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fearthepand
12-22-2006, 11:16 PM
When building kick panels... where would be a good place to aim your speakes? I've read of some people who said their tweeters were too harsh when they were aimied directly at them. So where would be best?

fearthepand
12-22-2006, 11:30 PM
ttt

squeak9798
12-22-2006, 11:31 PM
The "best" thing to do is get the speakers on a baffle, wrap the rear of the mid in some towels to help block the rearwave and start aiming the speakers and see what sounds best. What works for your situation is going to be completely speaker/vehicle acoustic dependent. There is, unfortunately, no one-size-fits-all aiming scheme. There are some various techniques to get you started....but from there it's just going to be sitting in the vehicle w/ the speakers playing and fine tuning.

A good place to start is with aiming the speakers at the rear of the headunit.

fearthepand
12-22-2006, 11:34 PM
Sounds pretty good to me thanks

fearthepand
12-22-2006, 11:36 PM
Also would you get some pretty decent mid bass out of kick panels?

Oak244
12-22-2006, 11:55 PM
Also would you get some pretty decent mid bass out of kick panels?

Probably not. Most people who have speakers in the kicks, tend to later install a midbass driver in their doors I find.

As for aiming, a method I read that sounded right was this. Imagine a light in the passengers seat, so that your head casts a shadow on the window. Aim the speaker at chis level and about 2 inches in front. This will keep the stage in front of you and not directly in your face.

It also depends on the speaker used. My Midrange driver barely had any fall at 30 degree's, and still not much even at 60 degree's. I was limited on how well I could aim the speaker, but it did not matter much. On the other hand, my tweeter falls off badly between 30-60 degrees of axis, so I will spend a lot more time finding the best place for it.

squeak9798
12-23-2006, 12:12 AM
Also would you get some pretty decent mid bass out of kick panels?

You can with proper consideration given to airspace.

If you seal the speakers up in too small of an enclosure for their design....then you will choke out their low frequency extension.

But with adequate airspace and/or venting them for more of an infinite baffle alignment, low end response can remain unhindered. My kicks, for example, are really little more than a frame to hold the speaker baffle and prevent interference from the backwave. The majority of the rear of the kicks were cut out.

fearthepand
12-23-2006, 10:36 PM
Are your Kick Panels Fiberglass if not what did you make them out of?

enzowho
12-23-2006, 11:05 PM
I found this thread a little while ago. Its got some good information in it, which may or may not help you out. Link (http://www.diymobileaudio.com/forum/showthread.php?t=5664)

acold7dusta
12-23-2006, 11:08 PM
my SLCs in the kicks can hit pretty good, but like squeak said, they lack extension. if you can fit your speakers in the door (IB) put them there, if not, you may be stuck with kicks. nothing wrong with kicks though, still will get very accurate sound

fearthepand
12-23-2006, 11:27 PM
if nothing else my sub would help with the low end extension i guess

squeak9798
12-23-2006, 11:43 PM
Are your Kick Panels Fiberglass if not what did you make them out of?

Mine ?

'glass

fearthepand
12-23-2006, 11:55 PM
so yours are glassed Squeak? Ive been reading on that site enzowho posted and really i dont understand alot of it but from what i sort of understood is that one of the best sounding installs would be mids in kick panels and tweeters in the a-pillars. so have you ever tried this?

enzowho
12-24-2006, 12:04 AM
My bad, I forgot to say post 12 is a good place to start.

squeak9798
12-24-2006, 12:15 AM
but from what i sort of understood is that one of the best sounding installs would be mids in kick panels and tweeters in the a-pillars. so have you ever tried this?

That's not really what it said.

It said that imaging cues for high frequencies are intensity-related, and not time-arrival related. So having high-mounted tweeters can work. But everything in audio is a compromise.....you gain a little here, you give a little there.


I personally am a fan of keeping all the drivers as close together as possible. But maybe I just haven't heard the right cars yet. I'm sure there's plenty of cars that do great with high mounted tweeters. I've yet to hear them though :( The cars I have heard, haven't pulled it off well. Thus the sour taste in my mouth I guess.

In my car, getting the upper midrange/treble to a good stage height isn't a problem at all (IMO atleast). What I do have some problems with is the lower midrange, though I think right now that's largely due to some resonance/reflections I need to tame from the underside of the dash.

fearthepand
12-24-2006, 12:23 AM
so you are a fan of keeping your speakers all together. So i took it that most of the people on that forum are or were tring to achieve separtion in their front stage if they were why would they want this?

squeak9798
12-24-2006, 12:35 AM
So i took it that most of the people on that forum are or were tring to achieve separtion in their front stage if they were why would they want this?


Are you referring to spatial separation of the soundstage, or physical separation of the drivers ?


Also, I should note that separating the drivers would work best when running active. With passive, you don't have as much manipulation to correct things that may need electrically compensated for. As werewolf mentioned at the top of the second page; crossover slope/frequency adjustment, etc. Running passive it would be comparatively more of a crap shoot.

fearthepand
12-24-2006, 12:39 AM
i was talking aboout the spatical separation of the sound stage

squeak9798
12-24-2006, 12:52 AM
To provide a realistic soundstage. Accurate spatial reproduction of the source material entails having all of the instruments/vocals properly located on the soundstage. If the horns in an orchestra are located in the 2nd row behind the violinists who are in the front row...that's how it should be reproduced by your sound system. Everything in their proper places, properly spaced from each other and in relation to each other.