screw the wood together to hold the clamped bond while you go about your other business on the box. Otherwise, you won't get a chemical bond and will only have a strong physical bond.

406er
01-11-2007, 01:13 AM
glue, clamp, air nail for me

jmanpc
01-11-2007, 01:15 AM
i use 1 5/8"

helotaxi
01-11-2007, 05:29 PM
Okay people, screws are not a replacement for clamps, let alone glue. You lay down your glue, clamp it tightly, then screw the wood together to hold the clamped bond while you go about your other business on the box. Otherwise, you won't get a chemical bond and will only have a strong physical bond.

If you predrill the screws prior to aplying the glue you don't need clamps. I've built tons of boxes without using the first clamp by screwing it all together. The screws provide the clamping force to give the glue the best potential for a good bond.

There is no chemical bond in wood glue. The wood is not fused together like styrene plastic is when using plasti-weld. The glue does soak into the wood and integrate the wood itself into the final resin matrix, but that constitutes a good mechanical bond, not a chemical one.

PV Audio
01-11-2007, 05:42 PM
Wood glue doesn't make a chemical bond..? I'm going to need to see some proof of that because not only have I heard nothing less than wood glue making a chemical bond, but my grandfather owned a woodworking mill and told me that wood glue makes chemical bonds, and he was in the business for about 50 years.

helotaxi
01-11-2007, 06:19 PM
Wood glue doesn't make a chemical bond..? I'm going to need to see some proof of that because not only have I heard nothing less than wood glue making a chemical bond, but my grandfather owned a woodworking mill and told me that wood glue makes chemical bonds, and he was in the business for about 50 years.

Chemically bond what to what? Wood glue soaks into the wood and then hardens. It is designed for porous materials becuase the fact that it soaks in is vital to the joint strength. It has a low adhesion compared to something like epoxy which uses the strenth of the adhesive bond to make a strong joint. In a proper wood glue joint, the result is a composite joint. The glue is the binder and the wood itself is the matrix. The result is something akin to a layup of fiberglass where the resin is integral to the finished product, but that is still completely different than a chemical bond.

PV Audio
01-11-2007, 08:52 PM
From what I've been told, wood glue emulsifies the woodfibers at said joint and bonds the pieces together. This is why it's nearly impossible to directly shear a wood glue joint apart when it's fully set. It holds true for other glues, but you'll just keep tearing the wood shorter and shorter and the glue won't actually separate. I'm sorry as well though, because I'm very ignorant when it comes to things I've been told, so if you are in fact right, then I learned something new today. :)

PV Audio
01-11-2007, 08:53 PM
And the "soaking in" reasoning doesn't really work very well because cyanoacrylate glues do the exact same thing, but they aren't designed for porous materials...

05fronty
01-11-2007, 08:54 PM
whats titbond 1 and 3?

o6blink
01-11-2007, 09:00 PM
titebond I is like the first kind..first strength. II is the second strength. III is their toughest/strongest glue.

PV Audio
01-11-2007, 09:15 PM
But titebond 3 is worthless to box builders because unless you like waiting weeks for your glue to fully cure OR you are going to be swimming with the enclosure, you're wasting your money. I seriously dropped about a teaspoon of T3 into a clump of sawdust, and it took over four days to dry. That's retarded. Titebond 1 is fine, but T2 is like 50 cents more, so you minus well buy it. I'm currently using ProBond, but it seems like they switched up the formula or something, it has a consistency like titebond 2...which I don't particularly like (great glue, too runny. the old probond was thicker and set better for workability).

o6blink
01-11-2007, 09:44 PM
At the lowes near me they had all three types for the same price.

PV Audio
01-11-2007, 10:13 PM
The same size as well? If so, you still shouldn't even bother with 3 and just get 2.

o6blink
01-11-2007, 10:59 PM
Yeah, they were all the same size. I'm just saying though.. I got the II. Took me about a half hour to find the wood glue, their stupid employees couldn't even find it.

helotaxi
01-12-2007, 05:20 PM
From what I've been told, wood glue emulsifies the woodfibers at said joint and bonds the pieces together. This is why it's nearly impossible to directly shear a wood glue joint apart when it's fully set. It holds true for other glues, but you'll just keep tearing the wood shorter and shorter and the glue won't actually separate. I'm sorry as well though, because I'm very ignorant when it comes to things I've been told, so if you are in fact right, then I learned something new today. :)

Like I said, the glue integrates itself with the wood and forms a composite material at the joint. The composite is stronger than either of the parts. Think fiberglass.


And the "soaking in" reasoning doesn't really work very well because cyanoacrylate glues do the exact same thing, but they aren't designed for porous materials...Exactly, most CA glues aren't designed for porous materials. The bond is formed through surface adhesion alone just like epoxy. CA forms a film on the surfaces to be joined and the thinner the film, the stronger the joint. Any imperfection in the surfaces will weaken the joint. If the CA soaks into the material, it can't fomr a bonding film and the surface isn't flat either.

Wood glue fills the pores in the material and cures as one piece with the wood integrated into the solid.

PV Audio
01-12-2007, 08:33 PM
Gotcha. :)